Honor Award

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2010 Honor Award winners, founders of New Orleans Habitat Musicians’ Village, stand with National Building Museum chair Michael Glosserman (far L) and executive director Chase Rynd (far R); winners, from L to R: Jim Pate, Branford Marsalis, Ann Marie Wilkins, and Harry Connick, Jr.

The National Building Museum promotes excellence in architecture, engineering, construction, planning, and design. In furtherance of that mission, the Museum instituted an annual Honor Award in 1986 to recognize individuals and organizations that have made important contributions to the U.S.'s building heritage. Recipients are selected from a wide variety of backgrounds to call attention to the many factors that determine the form and quality of the built world.
Past recipients include ex-First Lady Lady Bird Johnson, who was honored in 1995 for her lifetime leadership in beautification and conservation campaigns.[1] Michael Eisner and The Walt Disney Company were honored in 2001 in recognition of their commitment to architecture, commissioning postmodernist architects such as Michael Graves, Robert A.M. Stern, Frank Gehry, and Arata Isozaki.[2] In 2010, Perkins and Will became the first architecture firm ever to receive the prize for "designing buildings that promote the health of occupants, conserve resources, and unify communities," in the words of Museum executive director Chase W. Rynd.[3]
The National Building Museum also bestows two other major awards: the Vincent Scully Prize to recognize exemplary practice, scholarship, or criticism in architecture, historic preservation, and urban design and the Henry C. Turner Prize for Innovation in Construction Technology.

List of Honor Award Winners[edit]

Year Recipients
2011 "Celebrating Our Past, Building Our Future: 25 Years of the Honor Award"
2010 "A Salute to Civic Innovators": Perkins + Will, the founders of New Orleans Habitat Musicians' Village, The U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon
2009 "A Salute to Visionaries in Sustainability": S. Richard Fedrizzi and the U.S. Green Building Council; Richard M. Daley and the City of Chicago; Majora Carter, founder of Sustainable South Bronx; Louis R. Chênevert and United Technologies Corporation
2008 Associated General Contractors of America
2007 Related
2006 Clark Construction Group, LLC
2005 Forest City Enterprises
2004 General Services Administration
2003 Major League Baseball and the National Football League
2002 DuPont
2001 Michael Eisner and The Walt Disney Company
2000 Gerald D. Hines
1999 Harold McGraw, Jr., Harold McGraw III, and the McGraw-Hill Companies
1998 Stephen Bechtel, Jr., Riley P. Bechtel, and The Bechtel Group
1997 Community Builders of Washington, D.C.: Morris Cafritz, Charles E. Smith, Oliver T. Carr, jr., and Charles A. Horsky[4]
1996 Cindy and Jay Pritzker
1995 Lady Bird Johnson
1994 James A. Johnson and Fannie Mae
1993 J. Carter Brown
1992 Civic Leadership of Greater Pittsburgh
1991 The Rockefeller Family
1990 IBM
1989 Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan
1988 James Rouse
1986 J. Irwin Miller

[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nadine Brozan, "Chronicle," June 10, 1995. https://www.nytimes.com/1995/06/10/style/chronicle-761196.html?src=pm
  2. ^ Benjamin Forgey, "Make-Believe Architecture: The Real Deal; Exhibit Explores the Reach Of Disney's Design Style," Washington Post, March 18, 2001.
  3. ^ Nicholas Tamarin, "Perkins + Will Nabs National Building Museum Honor Award," February 9, 2010. http://www.interiordesign.net/article/478838-Perkins_Will_Nabs_National_Building_Museum_Honor_Award.php
  4. ^ "Va. Trust Hopes to Buy Battlefield; Down Payment Applied To Chancellorsville Site". Washington Post. 1997-11-13. Missing or empty |url= (help)
  5. ^ National Building Museum, List of past Honor Award winners. http://www.nbm.org/support-us/awards_honors/honor-award/

External links[edit]