List of awards and nominations received by St. Elsewhere

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List of awards won by St. Elsewhere

William Daniels received many awards and nominations for his performance as Dr. Mark Craig

Totals
Awards won 24
Nominations 106
References

St. Elsewhere is an American television medical drama series created by Joshua Brand and John Falsey and produced by MTM Enterprises. The show originally aired in the United States on NBC between October 26, 1982 and May 25, 1988, with 137 episodes split over six seasons. The series follows the day-to-day life of the staff at St. Eligius Hospital, which is nicknamed "St. Elsewhere" for housing the rejects of the more prestigious hospitals.

St. Elsewhere amassed 106 nominations for various industry awards. This includes 62 Emmy awards (with 13 wins), 5 Golden Globe awards, 7 TCA awards (with one win), 4 Q awards (with three wins), 7 Directors Guild of America awards (one win) and 7 Writers Guild of America awards (one win). William Daniels, who portrayed Dr. Mark Craig, received the most awards and nominations, winning two Emmy Awards and two Q awards.

ACE Eddie Awards[edit]

Presented since 1962, the Eddie Award is an annual accolade that was created by American Cinema Editors to award outstanding achievements in editing in television and film.[1] St. Elsewhere received three nominations for the award for Best Edited Episode from a Television Series, winning twice for episodes edited by Robert P. Suppey.

Year Category Nominee Episode Result Ref.
1986 Best Edited Episode from a Television Series Robert P. Suppey "Haunted" Won [2]
1987 John Heath "Afterlife" Nominated [3]
1988 Robert P. Suppey "The Idiot and the Odyssey" Won [4]

Artios Awards[edit]

Presented by the Casting Society of America, the Artios Award is an annual accolades honoring outstanding achievements in casting.[5] St. Elsewhere received four nominations during its tenure, winning once in 1986.

Year Category Nominee Result Ref.
1985 Best Casting for TV, Comedy Episodic Eugene Blythe Nominated [6]
1986 Won [7]
1987 Nominated [8]
1988 Nominated [9]

Directors Guild of America Awards[edit]

The Directors Guild of America Award is an annual accolade presented by the Directors Guild of America (DGA) which awards outstanding achievements in the field of directing.[10] St. Elsewhere received five nominations during its tenure.

Year Category Nominee Episode Result Ref.
1985 Outstanding Directorial Achievement in a Drama Series David Anspaugh "Fade to White" Nominated [11]
Mark Tinker "Sweet Dreams" Nominated
1987 "Afterlife" Nominated [12]
1988 "Weigh In, Way Out" Nominated [13]
1989 "The Last One" Nominated [14]

Emmy Awards[edit]

Presented by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences since 1949, the Primetime Emmy Award is an annual accolade that honors outstanding achievements in various aspects of television such as acting, directing and writing.[15] St. Elsewhere received 62 nominations, winning thirteen awards.[16] William Daniels and Ed Flanders each received five nominations for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series, with Daniels winning twice and Flanders winning once. In the supporting actor categories, Doris Roberts and Bonnie Bartlett won for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series while James Coco won for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series. Ed Begley, Jr. was nominated for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series every year the series was broadcasting while Christina Pickles was nominated for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series five times. The series won the award for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series twice in 1984 and 1986 while winning in 1988 for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series.

The Creative Arts Emmy Award is a branch of the Primetime Emmy Awards that recognizes performances in technical areas in television such as cinematography, costume design, theme music and sound mixing. The series received 12 nominations in the area, winning three awards in 1986 for Outstanding Achievement in Costuming for a Series, Outstanding Art Direction for a Series, and Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama Series.

Primetime Emmy Awards[edit]

