Jericho Brown

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jericho Brown
Jericho Brown reading at the 2023 National Book Festival
Jericho Brown reading at the 2023 National Book Festival
BornNelson Demery III
(1976-04-14) April 14, 1976 (age 47)
Shreveport, Louisiana, U.S.
Occupation
LanguageEnglish
EducationDillard University (BA)
University of New Orleans (MFA)
University of Houston (PhD)
GenrePoetry
Notable worksThe Tradition (2019)
Website
jerichobrown.com

Jericho Brown (born April 14, 1976) is an American poet and writer. Born and raised in Shreveport, Louisiana, Brown has worked as an educator at institutions such as the University of Houston, the University of San Diego, and Emory University. His poems have been published in The Nation, New England Review, The New Republic, Oxford American, and The New Yorker, among others. He released his first book of prose and poetry, Please, in 2008. His second book, The New Testament, was released in 2014. His 2019 collection of poems, The Tradition, garnered widespread critical acclaim.

Brown has won several accolades throughout his career, including a Whiting Award, an American Book Award, an Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, and the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry.[1][2]

Life[edit]

Born Nelson Demery III and raised in Shreveport, Louisiana, Brown later changed his name and graduated from Dillard University, where he was initiated as a member of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity, through the Beta Phi chapter, in the fall of 1995. He also graduated from the University of New Orleans with an MFA, and from the University of Houston with a Ph.D.[3]

Brown was a teaching fellow in the English department at the University of Houston from 2002 to 2007, a visiting professor at San Diego State University's MFA program in spring 2009, and an assistant professor of English at the University of San Diego. He has also taught at numerous conferences and workshops, including the Iowa Summer Writing Festival at the University of Iowa. He is an associate professor of English and director of the Creative Writing Program at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.[4] Previously, he worked as a speechwriter for the mayor of New Orleans.[5]

In 2011, Brown received the 2011 National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship for Poetry.[1] His poems have appeared in The Iowa Review, jubilat, The Nation, New England Review, The New Republic, Oxford American, The New Yorker, Enkare Review, and The Best American Poetry. He serves as an Assistant Editor at Callaloo.[6]

His first book, Please (New Issues Poetry & Prose, 2008), won the American Book Award.[7] His second book, a book of poetry titled The New Testament (Copper Canyon Press, 2014), won the 2015 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award.

Brown's third book, a collection of poems titled The Tradition (Copper Canyon Press, 2019), garnered widespread critical acclaim and won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry.[2]

Brown published his fourth book in 2023, How We Do it: Black Writers on Craft, Practice and Skill, an anthology of 31 essays and interviews from African American authors.[8]

Awards[edit]

Works[edit]

Articles[edit]

  • Brown, Jericho; Hall, James Allen (September 2009). "Danger by Desire: A Conversation between Jericho Brown & James Allen Hall". Boxcar Poetry Preview. No. 22. ISSN 1931-1761. Archived from the original on 15 June 2023. Retrieved July 9, 2023.
  • "The Long Distance Between Poems". Boston Review. Cambridge, Massachusetts. April 29, 2016. Retrieved July 10, 2023.

Interviews[edit]

Books[edit]

Poems[edit]

