Mememolly

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Mememolly
Molly Templeton at the Streamy Awards 2010.jpg
Molly Templeton at the Streamy Awards 2010
Born (1989-10-25) 25 October 1989 (age 32)
Beaconsfield, England
NationalityBritish-Canadian
Years active2006–present
Known forVlogging, Rocketboom
Spouse(s)
Mike Rugnetta
(m. 2017)
YouTube information
Channel
GenreVlogs
Subscribers100 thousand[1]
Total views48.4 million[1]
YouTube Silver Play Button 2.svg 100,000 subscribers

Updated: 18 June 2021

Molly Templeton (born 25 October 1989), known by her stage name Mememolly (me-me-molly) is a British-Canadian Internet personality and entrepreneur. She hosted the video blog Rocketboom from July 2009 to July 2011.[2][3]

Career[edit]

Originally from the United Kingdom, Templeton started making YouTube videos in her bedroom when she was 16.[citation needed] After a few years working independently in web video and studying fine art at Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver, she went to New York to host, write and produce for the comedic news web show, Rocketboom.[4][5] In July 2011 she left Rocketboom and was employed by the online entertainment studio My Damn Channel as Director of Talent & Audience Development, later cofounding the internet marketing agency Everybody at Once.[4][6][7] Since October 2019, Templeton has worked for YouTube as the Head of Social Marketing, Operations, & Global Crisis Response.[7]

Templeton's mememolly channel on YouTube was once No. 10 on the all-time most-subscribed list for the UK.[2] As of December 2020, the channel has over hundred thousand subscribers and 48 million video views, and has been inactive since 2013.[2][8]

Personal life[edit]

Templeton was born and raised in Beaconsfield, England.[2] Since July 2017, she is married to American composer and educational YouTuber Mike Rugnetta.[9] As of 2019, the couple live in an apartment in Brooklyn, New York.[4][10] She has collaborated with him several times on his podcasts, as an interviewee on Reasonably Sound and as a performer on Fun City.[11][12][13]

Templeton is an avid cyclist, and has misophonia (an extreme aversion to, but not a fear of, certain sounds).[14][15]

Although ceasing to make YouTube videos in 2013 and largely dropping out of the public eye, Templeton maintains a following on other social media platforms, including Twitter and Instagram.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "About mememolly". YouTube.
  2. ^ a b c d Marc Hustvedt (6 July 2009). "'Rocketboom' Premieres New NYC Host 'mememolly'". Tubefilter. Retrieved 29 November 2009.
  3. ^ Lazar, Shira (10 November 2009). "The Va Va Voom Behind RocketBoom". CBS News. Archived from the original on 13 November 2009. Retrieved 29 November 2009.
  4. ^ a b c "My Damn Channel Talent Network Will Sign, Develop, Produce New Video Stars". Marketing Weekly News. 20 August 2011. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 9 September 2014 – via HighBeam Research.
  5. ^ Hustvedt, Marc (26 June 2009). "YouTube Star 'mememolly' To Be Next 'Rocketboom' Host". Tubefilter. Retrieved 9 September 2014.
  6. ^ Cohen, Joshua (1 August 2011). "My Damn Channel Launches Talent Division, Hires Mememolly". Tubefilter. Retrieved 9 September 2014.
  7. ^ a b Templeton, Molly (29 December 2020). "Molly Templeton". LinkedIn.
  8. ^ "mememolly YouTube Channel Stats, Subscriber Statistics, Ranking". vidstatsx.com. Archived from the original on 26 February 2013. Retrieved 9 September 2014.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  9. ^ "We are now legally required to hang out together forever". Instagram. 15 July 2017. Retrieved 5 November 2017.
  10. ^ "Mememolly & Mike's Flea Market-Style Funhouse in Brooklyn". Apartment Therapy. Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  11. ^ "Reasonably Sound". Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  12. ^ "Podcasts – Mike Rugnetta". Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  13. ^ "Fun City". Stitcher. Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  14. ^ "Mike & Molly". meaningfull.media. 2 November 2016. Retrieved 29 December 2020.
  15. ^ Staff, Ars (16 November 2019). "The science of audio: How a podcast reveals the pleasant mysteries of hearing". Ars Technica. Retrieved 29 December 2020.

External links[edit]