Ivan Reis

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Ivan Reis
10.13.12IvanReisByLuigiNovi1.jpg
Reis at the 2012 New York Comic Con.
Nationality Brazilian
Area(s) Penciller
Notable works
Action Comics
Aquaman vol. 7
Blackest Night
Brightest Day
Ghost
Green Lantern vol. 4
Justice League
Rann–Thanagar War

Ivan Reis is a Brazilian comics artist. He is known for his work on comic books such as Dark Horse Comics' Ghost, Marvel Comics' Captain Marvel, and DC Comics' Action Comics, Green Lantern and Aquaman series. According to collaborator Geoff Johns, Reis' drawing style resembles a combination of Alan Davis and Neal Adams.[1]

Career[edit]

For three years, Reis worked for Maurício de Sousa in Brazil. He began his international career for Dark Horse Comics working on Ghost, starting with issue #17 and acting as regular artist until the series concluded with issue #36. Other work for Dark Horse included The Mask, Time Cop, and Xena. He later worked for Lightning Comics.[2]

At Vertigo, he pencilled an issue of Grant Morrison's The Invisibles.[3] He became better known for Lady Death at Chaos! and CrossGen. At Marvel Comics, Reis worked on The Thing & She-Hulk: The Long Night, Avengers Icons: Vision, Captain Marvel, Iron Man, The Defenders, and The Avengers.

Since 2004 Reis has worked for DC Comics on Action Comics, Teen Titans, Rann–Thanagar War, Superman, and Infinite Crisis. Reis started pencilling Green Lantern vol. 4 with issue #10 (May 2006).[4] Reis left Green Lantern after issue #38 (March 2009) to draw the Blackest Night limited series (June 2009 – May 2010)[5] and its follow-up limited series Brightest Day (July 2010 - June 2011).[6][7] Reis was the regular penciller of writer Geoff Johns' run on Aquaman vol. 7, which premiered in September 2011. Reis drew it for the first 13 issues before moving to Justice League where he replaced Jim Lee.[8][9] Johns and Reis introduced the Crime Syndicate of America into the New 52 continuity in Justice League #23 (Oct. 2013).[10] Reis drew the first issue of Grant Morrison's The Multiversity in 2014.[11]

Bibliography[edit]

Interior art (except where noted) includes:

Chaos! Comics[edit]

  • Lady Death:
    • Alive #2 (with Brian Pulido, 2001)
    • Dark Alliance #1–3 (with writer John Ostrander, 2002)
    • Jade #1 (with writer Brian Augustyn, 2002)
    • Judgement War #3 (with writers Brian Pulido and Len Kaminski, 2000)
    • Last Rites #4 (with writer John Ostrander, 2002)
    • The Rapture #2–3 (with writers Brian Pulido and Len Kaminski, 1999)

CrossGen[edit]

  • Lady Death: A Medieval Tale #1–6 (with writer Brian Pulido, 2003)
  • Crux #21 (2003)

Dark Horse Comics[edit]

DC Comics[edit]

