John Carter Rose

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John Carter Rose (April 27, 1861 – March 26, 1927) was a United States federal judge.

Born in Baltimore, Maryland, Rose received an LL.B. from the University of Maryland School of Law in 1882 and entered private practice in Baltimore. He also worked as an editorial writer for the Baltimore Sun. He was a supervisor of the 1890 census in Baltimore. He was the United States Attorney for the District of Maryland from 1898 to 1910.

On March 25, 1910, Rose was nominated by President William H. Taft to a new seat on the United States District Court for the District of Maryland created by 36 Stat. 201. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on April 4, 1910, and received his commission the same day.

On December 9, 1922, President Warren G. Harding nominated Rose for elevation to a new seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit created by 42 Stat. 837, 840. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 20, 1922, and received his commission the same day. Rose served in that capacity until his death, in 1927, in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Sources[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
new seat
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Maryland
1910–1922
Succeeded by
Morris Ames Soper
Preceded by
new seat
Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit
1922-1927
Succeeded by
Elliott Northcott