Michael Clinton

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Michael Clinton
Born
Education
Occupation
  • Publisher
  • writer
  • photographer
Employers
Board member ofInternational Center of Photography

Michael A. Clinton is an American writer, photographer and former magazine publishing executive. He was publisher of GQ magazine from 1988 to 1994 and subsequently senior vice president and executive vice president of publisher Condé Nast until 1997. He joined Hearst Magazines as senior vice president and chief marketing officer and soon after added the publishing director title at Hearst. From 2010, he was the president, marketing and publishing director of Hearst Magazines and also served on the board of directors of The Hearst Corporation. After retiring in 2020, he remains as senior media advisor to the CEO of Hearst.

A graduate of the University of Pittsburgh and Pace University's Lubin School of Business, Clinton began his career as a reporter for DNR, a men's wear trade journal. He has composed 8 books of photography, 2 collections of essays, and his latest book, ROAR: Into the Second Half of Your Life (Before It's Too Late), published in September 2021.

Early life and education[edit]

Clinton was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,[1] to Joe Clinton Sr. and Nancy Clinton, the oldest of 6 siblings.[citation needed] He graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor's degree in economics and political science from the University of Pittsburgh.[2] In 1983, Clinton earned an MBA from Pace University's Lubin School of Business.[3] He also received a degree of Doctor of Humane Letters from Pace University in May 2013[4] and also serves on the board of trustees of the university.[5]

Clinton also earned an M.S. in nonprofit management from Columbia University in 2021.[6][7]

Magazine career[edit]

In 1978, Clinton began his career as a reporter for DNR, a men's wear trade journal published by Fairchild Publications. He later moved over to the business side of publishing.[6][8] In the mid 1980s, he joined Condé Nast, which publishes GQ magazine.[9][10] He was ad director at GQ until late 1988, when he became publisher of the magazine.[11] He led GQ magazine until late 1994, when he became senior vice president at Condé Nast,[12] and later executive vice president.[10]

Clinton left Condé Nast, in August 1997, to join the competitor Hearst Magazines, in October 1997, as senior vice president and chief marketing officer.[13] The following year, he became group publisher of five magazines, including Esquire and House Beautiful.[14] In 2001, he was appointed as publishing director at Hearst and, in June 2010, was named president, marketing and publishing director of Hearst Magazines.[2] During his tenure, he helped start several magazine labels, including O, The Oprah Magazine, Food Network Magazine, HGTV Magazine and The Pioneer Woman Magazine.[15] He also helped acquire Hachette Filipacchi Media, publisher of Elle,[16] as well as Rodale, publisher of Men's Health and Runner's World. In July 2019, Clinton retired as president, marketing and publishing director of Hearst. He continues to serve as a senior media advisor to the Hearst CEO and president Steve Swartz.[14] In addition, Clinton has written for publications including Afar,[17] The New York Times,[18] and Town & Country.[19]

Photography and books[edit]

In 2004, he published Wanderlust: A Personal Journey,[20] a book of essays and photographs he took while traveling in more than 100 countries. He then published a series of three books, Global Snaps (2005), Global Faces (2007),[21] and Global Remains (2011),[22] along with American Portraits (2010), which focuses on 100 American subjects from as many countries.[23]

Clinton is a trustee of the International Center of Photography in New York.[24][25] He has also exhibited his work in galleries, including a 2013 solo exhibition, Wanderlust, at the Tulla Booth Gallery in Sag Harbor, New York.[26]

His 2013 book, Globetrotter Diaries: Tales, Tips and Tactics for Traveling the 7 Continents, includes a collection of essays with advice to travelers compiled from his own experience and contributions from his colleagues, magazine editors and publishers Pamela Fiori, Nancy Novogood, and Kate White.[27][28]

In 2015, Clinton released his seventh book, Closer: Seeing the World in Details, containing detailed close-up stills from about 30 countries he has visited.[24][29] In 2016, Clinton's The Hamptons includes photographs and descriptions of scenes on The Hamptons, from Shinnecock Hills to Montauk.[30] His 2018 book, Santa Fe, documents the eponymous city in New Mexico.[31] In Tales From the Trails: Runners' Stories That Inspire and Transform (2019), Clinton features several stories of how running has benefited people's lives.[32]

