Literature review

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A literature review or narrative review is a type of review article. A literature review is a scholarly paper, which includes the current knowledge including substantive findings, as well as theoretical and methodological contributions to a particular topic. Literature reviews are secondary sources, and do not report new or original experimental work. Most often associated with academic-oriented literature, such reviews are found in academic journals, and are not to be confused with book reviews that may also appear in the same publication. Literature reviews are a basis for research in nearly every academic field.[1] A narrow-scope literature review may be included as part of a peer-reviewed journal article presenting new research, serving to situate the current study within the body of the relevant literature and to provide context for the reader. In such a case, the review usually precedes the methodology and results sections of the work.

Producing a literature review may also be part of graduate and post-graduate student work, including in the preparation of a thesis, dissertation, or a journal article. Literature reviews are also common in a research proposal or prospectus (the document that is approved before a student formally begins a dissertation or thesis).[2]

Types[edit]

The main types of literature reviews are: evaluative, exploratory, and instrumental.[3]

A fourth type, the systematic review, is often classified separately, but is essentially a literature review focused on a research question, trying to identify, appraise, select and synthesize all high-quality research evidence and arguments relevant to that question. A meta-analysis is typically a systematic review using statistical methods to effectively combine the data used on all selected studies to produce a more reliable result.[4]

Process and product[edit]

Shields and Rangarajan (2013) distinguish between the process of reviewing the literature and a finished work or product known as a literature review.[5]:193–229 The process of reviewing the literature is often ongoing and informs many aspects of the empirical research project.

A careful literature review is usually 15 to 30 pages and could be longer.[citation needed] The process of reviewing the literature requires different kinds of activities and ways of thinking.[6] Shields and Rangarajan (2013) and Granello (2001) link the activities of doing a literature review with Benjamin Bloom’s revised taxonomy of the cognitive domain (ways of thinking: remembering, understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating, and creating).[5][7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hart, Chris (2018). satish Doing a Literature Review: Releasing the Research Imagination Check |url= value (help). SAGE Study Skills Series. SAGE. pp. xiii. ISBN 9781526423146. 
  2. ^ Baglione, L. (2012). Writing a Research Paper in Political Science. Thousand Oaks, California: CQ Press. 
  3. ^ Adams, John; Khan, Hafiz T A; Raeside, Robert (2007). Research methods for graduate business and social science students. New Delhi: SAGE Publications. p. 56. ISBN 9780761935896. 
  4. ^ Bolderston, Amanda (June 2008). "Writing an Effective Literature Review". Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences. 39 (2): 86–92. doi:10.1016/j.jmir.2008.04.009. 
  5. ^ a b Shields, Patricia; Rangarjan, Nandhini (2013). A Playbook for Research Methods: Integrating Conceptual Frameworks and Project Management. Stillwater, Oklahoma: New Forums Press. ISBN 1-58107-247-3. 
  6. ^ Baker, P. (2000). "Writing a Literature Review". The Marketing Review. 1 (2): 219–247. 
  7. ^ Granello, D. H. (2001). "Promoting cognitive complexity in graduate written work: Using Bloom's taxonomy as a pedagogical tool to improve Literature Reviews". Counselor Education & Supervision. 40: 292–307. 

Further reading[edit]

General[edit]

  • Cooper, Harris M. (1998). Synthesizing Research: A Guide for Literature Reviews. Applied Social Research Methods (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, California: SAGE Publications. ISBN 978-0761913481. 
  • Creswell, John W. (2013). "Review of the Literature". Research Design. Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Method Approaches (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, California: SAGE Publications. ISBN 9781452226101. 
  • Dellinger, Amy B. (2005). "Validity and the Review of Literature". Research in the Schools. 12 (2): 41–54. 
  • Dellinger, Amy B.; Leech, Nancy L. (2007). "Toward a Unified Validation Framework in Mixed Methods Research". Journal of Mixed Methods Research. 1 (4): 309–332. 
  • Galvan, José L. (2015). Writing Literature Reviews: A Guide for Students of the Social and Behavioral Sciences (6th ed.). Pyrczak Publishing. ISBN 978-1936523375. 
  • Green, Bart N.; Johnson, Claire D.; Adams, Alan (2006). "Writing Narrative Literature Reviews for Peer-Reviewed Journals: Secrets of the Trade". Journal of Chiropractic Medicine. 5 (3): 101–114. 
  • Hart, Chris (2008). "Literature Reviewing and Argumentation". In Hall, Gerard; Longman, Jo. The Postgraduate's Companion. Thousand Oaks, California: SAGE Publications. ISBN 978-1-4129-3026-0. 

Various fields[edit]

  • Hart, Chris (1998). Doing a Literature Review: Releasing the Social Science Research Imagination. SAGE Study Skills. London: SAGE Publications. ISBN 9780761959755. 
  • Hart, Chris (2001). Doing a Literature Search: A Guide for the Social Sciences. SAGE Study Skills. Thousand Oaks, California: SAGE Publications. ISBN 978-0761968108.