Kibworth

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Coordinates: 52°32′N 1°00′W / 52.54°N 1°W / 52.54; -1

St Wilfrid's Church, Kibworth Harcourt

Kibworth /ˈkɪbwərθ/ is an area of the Harborough district of Leicestershire, England, that contains two civil parishes: the villages of Kibworth Beauchamp /ˈbəm/ and Kibworth Harcourt /ˈhɑːrkɔːrt/. At the 2011 census, Kibworth Beauchamp had a population of 5,433 and Kibworth Harcourt 990. The villages are divided by the Midland Main Line. Kibworth is close to Foxton Locks, Market Harborough, and Leicester.

History[edit]

Kibworth Beauchamp High Street

In 1270 Walter de Merton, the founder of Merton College, Oxford, bought a large part of the parish of Kibworth Harcourt from Saer de Harcourt, who had been forced to sell the estate after giving his support to the unsuccessful "Second Barons' War" led by Simon de Montfort. Much of the parish has remained the property of Merton College, Oxford to the present day. There is a stained-glass window depicting Walter de Merton in the bell tower of the parish church, St Wilfrid's, of which the warden and scholars of the college are joint patrons with the Bishop of Leicester.[citation needed] The church is a Grade II* listed building.

A village school was founded in 1709, and endowed by Sir Nathaniel Edwards.

Kibworth Harcourt was the birthplace of the writer/reformer Anna Laetitia Barbauld (1743–1825) and her brother John Aikin. Their father, John Aikin (1713–1780), kept a dissenting academy there and served as minister of a nearby Presbyterian chapel. The family moved in 1757 to Warrington.

On 23 July 1825 the ancient tower and spire of St Wilfrid's collapsed.[1]

Michael Wood's Story of England[edit]

In September 2010, Kibworth was the central feature of Michael Wood's Story of England, a documentary aired on both BBC Four, BBC Two, and repeated on the UKTV channel Yesterday, and PBS America, presented by Michael Wood about the history of England framed through Kibworth.[2][3]

A book of the same name was published by Viking.[4] The series was likened to Who Do You Think You Are? for a whole community. Villagers (Kibworth Improvement Team - KiT) have created a new website[5] and successfully requested a grant of £48,200 from the Heritage Lottery Fund to continue the legacy of the TV series by creating a Kibworth Guide Booklet (heritage trails for Kibworth Harcourt, Kibworth Beauchamp and Smeeton Westerby), several interpretation panels around the three villages, ongoing study materials for the three tiers of local schools, and an Archive (Virtual Museum).

Facilities[edit]

Kibworth has a number of shops, a community newspaper (The Kibworth & District Chronicle),[6] and since 2002 new shops, including a branch of the Co-Op.[7] New housing continues to be built on the edge of the village, causing periodic controversy.[8]

The Bookshop, which opened in the High Street in 2009, won a regional award for Independent Bookseller of The Year in 2012.[9]

Transport[edit]

Arriva Midlands operates Sapphire route X3 between Leicester and Market Harborough and Stagecoach Midlands route X7 between Leicester and Northampton, both via the village.[10][11] The Midland Main Line runs through the area, but Kibworth railway station, which served both villages, closed in 1968.[12]

Sports[edit]

The local cricket club won the ECB National Club Cricket Championship in 2004.[13]

The association football club, previously Kibworth and Smeeton, was renamed in 2018 as Kibworth Town, merging the younger and senior teams together. The village also has clubs for snooker, tennis, golf, bowls and dance.[citation needed]

Kibworth is also home to Kibworth Rugby Stars, a children's rugby club serving ages 18 months to 6 years.[14]

Kibworth Harcourt Mill in 2006

Kibworth Harcourt Mill[edit]

The mill, a Grade 2* listed structure, last worked in the 1930s and until 1936 was owned by Merton College, Oxford, then ownership and responsibility was transferred to the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB). As of March 2022, restoration costing £350,000 is close to completion. With parts dating from "at least 1711", it is last surviving post mill in Leicestershire county.[15][16][17]

Notable residents[edit]

In birth order:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Extract from The Gentleman,s Magazine, August 1825: Kibworth Rectory, 27 July 1825 at stwilfs.freeserve.co.uk". Archived from the original on 15 February 2012. Retrieved 17 September 2011.
  2. ^ BBC coverage of Michael Wood's Story of England
  3. ^ "Coverage of Michael Wood's Story of England at thisisleicestershire.co.uk". Archived from the original on 9 October 2010. Retrieved 16 September 2010.
  4. ^ Michael Wood, The Story of England, Viking Penguin, 2010 (ISBN 978-0-670-91903-1).
  5. ^ Official website for the village of Kibworth
  6. ^ Sheridan Gilley, "Knox, Ronald Arbuthnott (1888–1957)", ODNB, Oxford University Press, 2004 Retrieved 8 September 2014, pay-walled.
  7. ^ Co-op Retrieved 4 December 2015. Archived 8 December 2015 at the Wayback Machine
  8. ^ Harborough Mail Retrieved 4 December 2015.
  9. ^ Bookshop site Retrieved 4 December 2015.
  10. ^ Arriva Retrieved 4 December 2015.
  11. ^ Stagecoach Retrieved 4 December 2015
  12. ^ R. V. J. Butt, The Directory of Railway Stations (Yeovil: Patrick Stephens, 1995).
  13. ^ ECB National Club Championship (7 September 2004). "National Stage - 2004". ECB Play Cricket. Retrieved 7 June 2019.
  14. ^ Club site. Retrieved 11 July 2019.
  15. ^ Kibworth Harcourt Mill, Langton Road Historic England. Retrieved 12 March 2022
  16. ^ Kibworth Harcourt mill restoration project nears finish BBC News, 12 March 2022. Retrieved 12 March 2022
  17. ^ Kibworth Harcourt Mill Project spab.org.uk Retrieved 12 March 2022
  18. ^ Diana K. Jones, "Aikin, John (1713–1780)", ODNB, Oxford University Press, 2004 Retrieved 8 September 2014, pay-walled.
  19. ^ William McCarthy, "Barbauld, Anna Letitia (1743–1825)", ODNB, Oxford University Press, 2004 Retrieved 8 September 2014, pay-walled.
  20. ^ Marilyn L. Brooks, "Aikin, John (1747–1822)", ODNB, Oxford University Press, 2004 Retrieved 8 September 2014, pay-walled.
  21. ^ [Anon.], "Beresford, James (1764–1840)", rev. H. C. G. Matthew, ODNB, Oxford University Press, 2004 Retrieved 8 September 2014, pay-walled.
  22. ^ Award Retrieved 11 April 2016.
  23. ^ Stephen Gregory, "Knox, Edmund Arbuthnott (1847–1937)", ODNB, Oxford University Press, 2004 Retrieved 8 September 2014, pay-walled.
  24. ^ "1905. Samuel Perkins Pick FRIBA 1905-06". Leicester Literary and Philosophical Society. LLPS. Retrieved 11 April 2016.
  25. ^ Obituary. Retrieved 8 September 2014.
  26. ^ Natalie K. Watson, "Knox, Wilfred Lawrence (1886–1950)", ODNB, Oxford University Press, 2004 Retrieved 8 September 2014, pay-walled.
  27. ^ Sheridan Gilley, "Knox, Ronald Arbuthnott (1888–1957)", ODNB, Oxford University Press, 2004 Retrieved 8 September 2014, pay-walled.
  28. ^ "Harold Ridley". www.oxforddnb.com. Retrieved 28 January 2016.

External links[edit]