Listed buildings in Northwich

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Northwich is a civil parish and a town in Cheshire West and Chester, England. It contains 36 buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as designated listed buildings. Two of these are listed at Grade I, the highest grade, and the rest at the lowest grade, Grade II; none are listed at the middle grade, Grade II*. The River Dane joins the River Weaver and the Weaver Navigation within the parish. Also passing through the parish are the A533 road, the Trent and Mersey Canal, and a railway built by the Cheshire Lines Committee. Many of the listed buildings are associated with these features.

Listed buildings that were originally designed for domestic use but later converted for other purposes include Winnington Hall,[1] and Hartford Manor.[2] Buildings still in domestic use include Rose Cottage,[3] Cassantree,[4] and the cottages at 256–268 London Road.[5] There are three listed churches, the Anglican churches of St Helen,[6] together with the sundial in its churchyard,[7] and Holy Trinity,[8] and the Roman Catholic Church of St Wilfrid.[9] Three swing bridges crossing the Weaver Navigation, together with their control cabins, are listed, namely the Hayhurst Bridge, the Town Bridge,[10] and the Winnington Turn Bridge.[11] Other structures associated with the Weaver Navigation are Hunt's Locks, and Navigation House with its former stables.[10] Associated with the Trent and Mersey Canal is one of its mileposts.[12] The railway viaduct built for the Cheshire Lines Committee is listed.[10] Other listed structures include the gates and gate piers of Verdin Park,[10] the original part of the Victoria Infirmary,[13] and the former Plaza Cinema.[14] In addition the statues of Ludwig Mond and Sir John Brunner, the founders of the chemical firm of Brunner Mond, standing in front of the research laboratories of Winnington Works, are listed.[15] The extraction of salt caused subsidence in the town towards the end of the 19th century, and buildings were designed so that they could be lifted in the event of further subsidence.[16] Some of these are listed, namely the Brunner Public Library,[13] the R. A. O. B. Hall,[14] and the Post Office.[13]

Key[edit]

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
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Grade Criteria[17]
Grade I Buildings of exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important.
Grade II Buildings of national importance and special interest.

Buildings[edit]

Name and location Photograph Date Notes Grade
St Helen's Church
53°15′37″N 2°30′17″W / 53.2602°N 2.5046°W / 53.2602; -2.5046 (St Helen's Church)
StHelenWitton2.jpg
14th century Additions were made in the 15th and 16th centuries. During the 19th century there was a series of restorations, the last in 1883–86 when Paley and Austin also widened the north aisle, added a vestry and created a baptistry. The church is constructed in sandstone. It has a west tower and a canted east end.[6][18][19] I
Winnington Hall
53°16′07″N 2°32′01″W / 53.2686°N 2.5336°W / 53.2686; -2.5336 (Winnington Hall)
c. 1600 This originated as a timber-framed country house. An additional stone wing was added in 1775 by Samuel Wyatt. During the 19th century it was used as a school, until in 1872 it was bought by Sir John Brunner and Ludwig Mond who each lived in a wing. After the First World War it was converted into a club for the use of the workers at the local chemical works, and has since has been made into offices.[1][20][21][22][23] I
Gates and gatepiers, Verdin Park
53°15′35″N 2°31′04″W / 53.25964°N 2.51765°W / 53.25964; -2.51765 (Gates and gatepiers, Verdin Park)
18th century The stone gate piers are rusticated with wrought iron finials. The gates are elaborate, and were moved from Bostock Hall Park. They are also in wrought iron, and consist of a pair of double gates and two single gates.[10][24] II
Sundial
53°15′36″N 2°30′17″W / 53.26001°N 2.50478°W / 53.26001; -2.50478 (Sundial, St Helen's Church)
18th century The sundial is in the churchyard of St Helen's Church to the south of the church. It is in red sandstone and consists of a vase baluster on a square plinth on two circular steps. It has a copper dial but no gnomon.[7] II
Hartford Manor
53°14′54″N 2°31′51″W / 53.2482°N 2.5308°W / 53.2482; -2.5308 (Hartford Manor)
Former Manor House, (I'm Guessing) - geograph.org.uk - 1772015.jpg
