Jim Peelle

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Jim Peelle
James Peele.png
Biographical details
Born(1907-06-12)June 12, 1907
Illinois
DiedOctober 17, 1976(1976-10-17) (aged 69)
Buffalo, New York
Playing career
Football
1931–1933Purdue
Position(s)Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1934–1935Buffalo (assistant)
1936–1947Buffalo
Baseball
1949Buffalo
1952–1967Buffalo
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1936–1969Buffalo
Head coaching record
Overall38–34–1 (football)
177–66 (baseball)

James E. Peelle (June 12, 1907 – October 17, 1976) was an American football player, coach of football and baseball, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at the University at Buffalo from 1936 to 1947, compiling a record of 38–34–1. Peelle was also the head baseball coach at Buffalo in 1949 and from 1952 to 1967, tallying a mark of 177–66. A native of Staunton, Illinois, Peelle played college football as a quarterback at Purdue University. He came to Buffalo 1934 as an assistant football coach under George Van Bibber and succeeded him as head football coach and athletic director in 1936.[1] Peelle remained athletic director until 1969.[2] He died on October 17, 1976, in Buffalo, New York.[3]

Head coaching record[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Buffalo Bulls (Independent) (1936–1947)
1936 Buffalo 5–3
1937 Buffalo 4–4
1938 Buffalo 2–6
1939 Buffalo 0–7
1940 Buffalo 3–5
1941 Buffalo 3–4–1
1942 Buffalo 6–2
1943 No team—World War II
1944 No team—World War II
1945 No team—World War II
1946 Buffalo 6–2
1947 Buffalo 8–1
Buffalo: 38–34–1
Total: 38–34–1

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Peele Will Take Vanbibber's Berth". The Indianapolis Star. Indianapolis, Indiana. Associated Press. June 11, 1936. p. 18. Retrieved February 9, 2019 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  2. ^ "More work for Deming". The Oneonta Star. Oneonta, New York. Associated Press. January 9, 1970. p. 11. Retrieved February 9, 2019 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  3. ^ "sports shorts; Miscellaneous". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. St. Louis, Missouri. October 18, 1976. p. 8B. Retrieved February 9, 2019 – via Newspapers.com open access.