Marie-Louise Gay

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Marie-Louise Gay
Born 17 June 1952
Quebec City, Quebec, Canada
Occupation Illustrator, writer
Language English, French
Nationality Canadian
Genre Picture books, children's literature

Marie-Louise Gay (born 17 June 1952) is a Canadian children's writer and illustrator.[1]

From 1987 to 2015, she won the annual Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Illustrator's Award four times,[2] all for books that she also wrote.

Background[edit]

Gay was born in Quebec City and lived in Montreal and Vancouver as a child. She has received numerous awards for her written and illustrated works in both French and English, including the 2005 Vicky Metcalf Award, multiple Governor General’s Awards,[3] the Ruth Schwartz Award, the Mr. Christie's Book Award, the Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver Canadian Picture Book Award, the Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award and the Canadian Library Association Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Illustrator's Award. Gay lives in Montreal.[when?]

David Homel and Gay were husband and wife as of 2010. They had co-written two longer books, published with her black-and-white illustrations, Travels With My Family (2006) and On the Road Again! (2008), a novel.[4] At the time, she said, "For the last twenty-five years, I have mainly been writing, illustrating and creating only for children."[4]

Works[edit]

Stella and Sam[edit]

Her famous Stella and Sam books have been published in more than twelve languages.[4] They spawned a 52-episode cartoon series in 2013 that airs on Sprout and Family Junior.

Stella series[edit]

  • Stella, Star of the Sea (1999)
  • Stella, Queen of the Snow (2000)
  • Stella, Fairy of the Forest (2002)
  • Stella, Princess of the Sky (2004)
  • When Stella Was Very, Very, Small (2009)
  • Read Me A Story, Stella (2013)

Sam series[edit]

Sam is Stella's younger brother

  • Good Morning, Sam (2003)
  • Good Night, Sam (2003)
  • What Are You Doing, Sam? (2006)

Other[edit]

  • Lizzy's Lion (1984)
  • The Garden: Little Big Books (1985)
  • Moonbeam On A Cat's Ear (1986)[2]
  • Rainy Day Magic (1987)[2]
  • Angel and the Polar Bear (1988)
  • Fat Charlie's Circus (1989)
  • Willy Nilly (1990)
  • Mademoiselle Moon (1992)
  • Rabbit Blue (1993)
  • Midnight Mimi (1994)
  • Qui a peur de Loulou? (Who's afraid of Loulou?) (Montreal: VLB Editeur, 1994), 111pp, "Theatre for children"[4]
  • The Three Little Pigs (Canadian Fairy Tales Series) (1994)
  • Rumplestiltskin (1997)
  • Sur Mon Ile (1999)
  • Caramba (2006)
  • Travels With My Family (Groundwood, 2006), 128pp, by Gay and David Homel[4]
  • On the Road Again! (Groundwood, 2008), 140-page novel by Gay and David Homel[4]
  • Roslyn Rutabaga and the Biggest Hole on Earth! (2010)[2]
  • Caramba and Henry (2011)
  • Summer in the City (2012)
  • Any Questions (2014)[2]

As illustrator only[edit]

  • The Last Piece (1993)
  • When Vegetables Go Bad! (1993)
  • The Fabulous Song (1996)
  • Dreams Are More Real Than Bathtubs (1999)
  • Yuck, a Love Story (2000)
  • Didi and Daddy on the Promenade (2001)
  • Houndsley and Catina (2006)
  • Maddie series; Sophie series (1993–2003)[clarification needed]

Awards[edit]

  • Rainy Day Magic (1987) - Governor General's Award for English Language Children's Illustration[5]
  • Moonbeam On A Cat's Ear (1987) - Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Illustrator's Award[2]
  • Rainy Day Magic (1988) - Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Illustrator's Award[2]
  • Yuck, A Love Story (2000) - Governor General's Award for English Language Children's Illustration[5]
  • Stella: Queen of the Snow (2001) - Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver Award
  • Roslyn Rutabaga and the Biggest Hole on Earth! (2011) - Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Illustrator's Award[2]
  • Any Questions (2014) - Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Illustrator's Award[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Marie-Louise Gay". WorldCat. Retrieved 2 April 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Past Winners". Amelia Frances Howard-Gibbon Illustrator's Award. Canadian Library Association (cla.ca). Retrieved 30 July 2015. With general information about the same award and the book awards program.
  3. ^ "Winners of two or more Governor General's Literary Awards" (PDF). Canada Council for the Arts (canadacouncil.ca). Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 May 2011. Retrieved 2 April 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f "Marie-Louise Gay". CANSCAIP Members. Canadian Society of Children's Authors, Illustrators and Performers (canscaip.org). Archived from the original on 2010-04-10. Retrieved 30 July 2015. 
  5. ^ a b "Cumulative List of Winners of The Governor General's Literary Awards" (PDF). Canada Council. Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 May 2011. Retrieved 2 April 2010. 

External links[edit]