Museum of Photographic Arts

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Museum of Photographic Arts
Museum of Photographic Arts.jpg
Museum of Photographic Arts, Balboa Park, San Diego
Museum of Photographic Arts is located in San Diego
Museum of Photographic Arts
Location within San Diego
Museum of Photographic Arts is located in California
Museum of Photographic Arts
Location within San Diego
Museum of Photographic Arts is located in the US
Museum of Photographic Arts
Location within San Diego
Location San Diego, California, US
Coordinates 32°43′52″N 117°08′56″W / 32.731°N 117.149°W / 32.731; -117.149Coordinates: 32°43′52″N 117°08′56″W / 32.731°N 117.149°W / 32.731; -117.149

The Museum of Photographic Arts (MOPA) is a museum in San Diego's Balboa Park. First founded in 1974, MOPA opened in 1983.[1][2] MOPA is one of three museums in the US dedicated exclusively to the collection and preservation of photography, with a mission to inspire, educate and engage the broadest possible audience through the presentation, collection, and preservation of photography, film and video.[3] The museum's address is 1649 El Prado, San Diego, CA, 92101.

History[edit]

Arthur Ollman was the museum's first executive director. Deborah Klochko is the current (2013) executive director. In March 2000, the museum re-opened to the public after a twelve-month renovation project.[2] It expanded its gallery space and added a classroom, a theater, a print viewing room and a 20,000-volume library.[3]

Collection[edit]

Over the years, MOPA has collected thousands of photographs that currently reside in the museum’s permanent collection, which includes photographs that span the history of photography.[4] It includes collections from film maker Lou Stoumen’s estate as well as the entire Nagasaki Journey: The Photographs of Yosuke Yamahata, August 10, 1945, by Yōsuke Yamahata.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Showley, Roger M. (1999). Balboa Park: A Millennium History. Heritage Media Corp. p. 183. ISBN 1-886483-40-X. Founded: 1972 ... Size: 32,000 square feet ... Originally operated as the Center for Photographic Arts, a museum without walls, the Museum of Photographic Arts moved into 7,500 square feet in the Casa de Balboa in 1983 ... When the Hall of Champions relocated in 1999, MOPA remodeled the space for more galleries, a classroom, auditorium, print-viewing room, library and other facilities. The expansion allowed the museum to develop and screen a collection of motion pictures and videos. 
  2. ^ a b MOPA: museum history
  3. ^ a b MOPA: info
  4. ^ MOPA permanent collection

Further reading[edit]

  • Showley, Roger M. (1999). Balboa Park: A Millennium History. Heritage Media Corp. p. 155. ISBN 1-886483-40-X. [After the February 22, 1978 fire,] The Electric Building's ruins were cleared away and the $8 million Casa de Balboa, a replica of the 1915 Commerce and Industries Building, replaced it in 1982 ... Also new [in the Casa de Balboa] was the Museum of Photographic Arts. 

External links[edit]