In September 2021, Clinton released his eleventh book, ROAR: Into the Second Half of Your Life (Before It's Too Late), published by Atria Books/Beyond Words.[33][34][35] The book draws its title from an acronym for a mantra by Clinton: "Reimagine yourself, Own who you are, Act on what's next for you, Reassess your relationships".[36] The book describes how people may transform themselves later in life[37] and pursue a new career trajectory by "rewiring or 'refiring' for what could be another 30 or 40 years of life".[38] Clinton had completed a survey of people in the workforce and interviewed 40 people who had transitioned into a different career later in life. Amy Lindren writes for the Pioneer Press that, "In a refreshing twist, Clinton moves beyond the quit-your-job model of renewal with his concept of 'life-layering'—adding something to your life to help balance the job that you may not be able to quit at the moment."[37]

Personal life[edit]

Clinton is a private pilot[24][29] and learned to fly in the late 1990s.[39] He is also an avid traveler[40][41] who has visited more than 123 countries.[42] As a former board member and supporter of Starlight Children's Foundation, he has raised money for the foundation by leading expeditions to Nepal, Patagonia, and to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro. He lives in Manhattan, New York,[25] and Santa Fe, New Mexico.[43]

Clinton also enjoys running and has run races in more than 60 countries, completing marathons in each of the seven continents.[18] He ran his first marathon as a unregistered "bandit" at the 1978 New York City Marathon.[44] He has run marathons in London, Buenos Aires, the Australian Gold Coast, Mount Kilimanjaro, and Philadelphia.[42][45] In August 2013, Clinton completed the Mongolia Sunrise to Sunset Marathon.[42] He ran a marathon on Antarctica in March 2014, becoming one of 440 runners to complete a marathon in every continent as of 2014.[42][45]

