Kainaliu, Hawaii

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Kainaliu, Hawaii
Aloha Theater built in 1932
Aloha Theater built in 1932
Coordinates: 19°31′56″N 155°55′35″W / 19.53222°N 155.92639°W / 19.53222; -155.92639
CountryUnited States
StateHawaii
CountyHawaii
Elevation
1,394 ft (425 m)
Time zoneUTC-10 (Hawaii-Aleutian)
ZIP code
96750
Area code(s)808
GNIS feature ID359919

Kainaliu is a small community in Hawaiʻi County, Hawaiʻi, United States.

Geography[edit]

Kainaliu is located in the Kona district at coordinates19°31′56″N 155°55′35″W / 19.53222°N 155.92639°W / 19.53222; -155.92639Coordinates: 19°31′56″N 155°55′35″W / 19.53222°N 155.92639°W / 19.53222; -155.92639, along the Hawaii Belt Road, also called the Māmalahoa Highway or state route 11.[1] For demographic information, see the census-designated places of Honalo, Hawaii to the north or Kealakekua, Hawaii to the south.

History[edit]

The town was named for an ancient canoe bailer who worked for King Keawenuiaʻumi in the sixteenth century,[2][3] from kā i nā liu in the Hawaiian language. It was also the site of an early coffee farm of Governor Kuakini.[4]

The historic Lanikila Congregational church was built here in 1865−67.[5] Its founder Rev. John Davis Paris (1809–1892) and his family are buried in the cemetery.[6] The church was built on the land of William Johnson, who would marry the grandnephew of Isaac Davis, and have a daughter who married the son of Rev. Paris, and another who married wealthy businessman William Herbert Shipman.[7]

In 1868, the self-proclaimed prophet Joseph Kaona convinced a band of followers the world would soon end. They tried to take over Lanikila church, then formed a communal camp on the beach. After the loss of two lives, they were captured and briefly imprisoned.[8]

In 1932 the Tanimoto Theater opened here, showing both American and Japanese films for workers in the Kona coffee industry.[9] It was designed by William Harold Lee, and seated 325.[10] After World War II the name was to Aloha Theater. It was shut down in the 1970s, but restored and re-opened, playing mostly live events. It is the oldest theater in Kona that is still operating.[11] The theater now houses a restaurant and since 2003 has been the home of the Aloha Performing Arts Company.[12]

The Kona Research Station of the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources of the University of Hawaii is located here.[13] Although a trail originally led to a small settlement at the beach, the road was moved uphill to accommodate the growing traffic through the coffee-producing region. The two-lane road is now often congested, resulting in what locals call the "Kainaliu crawl". An attempt to open a bypass highway in 2000 was stalled by lawsuits,[14] but a portion was opened in 2009.[15] The legal challenge to the rest of the new highway had risen to the Supreme Court of Hawaii.[16] The road was a condition of the Hōkūliʻa development of a golf course and vacation home development near the shoreline.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Kainaliu, Hawaii
  2. ^ "Shore Diving Kealakekua Bay Hawaii". Hawaii's Kona Coast Divers. Retrieved 2009-11-11.
  3. ^ "The Pesticide Label" (PDF). Hawaii (Official Site). Retrieved 2009-11-11.
  4. ^ Lloyd J. Soehren (2004). "lookup of Kainaliu". on Hawaiian place names. Ulukau, the Hawaiian Electronic Library. Retrieved 2009-11-06.
  5. ^ "Lanakila Congregational Church". Hawaii Conference UCC. Archived from the original on 2007-08-10. Retrieved 2009-11-06.
  6. ^ Geoff Stafford (July 3, 2002). "Lanakila Congregational Church cemetery". USGenWeb Archives. Retrieved 2009-10-17.
  7. ^ Emmett Cahill (1996). The Shipmans of East Hawaii. University of Hawai'i Press. p. 240. ISBN 0-8248-1680-3.
  8. ^ Jean Greenwell (1987). "Crisis in Kona". Hawaiian Journal of History. 21: 67–76. hdl:10524/166.
  9. ^ Bobby Command (November 20, 2007). "Aloha Theatre celebrates 75 years". West Hawaii Today. Retrieved 2009-11-08.
  10. ^ "Aloha Theater". Cinema Treasures web site. Retrieved 2009-11-06.
  11. ^ "History". Aloha Theater official web site. Retrieved 2009-11-06.
  12. ^ "Aloha Performing Arts Company". official web site. Retrieved 2009-11-06.
  13. ^ "Locations of CTAHR Cooperative Extension Offices and Research Stations". official web site. University of Hawaii. Retrieved 2009-11-06.
  14. ^ Erin Miller (March 4, 2009). "Judge rules against landowner; Coupe case could be appealed all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, says attorney". West Hawaii Today. Retrieved 2009-11-08.
  15. ^ Bobby Command (March 4, 2009). "Mamalahoa bypass trial use begins". West Hawaii Today. Retrieved 2009-11-08.
  16. ^ Erin Miller (May 19, 2009). "Ruling clears bypass roadblock". West Hawaii Today. Retrieved 2009-11-08.
  17. ^ "Hōkūliʻa". official web site.