Lilienfeld Prize

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The Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize of the American Physical Society, to remember Julius Edgar Lilienfeld, has been awarded annually, since 1989. (It was not awarded in 2002). The purpose of the Prize is to recognize outstanding contributions to physics.

Recipients[edit]

Source: American Physical Society

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cortez, Marjorie (3 October 2017). "Want to win the Nobel Prize? Graduate from Logan High School". Deseret News. Retrieved 16 March 2018. 
  2. ^ Codinha, Alessandra (March 14, 2018). "Stephen Hawking Is Dead at Age 76". Vogue. Retrieved 16 March 2018. 
  3. ^ Ziabari, Kourosh (October 22, 2012). "I Want To Make The World A Better Place: Frank Wilczek By Kourosh Ziabari". CounterCurrents. Retrieved 16 March 2018. 
  4. ^ Elliott, Celia. "Campbell to share the 2010 Lilienfeld Prize". illinois.edu. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  5. ^ "Prize Recipient". havlin.biu.ac.il. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  6. ^ Powell, Alvin (20 October 2010). "Gabrielse wins Lilienfeld Prize". Harvard Gazette. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  7. ^ "Dr. Margaret Geller Awarded the 2013 APS Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize". Center for Astrophysics. October 25, 2012. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  8. ^ "Prof. Ed Ott Selected for 2014 Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize". www.ece.umd.edu. October 1, 2013. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  9. ^ Koppes, Steve (9 October 2014). "David Awschalom to receive 2015 Lilienfeld Prize from American Physical Society". UChicago News. Retrieved 30 June 2017. 
  10. ^ "American Physical Society honors SFI's David Pines with Lilienfeld Prize | Santa Fe Institute". www.santafe.edu. Sante Fe Institute. Retrieved 30 June 2017.