Moira Walley-Beckett

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Moira Walley-Beckett
Born Canada
Occupation Television, film writer
Nationality Canadian
Genre Screenwriting
Notable works Breaking Bad

Moira Walley-Beckett is a Canadian-born, American-based television actress, producer and writer. She has worked on the AMC drama Breaking Bad as a writer and producer and has won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series as well as being nominated for a Writers Guild of America (WGA) Award for her work on the series. She is the creator of television series Flesh and Bone.

Early life[edit]

Walley-Beckett was raised in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, and attended the Banff School of Fine Arts.[1] In 1982, she joined the Arts Club Theatre Company.[2]

Career[edit]

Walley-Beckett worked throughout the 1980s and 1990s as a television actress. She had guest starring roles on many different series.

Walley-Beckett began writing for television in 2007 as a staff writer for a short-lived NBC detective drama Raines, starring Jeff Goldblum. In 2008 she joined the writing staff for the legal drama Eli Stone and penned the episode "Heal the Pain".

She joined the crew of Breaking Bad as a story editor for the second season and wrote the episodes "Breakage"[3] and "Over".[4] The second season writing staff were nominated for the Writers Guild of America (WGA) Award for best drama series at the February 2010 ceremony for their work on the second season.[5] She was promoted to co-producer for the third season in 2010 and wrote the episodes "Mas"[6] and (with Sam Catlin) "Fly." She was promoted again to producer for the fourth season in 2011. For the fifth season, Walley-Beckett wrote "Gliding Over All" and "Ozymandias"; the latter received universal praise from critics, and has since been called one of the greatest episodes of television ever broadcast. On August 25, 2014 she won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series for "Ozymandias", becoming the first solo woman to win the award in the Drama category since Ann Biderman won in 1994.[7]

Filmography[edit]

Production staff

Year Show Role Notes
2015 Flesh and Bone Creator Season 1
2011–12 Pan Am Producer Season 1
2013 Breaking Bad Producer Season 5
2012
2011 Season 4
2010 Co-producer Season 3
2009 Story editor Season 2

Writer

Year Show Season Episode title Episode Notes
2017 Anne 1
2012 Pan Am 1 "Romance Languages" 13
2011 "Kiss Kiss Bang Bang" 9 co-wrote with Lydia Woodward
"Eastern Exposure" 4 co-wrote with Jack Orman
2013 Breaking Bad 5 "Ozymandias" 14
2012 "Gliding Over All" 8
2011 4 "End Times" 12 co-wrote with Thomas Schnauz
"Bug" 9
"Bullet Points" 4
2010 3 "Fly" 10 co-wrote with Sam Catlin
"Mas"[6] 5
2009 2 "Over"[4] 10
"Breakage"[3] 5
2008 Eli Stone 1 "Heal the Pain" 7 co-wrote with Alex Taub

References[edit]

  1. ^ Patch, Nick (July 13, 2014). "Vancouver-raised 'Breaking Bad' scribe celebrates Emmy nod for beloved episode". The Vancouver Sun. Retrieved August 24, 2014. 
  2. ^ Leiren-Young, Mark (March 11, 2014). "ARTS CLUB ANNIVERSARY ESSAY: "THE ARTS CLUB ON SCREEN"" (PDF). Arts Club. 
  3. ^ a b Johan Renck (director); Moira Walley-Becket (writer) (2009-04-05). "Breakage". Breaking Bad. Season 2. Episode 5. AMC. 
  4. ^ a b Phil Abraham (director); Moira Walley-Becket (writer) (2009-05-10). "Over". Breaking Bad. Season 2. Episode 10. AMC. 
  5. ^ "2009 Writers Guild Awards Television, Radio, News, Promotional Writing, and Graphic Animation Nominees Announced". WGA. 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-12. 
  6. ^ a b Johan Renck (director); Moira Walley-Becket (writer) (2010-04-18). "Mas". Breaking Bad. Season 3. Episode 5. AMC. 
  7. ^ Alter, Charlotte (August 26, 2014). "Vince Gilligan Thought True Detective Would Win the Emmy for Best Drama". Time. Retrieved August 26, 2014. 

External links[edit]