Late 18th century This stone house was refronted in about 1820. It is in two storeys with a five-bay front and a slate roof. Its central bay is slightly bowed, and contains a portico with two Doric columns and a flat entablature. The windows are sashes. It has been converted into offices.[2][25] II
16 Winnington Street
53°15′39″N 2°31′00″W / 53.2607°N 2.5167°W / 53.2607; -2.5167 (16 Winnington Street)
Late 18th century (probable) Built as a house, later used as an office. It is in brick with a slate roof, and has two storeys plus attics. The windows are sashes.[26] II
Rose Cottage
53°15′57″N 2°32′09″W / 53.2658°N 2.5357°W / 53.2658; -2.5357 (Rose Cottage)
c. 1780 A cottage built for Richard Pennant, 1st Baron Penrhyn, probably for the Winnington Estate. It is constructed in brick with a slate roof. The cottage has a single storey and an attic, and a small wing on each side of the main block. The windows are casements.[3] II
Canal milepost
53°15′59″N 2°28′26″W / 53.26648°N 2.47388°W / 53.26648; -2.47388 (Canal milepost)
Milepost beside Trent and Mersey Canal - geograph.org.uk - 641233.jpg
1819 A cast iron milepost on the west side of the Trent and Mersey Canal consisting of a circular post with a curved plate inscribed with the distances to Preston Brook and Shardlow.[12] II
256–268 London Road
53°14′57″N 2°30′39″W / 53.2491°N 2.5108°W / 53.2491; -2.5108 (256–268 London Road)
Early 19th century A row of seven cottages constructed in brick with slate roofs. They have two storeys, and have recessed sash windows. Each cottage is in a single bay, other than number 268, which is double-fronted.[5] II
The Brockhurst
53°15′03″N 2°30′29″W / 53.2508°N 2.5081°W / 53.2508; -2.5081 (The Brockhurst)
Early 19th century A stone building on a projecting plinth with a hipped slate roof. It has an Ionic porch with four columns and a flat entablature. The windows are sashes, with a pair of canted bow windows on the south side. It has been converted into flats.[14][27] II
Victoria Infirmary,
Old Wing
53°15′42″N 2°31′08″W / 53.26164°N 2.51900°W / 53.26164; -2.51900 (Victoria Infirmary, Old Wing)
Early 19th century This originated as a house, and was later converted into a hospital. It is constructed in ashlar stone, with a slate hipped roof. It is in two storeys, and has a symmetrical entrance front with a central doorway. There is a cross-wing to the right. The windows are sashes.[10][28] II
Weaver Navigation Office
53°15′28″N 2°31′02″W / 53.2579°N 2.5173°W / 53.2579; -2.5173 (Weaver Navigation Office)
1826 Later the offices of British Waterways, it is constructed in brick with hipped slate roofs, and has two storeys. The entrance doorway is flanked by Tuscan columns, above which is a fanlight. The windows are sashes.[10][29] II
Clock tower
53°15′29″N 2°31′01″W / 53.25801°N 2.51683°W / 53.25801; -2.51683 (Clock tower)
1830 The lower part of the tower is in brick, and the upper part in weatherboarded timber. There are clock faces on the north and south sides. On the top of the tower is an open domed cupola with a finial, carried on four Doric columns.[10][30] II
Cassantree
53°15′16″N 2°31′46″W / 53.2544°N 2.5294°W / 53.2544; -2.5294 (Cassantree)
1832 Located at 134 Chester Road, this is a house designed by S. W. Appleton in red brick with a pyramidal slate roof. It has a square plan plus a rear wing, and is in two storeys. The doorway is flanked by Doric three-quarter columns, above which is a fanlight. The windows are sashes, with bay windows on the side walls.[4] II
Road Milepost
53°14′50″N 2°30′37″W / 53.24732°N 2.51026°W / 53.24732; -2.51026 (Milepost, London Road)
1833 A cast iron milepost on the east side of London Road consisting of a circular post with an ogee-domed top, and a curved plate giving distances to nearby locations.[31] II
Holy Trinity Church
53°15′28″N 2°31′08″W / 53.2577°N 2.5188°W / 53.2577; -2.5188 (Holy Trinity Church)
1842 Designed by Edmund Sharpe for the Weaver Navigation Trustees, the church is constructed in sandstone with slate roofs, and is in Geometrical style. It has a slim west tower with a broach spire. It contains a 20th-century stained glass window by Trena Cox.[8][32][33][34] II
Navigation House
53°15′22″N 2°31′01″W / 53.2562°N 2.5170°W / 53.2562; -2.5170 (Navigation House)
c. 1852 Built in brick with a slate roof as a residence and office for the engineer of the Weaver Navigation, it is in two storeys with cellars. The windows are a mix of sashes, casements, French windows, and a bay window.[10][35] II
Stable block to Navigation House
53°15′22″N 2°31′02″W / 53.25624°N 2.51724°W / 53.25624; -2.51724 (Stables, Navigation House)
