Minhaj-ul-Quran

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Minhaj-ul-Quran International
Founded 1980
Founder Muhammad Tahir ul-Qadri
Type NGO
Focus Sufism and spiritual development, human rights, women's rights, tackling extremism, promoting peace, interfaith dialogue and religious moderation
Location
Method Education, Training
Website Minhaj.org

Minhaj-ul-Quran International (منہاج القرآن انٹرنیشنل) (or MQI) is an international non-governmental organization (NGO) founded by Muhammad Tahir-ul-Qadri in 1980 in Lahore, Pakistan.

International network[edit]

Minhaj-ul-Quran India's Logo
Minhaj-ul-Quran International Headquarters, Pakistan

Minhaj-ul-Quran Norway[edit]

Minhaj-ul-Quran Norway is the Norwegian branch of the Minhaj-ul-Quran International organisation based in Oslo. MQI established its centre in Norway and Denmark early in 1984. MQI has various community related projects which are supported by the Norwegian Government.[1]

One of the main projects is the Minhaj conflict resolution or Minhaj Konfliktråd (MKR).[2]


Minhaj-ul-Quran India[edit]

Achievements[edit]

Minhaj-ul-Quran holds one of the largest annual Itikaf gatherings during the month of Ramadan with approximately 37,000 people sitting congregational Itikaf in 2007. It holds the largest Laylat ul Qadr night event on the 27th Ramadan with millions of attendees.[3][4]

On 3 December 2005 Minhaj-ul-Quran established a full-time institution called Gosha-e-Durood where any individual can apply to sit for reciting salutations on Muhammad. In the last two years trillions of salutations have been recited. A building dedicated to this purpose with Mawlana Rumi style minarets is under construction.[5]

Minhaj-ul-Quran International is the first organisation of its kind that has initiated interfaith dialogues with religious minorities in Pakistan. Its founder is the Chairman of the 'Muslim Christian Dialogue Forum' to highlight and promote their citizen rights.[6][7][8]

The United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) has formally recognised and granted a 'Special Consultative Status' to Minhaj-ul-Quran International due to its services in promoting peace, tolerance, interfaith harmony and education, tackling extremism and terrorism, engaging with young Muslims for religious moderation, promoting women’s rights, and providing social welfare and promotion of human rights.[9]

In September 2011, Minhaj-ul-Quran organised a major "Peace for Humanity" conference at Wembley Arena in London at which, under the auspices of Tahir-ul-Qadri, its 12,000 attendees announced a global declaration denouncing racism, interfaith intolerance, extremism and terrorism.[10] Minhaj-ul-Quran strategist Joel Hayward[11] wrote the declaration text for Qadri[12] and was its second formal signatory after Qadri himself. Notably, senior Al-Azhar University leaders and dignitaries then signed it before Minhaj-ul-Quran opened it up via the internet for public signing.[13] They aim to get one million signatures within a year.[10] The London Declaration for Global Peace and Resistance against Extremism is intended as an interfaith document which unequivocally condemns all extremism and terrorism, ”because at the heart of all religions is a belief in the sanctity of the lives of the innocent.”[14] The Declaration adds: “The indiscriminate nature of terrorism, which has in recent years killed far more civilians and other non-combatants than it has combatants, is un-Islamic, un-Judaic, un-Christian and it is indeed incompatible with the true teachings of all faiths.”[14] The London Declaration also “unequivocally condemn[s] anti-Semitism (including when sometimes it is disingenuously clothed as anti-Zionism), Islamophobia (including when it is sometimes disingenuously dressed up as patriotism) and all other forms of racism and xenophobia.”[14] Some extremists have already tried to prevent the success of the Declaration via cyber-attacks on the website hosting it.[15]

Tahir-ul Qadri announced the largest March in modern times in Pakistan; a march to take place on 14th Jan 2013 at 'Tahrir Square' Islamabad. The agenda of long march is to voice elimination of feudalism, introduction of real democracy, rule of law and implementation of constitution.[16]

Forums and sub-organisations[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]