He is also the founder of Circle of Generosity, a foundation that grants random acts of kindness to people in need.[24][46]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Wanderlust: A Personal Journey (2004). Glitterati. ISBN 978-1-5768722-5-3.
  • Global Snaps: 500 Photographs from 7 Continents (2005). Glitterati. ISBN 978-0-976585-11-4.
  • Global Faces: 500 Photographs from 7 Continents (2007). Glitterati. ISBN 978-0-977753-10-9.
  • American Portraits: 100 Countries (2010). Glitterati. ISBN 978-0-9822669-1-5.
  • Global Remains: Abandoned Architecture and Objects from Seven Continents (2011). Glitterati. ISBN 978-0-9823799-5-0.
  • Globetrotter Diaries: Tales, Tips and Tactics for Traveling the 7 Continents (2013). Glitterati ISBN 978-0-9851696-6-4.
  • Closer: Seeing the World in Details (2015). Glitterati. ISBN 978-0-9905320-2-6.
  • The Hamptons (2016). Glitterati. ISBN 978-1-943876-09-9.
  • Santa Fe (2018). Glitterati. ISBN 978-1-943876-55-6.
  • Tales from the Trails: Running for Life (2019). Glitterati. ISBN 978-1-943876-61-7.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hagey, Keach (January 30, 2013). "Magazine Exec's Bag". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "Michael A. Clinton" (PDF). Hearst.com. Retrieved June 9, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  3. ^ Lopes, Tiffany (May 8, 2013). "Celebrating Seniors". The Pulse. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. ^ "Previous Honorary Degree Recipients" (PDF). Pace University. 2015. p. 9. Retrieved June 9, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. ^ "Board Additions". Pace Magazine. Pace University. April 20, 2020. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  6. ^ a b Fuller, Melynda (May 14, 2019). "Hearst's Michael Clinton To Retire, Leaves Post As President, Marketing". MediaPost. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  7. ^ "Former Hearst President and M.S. Nonprofit Management Alum Michael Clinton to Publish 'Roar Into the Second Half of Your Life'". Columbia University School of Professional Studies. June 17, 2021. Retrieved June 22, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  8. ^ Hays, Kali (May 14, 2019). "Hearst's Michael Clinton on Retirement, 'Failing Fast' and the Future". WWD. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. ^ Kelly, Keith J. (August 25, 1997). "Conde Nast magazine exec calls it quits". Daily News. p. 22. Retrieved June 10, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  10. ^ a b Elliott, Stuart (August 26, 1997). "Michael Clinton Leaving Conde Nast". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  11. ^ Lazarus, George (September 16, 1988). "Ad Rounds: Kraft-y doings". Daily News. p. 41. Retrieved June 10, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  12. ^ Macintosh, Jeane (October 28, 1994). "The Men's Wars: Are the Niche Players Chipping into the Old Guard?". WWD. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  13. ^ Lazarus, George (October 7, 1997). "On Marketing". Business. Chicago Tribune. p. 3-3. Retrieved June 10, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  14. ^ a b Barber, Kayleaigh (May 14, 2019). "Hearst's Michael Clinton to Retire After 21 Years". Folio. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  15. ^ Hays, Kali (May 14, 2019). "Hearst's Michael Clinton Pulling Back After 21 Years". WWD. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  16. ^ Wicks, Amy (December 14, 2011). "Michael Clinton, Hearst's Billion-Dollar Man". WWD. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  17. ^ Clinton, Michael (November 10, 2016). "As a Traveler, How Do You Walk Sarajevo's Bridge to the Past?". Afar. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  18. ^ a b Clinton, Michael (October 2, 2019). "Seeing the World, 26.2 Miles at a Time". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  19. ^ Clinton, Michael (Fall 2004). "Wanderlust". Town & Country Travel. Vol. 2, no. 3. pp. 138–139, 150–151.
  20. ^ Maslin, Janet (December 10, 2004). "Temptations of the Bookshelf". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  21. ^ Cloud, Barbara (December 3, 2007). "City native's book puts face on world". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  22. ^ "On Our Reading List: Global Remains". Harper's Bazaar. November 3, 2011. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  23. ^ O'Driscoll, Bill (August 30, 2010). "Michael Clinton's American Portraits". Pittsburgh City Paper. Blogh. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  24. ^ a b c d Shaw, Dan (May 8, 2015). "At Home With Michael A. Clinton of Hearst Magazines". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  25. ^ a b Case, Tony (August 30, 2015). "What Your Home Looks Like When You've Traveled to Most of the Countries on Earth". Adweek. Archived from the original on December 8, 2018. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  26. ^ Hinkle, Annette (June 26, 2013). "Michael Clinton's Tales of a Globetrotter". The Sag Harbor Express. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  27. ^ Bloomgarden-Smoke, Kara (February 20, 2013). "Get Outta Town! Hearst Heavyweight Michael Clinton Likes To Travel". Observer. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  28. ^ Brooke Porter, Katz (February 14, 2013). "Q+A: The Globetrotter Diaries' Michael Clinton". Travel + Leisure. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  29. ^ a b Heinzinger, Kristen (July 27, 2015). "A Moment With…Michael Clinton". Daily Front Row. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  30. ^ Winkler, Jon (June 30, 2016). "Michael Clinton Photographs Different Side Of The Hamptons". The Southampton Press. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  31. ^ Baker, Ashley (February 14, 2019). "Michael Clinton on the Hearst Administration and its strategy to success". Daily Front Row. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  32. ^ Moore, David Leon (September 27, 2019). "In their own words, how runners, and maybe even 'Brittany,' found inspiration". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on May 28, 2020. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  33. ^ Roar. September 7, 2021. ISBN 9781582708133.
  34. ^ Haber, Leigh (September 1, 2021). "Michael Clinton's New Book, ROAR, Teaches Us How To Seize the Day". Oprah Daily. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  35. ^ Taylor, Chris (August 18, 2021). "Second-half surge: How to maximize life's later chapters". Reuters. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  36. ^ Sebastian, Michael (September 7, 2021). "Are you Reconsidering ... Everything? There's a New Book To Help With That". Esquire. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  37. ^ a b Amy, Lindgren (July 17, 2021). "Working Strategies: Summer reading for job seekers". Twin Cities. Retrieved October 12, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  38. ^ Vitu, Teya (September 7, 2021). "Former Hearst Magazines boss writes about the second half of life". Santa Fe New Mexican. Retrieved October 12, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  39. ^ Scott, Phil (September 1, 2017). "Magazine Executive: Michael Clinton". AOPA. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  40. ^ Chesnut, Mark (January 31, 2013). "Q&A: Hearst Magazine's Michael Clinton Shares Latin America Travel Tips". LatinFlyer.com. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  41. ^ Clehane, Diane (June 7, 2017). "A Hearst Executive's 'Other' Career, the Most Real Housewife of NYC and a Wall Street Trump Prediction". Adweek. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  42. ^ a b c d Gray, Kevin (August 25, 2014). "Running Across the World: Adventure Marathoner Michael Clinton". Men's Journal. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  43. ^ Clinton, Michael (January 10, 2017). "Beyond Santa Fe, a Different World". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  44. ^ Clinton, Michael (September 28, 2019). "Why I Will Always Want to Be Known as a Runner". Runner's World. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  45. ^ a b Sebastian, Michael (March 25, 2014). "Meet Hearst's Global Marathon Man". AdAge. Retrieved June 10, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  46. ^ Membis, Liane (June 18, 2012). "Generosity That Comes Full Circle". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved June 10, 2020.