1856 Built for the Weaver Navigation Trust, it is constructed in brick with a slate roof. The building is in ​1 12 storeys and two bays. Its features include a large arched entrance, doorways, a circular pitching hole, a casement window, and a horizontally-sliding sash window.[10][36] II
Hunt's Locks
53°15′08″N 2°31′03″W / 53.2523°N 2.5175°W / 53.2523; -2.5175 (Hunt's Locks)
Hunt's Lock, Northwich.jpg
c. 1860 A pair of locks in the Weaver Navigation. The smaller eastern lock was built in about 1860 and has two pairs of lock gates. The western lock followed in about 1890, is wider, and has three pairs of gates. The locks also include a pair of steel semaphore signals at each end, cast iron bollards, and Pelton turbines.[10][37] II
Weaver Railway Viaduct
53°15′16″N 2°30′53″W / 53.25453°N 2.51474°W / 53.25453; -2.51474 (Weaver Railway Viaduct)
Railway Viaduct, Northwich.jpg
1862 Built for the Cheshire Lines Committee, this is a viaduct of 48 arches carrying the railway over the River Weaver, Weaver Navigation, the A533 road and the River Dane. It is constructed in sandstone and brick, with iron girders crossing the River Weaver and the Navigation. It is about 900 metres (984 yd) in length.[10][38] II
St Wilfrid's Church
53°15′44″N 2°30′24″W / 53.2621°N 2.5068°W / 53.2621; -2.5068 (St Wilfrid's Church)
1864–66 A Roman Catholic church designed by Edmund Kirby, and enlarged in 1901–02. It is constructed in red brick with blue brick dressings. Its features include a slated flèche, lancet windows, and wheel windows.[9][39] II
Weir and footbridge
53°15′15″N 2°30′58″W / 53.2543°N 2.5162°W / 53.2543; -2.5162 (Weir and footbridge)
c. 1890 A weir across the River Weaver in stone and cast iron, with a footbridge. The weir has five sluices, each separated by a stone pier. The footbridge is approached by 14 steps.[40] II
Verdin Technical Schools and Gymnasium
53°15′08″N 2°30′46″W / 53.2523°N 2.5128°W / 53.2523; -2.5128 (Verdin Technical Schools)
1896–97 The technical school was paid for by Sir Joseph Verdin, salt manufacturer, and designed by Joseph Cawley in Eclectic Renaissance style. It is built in red Ruabon brick with terracotta dressings and slate roofs. The building has a quadrangle plan with its main entrance at the east corner, and is mainly in two storeys, Its features include octagonal turrets, shaped gables, stained glass in some windows, and a polygonal roof and cupola over the main entrance.[13][41] II
Hayhurst Bridge and control cabin
53°15′30″N 2°30′59″W / 53.2582°N 2.5164°W / 53.2582; -2.5164 (Hayhurst Bridge)
Hayhurst Swing Bridge, Northwich.jpg
1899 A swing bridge carrying the A5509 road over the Weaver Navigation. It consists of a single pivoted span with asymmetrical bowstring lattice girders. There is a pair of steel gates at each end, carried on cast iron posts. The control cabin is timber-framed and weatherboarded, with casement windows, and an ornate finial on its pointed roof.[10][42] II
Town Bridge and control cabin
53°15′37″N 2°30′57″W / 53.2604°N 2.5159°W / 53.2604; -2.5159 (Town Bridge)
Northwich - Town Bridge.jpg
1899 A swing bridge carrying the A533 road over the Weaver Navigation. It consists of a single pivoted span with asymmetrical bowstring lattice girders. There is a pair of steel gates at the east end carried on cast iron posts, and a barrier on the railway track at the west end. The control cabin is timber-framed and weatherboarded, with casement windows, and ornate finials on its hipped roof.[10][43] II
Winnington Turn Bridge and control cabin
53°16′14″N 2°32′20″W / 53.2705°N 2.5389°W / 53.2705; -2.5389 (Winnington Turn Bridge)
Winnington Lane swing bridge - geograph.org.uk - 804437.jpg
1908–09 A swing bridge carrying the A533 road over the Weaver Navigation, replacing an earlier bridge of 1901. It is in cast steel, with a walkway, which was added later. The control cabin is constructed in brick and has a slate roof with a spear finial. It is in two storeys, and contains a band of casement windows.[11] II
Brunner Public Library
53°15′44″N 2°30′36″W / 53.2623°N 2.5099°W / 53.2623; -2.5099 (Brunner Public Library)
1909 A public library and museum designed by A .E. Powles. It is a timber-framed building on a brick plinth with a slate roof. It is designed to be lifted up in the event of subsidence. It is a symmetrical building in two storeys consisting of a central block with two cross wings.[13][44] II
Dock Road Pumping Station
53°15′17″N 2°30′56″W / 53.25482°N 2.51566°W / 53.25482; -2.51566 (Dock Road Pumping Station)
Dock road pumping station.jpg
