LaPorte Church of Christ

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LaPorte Church of Christ is an independent church in Laporte, Colorado, led until 2011 by Pastor Peter J. Peters (November 13, 1946 – July 7, 2011), who proclaimed that Europeans comprise the twelve lost tribes of Israel and that contemporary Jews are satanic impostors (based on Revelation 2:9 and 3:9) and the descendants of the Biblical Esau (Edom) -- the brother and nemesis of Jacob (Israel). Critics labeled his message to be that of Christian Identity,[1] although he rejected this label.[2] Peters and his church are not associated with the decentralized group of churches that use the name "Churches of Christ".

The church served mainly as a platform for Peters' views and its membership never went above about 100. It attracted white supremacists, including the members of terrorist organisation The Order who murdered radio talk show host Alan Berg with whom Peters had clashed on Berg's radio program..[3]

The church became involved in a controversy in Colorado which led to it being fined for a minor violation of election laws. Peters refused to pay the fine and the church was sized by the state in February 1993.[4]

Peter J. Peters[edit]

Peter J. Peters was born and raised in Western Nebraska. After graduating from the University of Nebraska School of Agriculture, he earned a BSc from the Colorado State University in agricultural business and economics. After retiring from the USDA, he enrolled at the Church of Christ Bible Training School in Gering, Nebraska, where he was given a baccalaureate degree after three years of study.

He subsequently became the pastor of the LaPorte Church of Christ in LaPorte, Colorado and established Scriptures for America, a world-wide outreach ministry to evangelize by means of shortwave radio broadcasts, the mailing of audiotapes, CDs, and DVDs, his Dragonslayer Newsletter and eventually by web-casting via the website ScripturesforAmerica.org.

On July 7, 2011, Peters died in his home of natural causes.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Anti-Defamation League. "Peter J. "Pete" Peters"
  2. ^ Scriptures for America. "Be Wise as Serpents--Reject the 'Identity' Label".
  3. ^ Atkins, Stephen E. (2011). Encyclopedia of Right-Wing Extremism in Modern American History. ABC-CLIO. p. 146-147. ISBN 978-1598843507. 
  4. ^ Kaplan, Jeffrey (2000). Encyclopedia of White Power: A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right. AltaMira Press. p. 241. ISBN 978-0742503403. 
  5. ^ "Pastor of LaPorte Church of Christ dies; preached 'virulently racist' message". 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°37′33″N 105°08′06″W / 40.62584°N 105.13496°W / 40.62584; -105.13496