Henry Chetwynd-Talbot, 18th Earl of Shrewsbury

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Admiral The Right Honourable
The Earl of Shrewsbury
CB, PC
Admiral Henry John Chetwynd (1803-1868), 18th Earl of Shrewsbury, by George Frederick Watts.jpg
Henry John Chetwynd, 18th Earl of Shrewsbury (George Frederic Watts), ca. 1865
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms
In office
26 February 1858 – 11 June 1859
Monarch Victoria
Prime Minister The Earl of Derby
Preceded by The Lord Foley
Succeeded by The Lord Foley
Personal details
Born 8 November 1803 (1803-11-08)
Died 4 June 1868 (1868-06-05) (aged 64)
Lacock[1]
Nationality British
Political party Conservative
Spouse(s) Lady Sarah Beresford
(1807-1884)

Admiral Henry John Chetwynd-Talbot, 18th Earl of Shrewsbury, 3rd Earl Talbot, 18th Earl of Waterford, CB, PC (8 November 1803 – 4 June 1868), styled Viscount Ingestre between 1826 and 1849 and known as The Earl Talbot between 1849 and 1858, was a British naval commander and Conservative politician.

Background[edit]

Shrewsbury was the second but eldest surviving son of Charles Chetwynd-Talbot, 2nd Earl Talbot, by his marriage to Frances Thomasine, a daughter of Charles Lambart. He was styled Viscount Ingestre from the death of his elder brother in 1826 and succeeded his father as 3rd Earl Talbot in 1849. In 1860, following a long and expensive legal case in the House of Lords, and against the claims of three other men, he succeeded to the titles and estates (including Alton Towers) of a distant cousin and became 18th Earl of Shrewsbury and 18th Earl of Waterford.[2]

Military career[edit]

Talbot (as he then was) entered the Royal Navy in 1817. He commanded HMS Philomel at the Battle of Navarino, and was picked by Vice-Admiral Codrington to bring home the despatches announcing the victory.[3] He was soon after promoted to captain. On 9 March 1831, he was appointed a lieutenant in the Staffordshire Yeomanry,[4] which he gave up in 1833.[5] On 2 June 1832, was appointed lieutenant-colonel of the Staffordshire Militia,[6] which he resigned in early 1846.[7]

He was promoted a Rear-Admiral in 1854 and a Vice-Admiral and Admiral in 1865.

As Viscount Ingestre, while serving in the House of Commons, he was a leading supporter of the charlatan naval inventor Samuel Alfred Warner.[8]

Political career[edit]

Ingestre was returned to Parliament as one of two representatives for Hertford in 1830.[9] In May of the following year he was elected for Armagh City, a seat he only held until August 1831,[10] and then represented Dublin City until 1832.[11] In 1832 he was once again returned for Hertford. However, the election was declared void on petition in 1833.[9] He returned to the House of Commons as one of the two representatives for Staffordshire South in 1837, a seat he held until he succeeded his father in the Talbot earldom in 1849.[12] After entering the House of Lords he served under the Earl of Derby as a Lord-in-Waiting (government whip in the House of Lords) in 1852 and as Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms from 1858 to 1859.[13][14][15] In 1858 he was sworn of the Privy Council.[16]

Family[edit]

In 1828, while Lord Ingestre, he married Lady Sarah Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Beresford, 2nd Marquess of Waterford, by his marriage to Sarah Carpenter. They had four sons and four daughters. Their second son, Walter Cecil Carpenter (who assumed that surname by Royal licence in lieu of his patronymic) became an Admiral in the Royal Navy and a Member of Parliament, while their third son, Sir Reginald Talbot, became a soldier, politician, and colonial governor.

Their daughter Adelaide Chetwynd-Talbot married Adelbert Brownlow-Cust, 3rd Earl Brownlow in 1868.

Lord Shrewsbury died in June 1868, aged 64, and was succeeded in his titles by his eldest son Charles, Viscount Ingrestre. The Countess of Shrewsbury survived her husband by sixteen years and died in October 1884, aged 76.[2]

Notes[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Thomas Byron
Thomas Slingsby Duncombe
Member of Parliament for Hertford
with Thomas Slingsby Duncombe

1830–1831
Succeeded by
Thomas Slingsby Duncombe
John Currie
Preceded by
Henry Goulburn
Member of Parliament for Armagh City
1831
Succeeded by
Sir John William Head Brydges
Preceded by
Robert Way Harty
Louis Perrin
Member of Parliament for Dublin City
with Frederick Shaw

1831
Succeeded by
Daniel O'Connell
Edward Southwell Ruthven
Preceded by
Thomas Slingsby Duncombe
John Currie
Member of Parliament for Hertford
with Viscount Mahon
(election declared void 1833)

1832–1833
Succeeded by
Viscount Mahon
William Francis Cowper
Preceded by
Sir John Wrottesley
Sir Francis Holyoake-Goodricke
Member of Parliament for Staffordshire South
with George Anson

1837–1849
Succeeded by
George Anson
Viscount Lewisham
Political offices
Preceded by
The Lord Foley
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms
1858–1859
Succeeded by
The Lord Foley
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Earl of Shrewsbury
Lord High Steward of Ireland
1856–1868
Succeeded by
The Earl of Shrewsbury
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Bertram Talbot
Earl of Shrewsbury
1858–1868
Succeeded by
Charles John Chetwynd-Talbot
Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by
Bertram Talbot
Earl of Waterford
1858–1868
Succeeded by
Charles John Chetwynd-Talbot
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
Charles Chetwynd-Talbot
Earl Talbot
1849–1868
Succeeded by
Charles John Chetwynd-Talbot