1910 A circular single-storey brick building with stone dressings and a crenellated parapet. It has a round-arched quoined doorway, and seven round-arched windows with voussoirs. Inside are two pumps and two engines that were originally gas-powered.[10][45] II
R. A. O. B. Hall
53°15′43″N 2°30′39″W / 53.2620°N 2.5108°W / 53.2620; -2.5108 (R. A. O. B. Hall)
1911 Built as the Constitutional Club, and later used by the Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes, it was designed by J. Cawley as a timber-framed building with a slate roof. The building can be lifted up in the event of subsidence. It is in two storeys, the lower storey having a doorway with a pair of mullioned and transomed windows. In the upper storey is a balustraded balcony beneath a jettied gable with an ornate bressumer, bargeboards and a finial. Flanking the gallery are oriel windows.[14][46] II
Statue of Ludwig Mond
53°16′11″N 2°31′57″W / 53.26981°N 2.53243°W / 53.26981; -2.53243 (Statue of Ludwig Mond)
Statue of Ludwig Mond - geograph.org.uk - 1241818.jpg
1912 A bronze statue on a granite plinth of Ludwig Mond by Édouard Lantéri. It is life size, and includes a depiction of Mond's beard and moustache; he is wearing a hat with a floppy brim.[15][47] II
Post Office
53°15′44″N 2°30′31″W / 53.2622°N 2.5085°W / 53.2622; -2.5085 (Post Office)
1914 A timber-framed building designed to be lifted up in the event of subsidence. It has recessed plaster panels, and a tiled roof. The building is in three storeys plus an attic. Its architectural style is Elizabethan with ornate decoration. Above the entrance is an oriel window.[13][48] II
Brunner Mond and ICI Alkali Division War Memorial
53°16′08″N 2°32′02″W / 53.26881°N 2.53389°W / 53.26881; -2.53389 (Brunner Mond and ICI Alkali Division War Memorial)
1921 The war memorial, designed by Darcy Braddell, stands opposite Winnington Hall, and it was altered after the Second World War. It consists of a square and tapered obelisk in Portland stone, with a moulded stepped capstone, on which is a representation of an eternal flame in bronze and glass. The obelisk stands on a square four-stepped base, with a stone statue of a lion couchant at each corner. On the memorial is an inscription and the names of the workers from the companies who were lost in the World Wars.[49] II
Brunner Mond Lostock Gralam (Northwich) War Memorial
53°16′00″N 2°28′40″W / 53.26680°N 2.47764°W / 53.26680; -2.47764 (Brunner Mond Lostock Gralam War Memorial)
1921 The war memorial, designed by Darcy Braddell, is in Portland stone, and consists of a rectangular enclosure. There is a paved area enclosed by walls 6 feet (1.8 m) high with corner piers, and in the centre is an obelisk 10 feet (3.0 m) high. The obelisk tapers on three sides, it has a cornice, and is surmounted by a Latin cross. On the front is a wreath in bronze, and inscriptions relating to both World Wars. In the flanking walls are bronze plaques with the names of those lost in the walls.[50] II
Statue of John Brunner
53°16′11″N 2°31′57″W / 53.26971°N 2.53240°W / 53.26971; -2.53240 (Statue of John Brunner)
Northwich - John Brunner Statue.jpg
1922 A bronze statue on a granite plinth of Sir John Brunner by W. Goscombe John. It is life size, showing Brunner bearded, wearing a morning coat.[15][51] II
Plaza Cinema
53°15′45″N 2°30′26″W / 53.2626°N 2.5073°W / 53.2626; -2.5073 (Plaza Cinema)
The Plaza, Northwich (4).JPG
1928 Designed as a cinema by William and Segar Owen, it was later used as a bingo hall. It is constructed in brick on a steel frame. The front is rendered with decorative plasterwork, and is in Neoclassical style. In the centre is a portico, above which is a round-headed arch containing a sculpture of a film camera supported by putti. Inside is a double-height auditorium with a balcony at the rear.[14][52] II

References[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ a b Hartwell et al. (2011), pp. 677–679
  2. ^ a b Hartwell et al. (2011), pp. 390–391
  3. ^ a b Historic England, "Rose Cottage, Northwich (1261149)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 January 2013
  4. ^ a b Historic England, "Cassantree, Northwich (1139074)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  5. ^ a b Historic England, "256–268 London Road, Northwich (1329881)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 January 2013
  6. ^ a b Hartwell et al. (2011), pp. 512–513
  7. ^ a b Historic England, "Sundial 8 metres south of south porch of Church of St Helen, Northwich (1161074)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  8. ^ a b Hartwell et al. (2011), p. 513
  9. ^ a b Hartwell et al. (2011), pp. 513–514
