La Loma Foods

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La Loma Foods
Formerly
Loma Linda Food Company, Loma Linda Foods
IndustryVegetarian and vegan food production
PredecessorThe Sanitarium Food Company, Worthington Foods, The Kellogg Company
SuccessorAtlantic Natural Foods Company
Founded1905
Headquarters,
United States
Area served
United States
ProductsMeat analogue products
Websiteatlanticnaturalfoods.com/brand/loma-linda

La Loma Foods, formerly named Loma Linda Food Company and Loma Linda Foods, and with products presently branded under the name Loma Linda and Loma, is a former food manufacturing company that produced vegetarian and vegan foods. It is presently an active brand of vegetarian and vegan food products produced and purveyed by the Atlantic Natural Foods Company of Nashville, North Carolina. Loma Linda Foods began operations in 1905 under the name The Sanitarium Food Company and was owned by the Seventh-day Adventist Church until 1990.

Overview[edit]

La Loma Foods is a former food manufacturing company and brand presently owned by Atlantic Natural Foods Company, based in Nashville, North Carolina, that manufactures and purveys vegetarian and vegan foods.[1][2] Food products are presently branded under the name "Loma Linda" by the Atlantic Natural Foods Company.[3] The company was previously owned by the Seventh-day Adventist Church[4][5] and Worthington Foods. The company began operations in 1905 under the name The Sanitarium Food Company, and produced crackers, breads and cookies.[6] Additional health foods were later produced by the company, such as the breakfast cereal Ruskets, and the company also expanded to produce infant formula and meat analogue products.[5][7]

At the time the Loma Linda Food Company was founded in 1933, it purveyed some of the first meat analogue products prepared from soy and wheat that were available in the United States on a commercial basis.[8] In the 1960s, Loma Linda Foods and Worthington Foods were the largest manufacturers of soy-based foods in the United States.[9] Foods purveyed under the present Loma Linda brand name include canned vegetarian/meat analogue products such as chili, taco filling and faux meats such as sausage, chicken, tuna, scallops and steak.[3][10]

History[edit]

Loma Linda Foods was preceded by the Loma Linda Sanitarium bakery, officially named The Sanitarium Food Company, which began operations in 1905 in Loma Linda, California.[4][5] The company under the name Loma Linda Food Company was created in 1933, at which time it opened a new production facility near Riverside, California.[4][5]

The company's name was changed to La Loma Foods in 1989,[4] and in 1989 the company sold its infant formula brand and line to N.V. Nutricia, a Dutch company.[5] The Seventh-day Adventist Church sold the company to Worthington Foods of Ohio in 1990, and Worthington Foods was acquired by The Kellogg Company in 1999.[1][11] The Kellogg Company sold the company to the Atlantic Natural Foods Company in 2015.[1][10][11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Loma Linda-Worthington Brand Given New Life by Atlantic Natural Foods Company". Adventist Today. January 7, 2015. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  2. ^ Schroeder, Eric (October 8, 2014). "Atlantic Natural Foods inks deal with Kellogg". Food Business News. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Loma Linda". Atlantic Natural Foods. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  4. ^ a b c d Land, G. (2014). Historical Dictionary of the Seventh-Day Adventists. Historical Dictionaries of Religions, Philosophies, and Movements Series. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. p. 201. ISBN 978-1-4422-4188-6.
  5. ^ a b c d e William Shurtleff, A.A. (2010). History of Soybeans and Soyfoods in Canada (1831–2010): Extensively Annotated Bibliography and Sourcebook. Soyinfo Center. p. 371. ISBN 978-1-928914-28-0.
  6. ^ "Loma Linda Foods". SoyInfo Center. 2004. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  7. ^ Shurtleff, W.; Aoyagi, A. (2014). History of Seventh-day Adventist Work with Soyfoods, Vegetarianism, Meat Alternatives, Wheat Gluten, Dietary Fiber and Peanut Butter (1863–2013): Extensively Annotated Bibliography and Sourcebook. Soyinfo Center. p. 905. ISBN 978-1-928914-64-8.
  8. ^ Connolly, Matt (July 26, 1999). "Timeline: A short history of fake meat". Mother Jones. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  9. ^ Braun, Whitny (April 6, 2016). "Meat Analogues: Just Like Your Adventist Mother Used to Make". The Huffington Post. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  10. ^ a b "Kellogg Sells Worthington and Loma Linda Brands". Spectrum Conversation. October 10, 2014. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  11. ^ a b Aoyagi, W.S.A. (2015). Origin and Early History of Peanut Butter (1884–2015): Extensively Annotated Bibliography and Sourcebook. Soyinfo Center. p. 418. ISBN 978-1-928914-72-3.