  • "Rick". AGNI. Boston University. March 2007. Archived from the original on February 19, 2009. Retrieved February 19, 2009.
  • "Pause". Prairie Schooner. 82 (1): 77–78. March 2008. doi:10.1353/psg.0.0009. S2CID 71881295. Retrieved July 10, 2023.
  • "The Buring Bush". Prairie Schooner. 82 (1): 78. March 2008. doi:10.1353/psg.0.0009. S2CID 71881295. Retrieved July 10, 2023.
  • "Herman Finley Is Dead". Prairie Schooner. 82 (1): 79–80. March 2008. doi:10.1353/psg.0.0009. S2CID 71881295. Retrieved July 10, 2023.
  • "To Be Seen". The Missouri Review. University of Missouri. April 30, 2008. Archived from the original on February 9, 2023. Retrieved July 8, 2023.
  • "Elegy". Rumpus Magazine. May 16, 2009. Archived from the original on December 2, 2022. Retrieved July 8, 2023.
  • "Thrive". oxfordamerican.org. Oxford American. October 2, 2014. Archived from the original on November 29, 2014. Retrieved July 8, 2023.
  • "N'em'". The New York Times. New York City, New York (published April 19, 2015). April 17, 2015. p. 23. Archived from the original on January 9, 2022. Retrieved July 10, 2023. The colloquialism of the title, which means "and them" — as in "Tell your mama 'n'em I said hello" — encompasses a host of people made familiar by the world of the poem. Most of us have known them: elders and distant ancestors whose way of being was rooted in the wisdom of folk knowledge, a generation now all but gone. Poem selected by Natasha Trethewey.
  • Armleder, John; Brown, Jericho (February 25, 2016). "An Artist and a Poet on Coupling". T. New York City, New York: The New York Times (published March 6, 2016). p. 114. For T's ongoing series, the Swiss performance artist, painter and sculptor John Armleder created a response to a poem by Jericho Brown, 2015 winner of the Ainsfield-Wolf Book Award for Poetry.
  • "Night Shift". The New Yorker. New York City, New York (published April 9, 2018). April 2, 2018. Archived from the original on June 3, 2023. Retrieved July 10, 2023.
  • "The Rabbits". What Nature. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Boston Review. April 20, 2018. Retrieved July 10, 2023.
  • "Foreday in the Morning". Time. New York City, New York: Time USA, LLC. (published August 8, 2018). July 26, 2018. Archived from the original on April 12, 2023. Retrieved July 10, 2023.
  • "Dark". The New York Times. New York City, New York (published January 20, 2019). January 17, 2019. p. 21. Retrieved July 10, 2023. In this charming yet sobering lyric, Jericho Brown confronts his own image as a black man — what those on the outside imagine they see, and what he can't help carrying inside, locked from view. Driven by the lilt of the blues (ghosted in the buried rhymes of books/looks, concern/earn, blue/new, cracked/black), the layers multiply and intersect with sad, irrefutable logic. A relentless dismantling of identity, a difficult jewel of a poem: painfully candid one minute, in your face the next — and as we approach Martin Luther King Jr. Day, still distressingly apropos. Selected by Rita Dove
  • "Say Thank You Say I'm Sorry". The New York Times. New York City, New York (published June 21, 2020). June 15, 2020. p. 19. Archived from the original on March 24, 2023. Retrieved July 9, 2023. The Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Jericho Brown writes for the Book Review about life during the pandemic.
  • "Inaugural". The New York Times Magazine. Illustration by Rob Sato. New York City, New York. January 20, 2021. Retrieved July 10, 2023. By Jericho Brown, winner of the 2020 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry, on the occasion of the inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris.{{cite magazine}}: CS1 maint: others (link)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "National Endowment for the Arts 2011 Poetry Fellows". Archived from the original on November 27, 2010.
  2. ^ a b c "2020 Pulitzer Prizes". The Pulitzer Prizes. May 4, 2020. Archived from the original on July 30, 2020. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  3. ^ "Jericho Brown". Academy of American Poets. Archived from the original on 12 March 2013. Retrieved 18 March 2013.
  4. ^ "Jericho Brown". poets.org. June 15, 2010. Archived from the original on June 12, 2017. Retrieved April 10, 2017.
  5. ^ Kellaway, Kate (July 28, 2018). "Jericho Brown: "Poetry is a veil in front of a heart beating at a fast pace"". The Guardian. Archived from the original on December 20, 2019. Retrieved January 14, 2020.
  6. ^ "Jericho Brown". The Missouri Review. Archived from the original on February 6, 2013. Retrieved December 5, 2013.
  7. ^ "Wmich.edu". Archived from the original on November 29, 2014. Retrieved November 20, 2014.
  8. ^ "HOW WE DO IT | Kirkus Reviews" – via Kirkus Reviews.
  9. ^ "Emory poet and professor Jericho Brown wins prestigious Anisfield-Wolf Book Award | Emory University | Atlanta GA". news.emory.edu. Emory University. Archived from the original on 2023-01-27. Retrieved 2023-07-11.
  10. ^ Rich, Motoko (October 29, 2009). "Whiting Prizes Awarded to Emerging Writers". The New York Times. Archived from the original on July 11, 2023. Retrieved July 11, 2023 – via NYTimes.com.
  11. ^ Anderson, Lexi (November 13, 2018). "Why Everyone Needs to Read Jericho Brown's 'Please'". Study Breaks. Pratt University. Archived from the original on July 11, 2023. Retrieved July 11, 2023.
  12. ^ Teicher, Craig Morgan (October 18, 2014). "A Collection Of Poems That Offers An Unlikely Kind Of Hope". NPR. Archived from the original on July 10, 2023. Retrieved July 10, 2023.
  13. ^ Phillips, Maya (April 2, 2019). "A Poetic Body of Work Grapples With the Physical Body at Risk". The New York Times. New York City, New York. Archived from the original on July 10, 2023. Retrieved July 10, 2023.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]