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Hartwell et al. (2011), p. 515
  11. ^ a b Historic England, "Winnington Turn Bridge, Northwich (1391406)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 January 2013
  12. ^ a b Historic England, "Mile Post at NGR 685734, Northwich (1329882)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 January 2013
  13. ^ a b c d e f Hartwell et al. (2011), p. 514
  14. ^ a b c d e Hartwell et al. (2011), p. 516
  15. ^ a b c Hartwell et al. (2011), p. 677
  16. ^ Hartwell et al. (2011), p. 512
  17. ^ Listed Buildings, Historic England, retrieved 2 April 2015
  18. ^ Richards (1947), pp. 360–364
  19. ^ Historic England, "Church of St Helen, Northwich (1329880)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  20. ^ de Figueiredo & Treuherz (1988), pp. 197–203
  21. ^ Koss (170), pp. 28–29
  22. ^ Historic England, "Winnington Hall, Northwich (1310245)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  23. ^ Winnington Hall, Winnington Hall, retrieved 18 January 2013
  24. ^ Historic England, "Gates and Gatepiers to Verdin Park, Northwich (1139109)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  25. ^ Historic England, "Hartford Manor, Northwich (1139110)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  26. ^ Historic England, "16 Winnington Street, Northwich (1139115)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  27. ^ Historic England, "The Brockhurst, Northwich (1139111)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  28. ^ Historic England, "Victoria Infirmary, Old Wing, Northwich (1329883)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 January 2013
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  32. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 29, 212.
  33. ^ Hughes (2010), pp. 191–194
  34. ^ Historic England, "Church of the Holy Trinity, Northwich (1161050)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  35. ^ Historic England, "Navigation House, Northwich (1240207)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  36. ^ Historic England, "Stable Block with attached outbuildings, walls and gateway at Navigation House, Northwich (1261148)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  37. ^ Historic England, "Hunt's Locks, Northwich (1310242)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 January 2013
  38. ^ Historic England, "Weaver Railway Viaduct, Northwich (1161087)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  39. ^ Historic England, "Church of St Wilfrid (Roman Catholic), Northwich (1139073)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  40. ^ Historic England, "Weir east of Hunt's Lock, with footbridge, Northwich (1139113)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  41. ^ Historic England, "Former Verdin Technical Schools & Gymnasium, Northwich (1417201)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 24 October 2013
  42. ^ Historic England, "Hayhurst Bridge over Weaver Navigation and control cabin, Northwich (1310259)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 January 2013
  43. ^ Historic England, "Town Bridge over Weaver Navigation and control cabin, Northwich (1329879)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 January 2013
  44. ^ Historic England, "Brunner Public Library, Northwich (1161149)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  45. ^ Historic England, "Dock Road Pumping Station, Northwich (1240202)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  46. ^ Historic England, "R. A. O. B. Hall, Northwich (1329884)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 January 2013
  47. ^ Historic England, "Statue of Ludwig Mond in front of Research Lab., Winnington Works, Northwich (1139114)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  48. ^ Historic England, "Northwich Post Office (1139072)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  49. ^ Historic England, "Brunner Mond and ICI Alkali Division War Memorial (1432698)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 October 2016
  50. ^ Historic England, "Brunner Mond ostock Gralam (Northwich) War Memorial (1454837)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 11 May 2018
  51. ^ Historic England, "Statue of Sir John Brunner in front of Research Lab., Winnington Works, Northwich (1161131)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 18 January 2013
  52. ^ Historic England, "Plaza Bingo Club, Northwich (1385195)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 January 2013

Sources