Doris Roberts won in 1983 for her role as Cora.
Alfre Woodard was nominated for Outstanding Lead Actress and Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series for her role as Dr. Roxanne Turner.
Christina Pickles was nominated five times for her performance on the series.
Year Category Nominee(s) Result Ref.
1983 Outstanding Drama Series Joshua Brand, John Falsey, John Masius, Bruce Paltrow, and Mark Tinker Nominated [17]
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series William Daniels Nominated [18]
Ed Flanders Won
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Ed Begley Jr. Nominated [19]
James Coco as Arnie for "The Abby Singer Show" "Cora and Arnie" Won
Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series Christina Pickles as Nurse Helen Rosenthal Nominated [20]
Doris Roberts as Cora for "The Abby Singer Show" "Cora and Arnie" Won
1984 Outstanding Drama Series Tom Fontana, John Masius, Bruce Paltrow, Abby Singer, and Mark Tinker Nominated [21]
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series William Daniels Nominated [22]
Ed Flanders Nominated
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Ed Begley Jr. Nominated [23]
Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series Piper Laurie as Fran Singleton for "Lust et Veritas" Nominated [24]
Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series Tom Fontana and John Masius for "All About Eve" Nominated [25]
John Ford Noonan, John Masius and Tom Fontana for "The Women" Won
John Masius, Tom Fontana, Garn Stephens, Emilie R. Small for "Newheart" Nominated
Mark Tinker, John Tinker, John Masius and Tom Fontana for "Qui Transulit Sustinet" Nominated
1985 Outstanding Drama Series Tom Fontana, John Masius, Bruce Paltrow, Abby Singer, and Mark Tinker Nominated [26]
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series William Daniels Won [27]
Ed Flanders Nominated
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Ed Begley Jr. Nominated [28]
Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series Christina Pickles Nominated [29]
Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series Tom Fontana, John Masius and Steve Bello for "Murder, She Rote" Nominated [30]
Tom Fontana and John Masius for "Sweet Dreams" Nominated
1986 Outstanding Drama Series Tom Fontana, John Masius, Bruce Paltrow, Abby Singer, and Mark Tinker Nominated [31]
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series William Daniels as Dr. Mark Craig for "Haunted" Won [32]
Ed Flanders as Dr. Donald Westphall Nominated
Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series Alfre Woodard as Dr. Roxanne Turner Nominated [33]
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Ed Begley Jr. Nominated [34]
Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series Christina Pickles Nominated [35]
Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series Charles H. Eglee, John Tinker, Channing Gibson, John Masius, and Tom Fontana for "Haunted" Nominated [36]
Tom Fontana, John Tinker, John Masius for "Time Heals" Won
1987 Outstanding Drama Series Tom Fontana, John Masius, Bruce Paltrow, Abby Singer, and Mark Tinker Nominated [37]
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series William Daniels Nominated [38]
Ed Flanders Nominated
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Ed Begley Jr. Nominated [39]
Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series Bonnie Bartlett as Ellen Craig Won [40]
Christina Pickles Nominated
Outstanding Guest Performer in a Drama Series Steve Allen as Lech Osoranski for "Visiting Daze" Nominated [41]
Edward Herrmann as Father Joseph McCabe for "Where There's Hope, There's Crosby" Nominated
Jayne Meadows as Holga Oseransky for "Visiting Daze" Nominated
Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series John Tinker, Tom Fontana, and John Masius for "Afterlife" Nominated [42]
1988 Outstanding Drama Series Channing Gibson, John Masius, Bruce Paltrow, Abby Singer, and Mark Tinker Nominated [43]
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Ed Begley Jr. Nominated [44]
Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series Bonnie Bartlett for "Their Town" Nominated [45]
Christina Pickles for "Down and Out of Beacon Hill" Nominated
Outstanding Guest Performer in a Drama Series Lainie Kazan as Frieda Fiscus for "The Abby Singer Show" Nominated [46]
Alfre Woodard for "The Abby Singer Show" Nominated
Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series Mark Tinker for "The Abby Singer Show" "Weigh In, Weigh Out" Won [47]
Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series Bruce Paltrow, Mark Tinker, Tom Fontana, John Tinker and Channing Gibson for "The Abby Singer Show" "The Last One" Nominated [48]

Creative Arts Emmy Awards[edit]

Year Category Nominee(s) Episode Result Ref.
1983 Outstanding Art Direction for a Series Ernie Bishop, Michele Guiol, James Hulsey, and Jacqueline Webber "Pilot" Nominated [49]
Outstanding Film Sound Editing for a Series Don Ernst, Avram Gold, Jere Goling, Sam Horta, Constance Kazmer and Gary Krivacek "Working" Nominated [50]
Outstanding Film Sound Mixing for a Series John B. Asman, William Nicholson, Ken S. Polk and Dean S. Vernon "The Count" Nominated [51]
1984 Outstanding Achievement in Music Composition for a Series (Dramatic Underscore) J. A. C. Redford "In Sickness and Health" Nominated [52]
Outstanding Art Direction for a Series Patricia S. Bruner and Jacqueline Webber "After Dark" Nominated [53]
1985 Outstanding Film Sound Mixing for a Series John B. Asman, William Nicholson, Ken S. Polk and Dean S. Vernon "Sweet Dreams" Nominated [54]
Outstanding Music Composition for a Series (Dramatic Underscore) J. A. C. Redford "Fade to White" Nominated [55]
1986 Outstanding Achievement in Costuming for a Series Charles Drayman, Robert M. Moore, Kathy O'Rear, Susan Smith-Nashold and Anne Winsor "Time Heals" Won [56]
Outstanding Art Direction for a Series Norman Rockett and Jacqueline Webber Won [57]
Outstanding Film Sound Editing for a Series Mark Crookston, Dan Garde, Andrew Horta, Constance Kazner, Brian F. Mars, John Robinson and Kevin Spears "Time Heals", Part I Nominated [58]
Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama Series William Gazecki, Andrew MacDonald, Bill Nicholson and Blake Wilcox "Time Heals", Part II Won [59]
1987 Outstanding Editing for a Series (Single Camera Production) John Heath "Afterlife" Nominated [60]

Golden Globe Awards[edit]

Ed Begley, Jr. was nominated for a Golden Globe in 1986

The Golden Globe Award is an annual accolade presented by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) which honors the best performances in television and film.[61] St. Elsewhere was nominated four consecutive times for Best Television Series – Drama while Ed Begley, Jr. was nominated once for Best Supporting Actor – Series, Miniseries or Television Film.