  • Action Comics (Lana Lang) #812; (Superman) #813–819, 822–825 (with writer Chuck Austen, 2004–05)
  • Aquaman vol. 7 #1–13, #0 (with writer Geoff Johns, 2011–12)
  • The Authority vol. 3 #9 (backup story, with writer Christos Gage, 2009)
  • Batman vol. 3 #6 (2016)
  • Blackest Night, miniseries, #0–8 (with writer Geoff Johns, 2009–10)
  • Blackest Night: Tales of the Corps, miniseries, #3 (with writer Geoff Johns, 2009)
  • Brightest Day #1–14, 16–24 (with writers Geoff Johns and Peter Tomasi, among other artists, 2010–11)
  • Countdown to Infinite Crisis #1 (with writer Geoff Johns, 2005)
  • Cyborg #1–6 (with writer David F. Walker, 2015–16)
  • DC Comics – The New 52 FCBD Special Edition #1 (among other artists, 2012)
  • DC Comics: The New 52 Zero Omnibus (cover art, 2012)
  • DC Universe #0 (among other artists) (2008)
  • DC Universe: Rebirth #1 (among other artists; & variant cover artist first printing, 2016)
  • DCU Holiday Special #1 (among other artists) (2009)
  • 52 #22 (Green Lantern backup story, with writer Mark Waid, 2006); #51 (Justice League backup story, with writer Mark Waid, 2007)
  • Green Lantern vol. 4 #10–17, 21–25, 29–38, Super Spectacular (with writer Geoff Johns, 2006–11)
  • Infinite Crisis, miniseries, #4–7 (among other artists) (2005–06)
  • Infinite Crisis Special: Rann–Thanagar War #1 (with writer Dave Gibbons, 2006)
  • The Invisibles vol. 2 #18 (with writer Grant Morrison, 2000)
  • Justice League vol. 2 #8, 12, 15–17, 19, 22–24, 26–28, 30, 35 (with writer Geoff Johns, 2012–14)
  • Justice League of America, vol. 4, #25 (with writer Dwayne McDuffie, among other artists, 2008)
  • Justice League of America, vol. 5, #1, 4, 12–14 (2017)
  • Justice League of America: The Atom - Rebirth #1 (cover art, 2017)
  • Justice League of America: Vixen - Rebirth #1 (cover art, 2017)
  • Justice League of America: The Ray - Rebirth #1 (cover art, 2017)
  • Justice League of America: Killer Frost- Rebirth #1 (cover art, 2017)
  • Kamandi Challenge #5 (with writer Bill Willingham, 2017)
  • The Multiversity #1–2 (with writer Grant Morrison, 2014–15)
  • Rann–Thanagar War, miniseries, #1–6, Special #1 (with writer Dave Gibbons, 2005–06)
  • Superman vol. 2 #223 (with writer Mark Verheiden, 2006)
  • Superman vol. 4 #14 (2017)
  • Superman/Batman: Secret Files 2003 (with writer Geoff Johns)
  • Teen Titans/Outsiders Secret Files 2003 (with writer Geoff Johns)
  • Teen Titans/Legion Special #1 (with writers Geoff Johns and Mark Waid, 2004)
  • Untold Tales of Blackest Night #1 (among other artists) (2010)
  • WildCATS vol. 2 #9 (backup story, with writer Christos Cage, 2009)

Marvel Comics[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Geoff Johns Conquers the Universe". Comic-Con Magazine. San Diego Comic-Con International: 11. Winter 2010. 
  2. ^ Ivan Reis at the Grand Comics Database
  3. ^ Irvine, Alex (2008). "The Invisibles". In Dougall, Alastair. The Vertigo Encyclopedia. London, United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. pp. 92–97. ISBN 0-7566-4122-5. OCLC 213309015. 
  4. ^ Rogers, Vaneta (October 9, 2009). "Reis of the Black Lanterns: Ivan Talks Blackest Night". Newsarama. Archived from the original on December 8, 2013. 
  5. ^ Cowsill, Alan; Dolan, Hannah, ed. (2010). "2000s". DC Comics Year By Year A Visual Chronicle. London, United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. p. 339. ISBN 978-0-7566-6742-9. Artist Ivan Reis handled the vast array of characters with amazing skill, bringing out the emotional core of Johns' brilliant script. 
  6. ^ Rogers, Vaneta (February 19, 2009). "Ivan Reis: Preparing for Blackest Night". Newsarama. Archived from the original on December 8, 2013. 
  7. ^ Cowsill "2000s" in Dolan, p. 341: "Cowritten by Geoff Johns and Peter J. Tomasi, and illustrated by Ivan Reis, Patrick Gleason, Ardian Syaf, Scott Clark, and Joe Prado, Brightest Day was the start of the next chapter in the history of the DC Universe."
  8. ^ Johnston, Rich (August 14, 2012). "Ivan Reis To Move From Aquaman To Justice League?". Bleeding Cool. Archived from the original on August 17, 2012. 
  9. ^ Johnston, Rich (August 20, 2012). "Geoff Johns To Leave Aquaman With Ivan Reis". Bleeding Cool. Archived from the original on October 24, 2012. 
  10. ^ Manning, Matthew K.; Dougall, Alastair, ed. (2014). "2010s". Batman: A Visual History. London, United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. p. 338. ISBN 978-1465424563. Writer Geoff Johns and artist Ivan Reis unveiled the true masterminds between the recent infighting among the various Justice Leagues. 
  11. ^ Rogers, Vaneta (August 21, 2014). "Vivisecting Multiversity With Ivan Reis & Joe Prado". Newsarama. Archived from the original on October 19, 2014. 

External links[edit]

  • Ivan Reis at the Comic Book DB
  • Ivan Reis at Mike's Amazing World of Comics
  • Ivan Reis at the Unofficial Handbook of Marvel Comics Creators
Preceded by
Karl Kerschl
Action Comics artist
2004–2005
Succeeded by
Ian Churchill
Preceded by
Ethan Van Sciver
Green Lantern vol. 4 artist
2006–2009
Succeeded by
Philip Tan
Preceded by
n/a
Aquaman vol. 7 artist
2011–2012
Succeeded by
Pere Perez