Kosmos 159

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Background[edit]

Kosmos 159 was one of many satellites designed during the Soviet Space Program given the designation Kosmos (satellite). This satellite was specifically designed to be a high orbit satellite used to gain information on trajectory anomalies caused by the moon's gravitational pull. This data would have been vital to the Soviet space program and could have been key in successful manned missions to the moon. This mission was also used to test radio communications in space.[1]

Kosmos 159 launched May 16, 1967 and although the satellite had been designed for high orbit, the main thruster cut out too early, causing the satellite to only reach lower orbit.[2] Space historian Asif Siddiqi speculated that even though this mission was a failure, Soviet scientists were still able to use Kosmos 159 for its intended purpose. Kosmos 159 fell back to earth November 11, 1967.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zelenyi, L. M., A. V. Zakharov, and O. V. Zakutnyaya. "Will the Lunar Renaissance Come Forth?" Solar System Research 45.7 (2011): 697-704. ProQuest. 15 Apr. 2016 .
  2. ^ Siddiqi, Asif A. "Deep Space Chronicle a Chronology of Deep Space and Planetary Probes, 1958-2000." Monographs in Aerospace History 24 (2002): 63-64. Web. 10 Apr. 2016. <https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20020052429.pdf>.
  3. ^ Siddiqi, Asif A. "Deep Space Chronicle a Chronology of Deep Space and Planetary Probes, 1958-2000." Monographs in Aerospace History 24 (2002): 63-64. Web. 10 Apr. 2016. <https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20020052429.pdf>.