Year Category Nominee Result Ref.
1984 Best Television Series – Drama Nominated [62]
1985 Nominated [63]
Best Supporting Actor – Series, Miniseries or Television Film Ed Begley Jr. Nominated
1986 Best Television Series – Drama Nominated [64]
1987 Nominated [65]

Humanitas Prize[edit]

Awarded since 1974, the Humanitas Prize is an annual accolade that recognizes outstanding achievement of writers in film and television whose work promotes human dignity, meaning and freedom.[66] St. Elsewhere received seven nominations for the award in the 60 Minute Category, winning once in 1985.

Year Category Nominee(s) Episode Result Ref.
1983 60 Minute Category Tom Fontana (teleplay and story), John Falsey (story), Joshua Brand (story) "Rain" Nominated [67]
1984 John Masius and Tom Fontana "All About Eve" Nominated [68]
"Ties That Bind" Nominated
1985 John Masius and Tom Fontana Won [69]
1986 Channing Gibson (teleplay and story), John Masius (story), Tom Fontana (story) "Sanctuary" Nominated [70]
1987 "A Room with a View" Nominated [71]
John Masius and Tom Fontana "Where There's Hope, There's Crosby" Nominated

Peabody Awards[edit]

Awarded since 1940, the Peabody Award, named after American banker and philanthropist George Peabody, is an annual award the recognizes excellence in storytelling across mediums including television, radio, television networks, and online videos.[72] St. Elsewhere won the award for the year of 1984, with the award committee praising it as "distinguished television, set apart from other dramatic series by its depth of characterization, crisp and believable dialogue, and unusual variety in lighting, staging and photography."

Year Nominee Result Ref.
1984 NBC Television, MTM Enterprises Won [73]

People's Choice Awards[edit]

The People's Choice Awards are an annual awards show, presented since 1975, which recognize the people and work of popular culture.[74] St. Elsewhere won the award for Favorite New TV Dramatic Program in 1983.

Year Category Result Ref.
1983 Favorite New TV Dramatic Program Won [75]

Television Critics Association Awards[edit]

Awarded by Television Critics Association since 1985, the Television Critics Association Award (TCA Award) is an annual accolade that recognizes outstanding achievements in television programming and acting performances.[76] St. Elsewhere has received seven nominations—four for Outstanding Achievement in Drama and three for Program of the Year. The series won in 1988 for Outstanding Achievement in Drama.

Year Category Result Ref.
1985 Program of the Year Nominated [77]
Outstanding Achievement in Drama Nominated
1986 Nominated [78]
1987 Program of the Year Nominated [79]
Outstanding Achievement in Drama Nominated
1988 Program of the Year Nominated [80]
Outstanding Achievement in Drama Won

Viewers for Quality Television Awards[edit]

Husband and wife William Daniels and Bonnie Bartlett won 3 Q awards between them.

The Q Award, presented by the Viewers for Quality Television since 1986, recognizes critically acclaimed programs and performers for their outstanding achievements in television.[81] St. Elsewhere received four nominations, winning three awards—two for Best Actor in a Quality Drama Series, awarded to William Daniels, and one for Best Supporting Actress in a Quality Drama Series, awarded to Bonnie Bartlett.

Year Category Nominee Result Ref.
1986 Best Actor in a Quality Drama Series William Daniels Won [82]
1987 Won [83]
Best Supporting Actress in a Quality Drama Series Bonnie Bartlett Won
1988 Best Actor in a Quality Drama Series William Daniels Nominated [84]

Writers Guild of America Awards[edit]

Presented by the Writers Guild of America (WGA), the Writers Guild of America Award is an annual accolade that recognizes outstanding achievement of writers in film, television, radio, promotional writing and videogames.[85] St. Elsewhere received seven nominations for Television: Episodic Drama, winning once in 1986.

Year Category Nominee(s) Episode Result Ref.
1983 Television: Episodic Drama John Masius and Tom Fontana "Addiction" Nominated [86]
1984 John Ford Noonan (teleplay and story), John Masius (story) and Tom Fontana (story) "The Women" Nominated [87]
John Masius and Tom Fontana "Hello, Goodbye" Nominated
1985 John Masius and Tom Fontana "Sweet Dreams" Nominated [88]
1986 John Masius, Bruce Paltrow and Tom Fontana "Remembrance of Things Past" Won [89]
1987 Channing Gibson (teleplay and story), John Masius (story) and Tom Fontana (story) "A Room with a View" Nominated [90]
1988 Tom Fontana (teleplay and story), John Tinker (story) and Channing Gibson (story) "A Moon for the Misbegotten" Nominated [91]

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External links[edit]