Minister for Culture, Communications and Creative Industries

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In the Government of the United Kingdom, the Minister for the Arts is a ministerial post, usually a low to middle-ranking minister to the much senior Secretary of State, who runs the entire department and is ultimately responsible for the department's brief.

The post has been in a variety of ministries, but after 1997 it has been a Minister of State position in the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. From 1992 to 1997, the post was combined with the office of Secretary of State for National Heritage. The title of the post was changed to Minister for Culture in 2005, and to Minister for Culture, Creative Industries and Tourism in 2007. Under that last title, the office was held by Barbara Follett MP, who was appointed on 5 October 2008, until 22 September 2009.

Ed Vaizey was appointed by then Prime Minister David Cameron to the position as Minister for Culture, Communications and Creative Industries at Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State level, a post Vaizey initially split between the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS), but is now entirely placed in the DCMS.[1]

The Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Arts, Heritage and Tourism was created in 2017. The minister works in the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Digital Infrastructure was created in 2019.

Current portfolio[edit]

Ministers for the Arts[edit]

The individuals who have held the office of Minister for the Arts or equivalent existing positions, their terms and under which Prime Minister.

Name Term Start Term End Title Prime Minister
Jennie Lee 1964 1967 Minister of State for the Arts Harold Wilson
1967 1970 Parliamentary Under-Secretary for the Arts
The Viscount Eccles 20 June 1970 5 June 1973 Minister of State for the Arts Edward Heath
Norman St John-Stevas 2 December 1973 4 March 1974
Hugh Jenkins 4 March 1974 5 April 1976 Harold Wilson
The Lord Donaldson of Kingsbridge 5 April 1976 4 May 1979 James Callaghan
Norman St John-Stevas 5 May 1979 5 January 1981 Margaret Thatcher
Paul Channon 5 January 1981 11 June 1983
The Earl of Gowrie 11 June 1983 2 September 1985
Richard Luce 3 September 1985 25 July 1990
David Mellor 26 July 1990 28 November 1990
Tim Renton 28 November 1990 11 April 1992 John Major
David Mellor 11 April 1992 22 September 1992 Secretary of State for National Heritage
Peter Brooke CH 22 September 1992 20 July 1994
Stephen Dorrell 20 July 1994 5 July 1995
Virginia Bottomley 5 July 1995 2 May 1997
Mark Fisher 2 May 1997 14 June 1998 Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the Arts Tony Blair
Alan Howarth 28 July 1998 7 June 2001
The Baroness Blackstone 8 June 2001 13 June 2003 Minister of State for the Arts
Estelle Morris 13 June 2003 5 May 2005
David Lammy 5 May 2005 28 June 2007 Minister of State for Culture
Margaret Hodge 28 June 2007 3 October 2008 Minister of State for Culture and Tourism Gordon Brown
Barbara Follett 4 October 2008 22 September 2009
Margaret Hodge 22 September 2009 11 May 2010
Ed Vaizey 14 May 2010 15 July 2014 Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Culture, Communications and Creative Industries David Cameron
15 July 2014 15 July 2016 Minister of State for Culture and the Digital Economy
Matt Hancock 15 July 2016 8 January 2018 Minister of State for Digital and Culture Theresa May
Margot James 9 January 2018 18 July 2019 Minister of State for Digital and Creative Industries
Nigel Adams 24 July 2019 13 February 2020 Minister of State for Sport, Media and Creative Industries Boris Johnson
Caroline Dinenage 13 February 2020 Present Minister of State for Digital and Culture

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mr Edward Vaizey". parliament.uk. House of Commons. Retrieved 15 March 2014.

External links[edit]