Horace F. Page

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Horace F. Page

Horace Francis Page (October 20, 1833-August 23, 1890) was an American politician that represented a Californian district in the United States House of Representatives. He is perhaps best known for the Page Act of 1875 which began the racial prohibitions against Asian, primarily Chinese, immigration.

Page was born near Medina, Orleans County, New York. He attended public schools and Millville Academy and then taught school in La Porte County, Indiana until 1854. Then, he moved to California and engaged in the sawmill business near Colfax. He moved to Placerville and engaged in the livery-stable business. He became engaged in mining, as a mail contractor, and as a stage proprietor.

Horace Page studied law, was admitted to the bar, and commenced practice in California. He was an unsuccessful Republican candidate for state senate in 1869. He served as a major in the California Militia. He was elected as a Republican to the 43rd United States Congress and the four succeeding Congresses. He served from March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1883. During the 47th United States Congress, he was the chairman of the Committee on Commerce. In 1882, he was an unsuccessful candidate for re-election to the 48th United States Congress.

In 1884, Horace Page was a delegate to the Republican National Convention. He resumed the practice of law in Washington, D.C. He died in San Francisco, California and was interred in Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, California.


External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Aaron Augustus Sargent
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California's 2nd congressional district

Succeeded by
James Budd