Nebula (company)

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Nebula Inc
Private
IndustryCloud Computing
FoundedMenlo Park, California, United States (March 25, 2011 (2011-03-25))
FounderChris C. Kemp, Devin Carlen, Steve O'Hara
Defunct(April 1, 2015 (2015-04-01))
Headquarters,
U.S.
WebsiteNebula.com

Nebula, Inc. was a hardware and software company with offices in Mountain View, California, and Seattle, Washington, USA. Nebula developed Nebula One, a cloud computing hardware appliance that turned racks of standard servers into a private cloud. The Nebula One private cloud system was built on the OpenStack open source cloud framework, as well as many other open source software projects.

History[edit]

Nebula was founded as '“Fourth Paradigm Development" in March 2011 by former NASA Ames Research Center chief technology officer Chris C. Kemp, long-time colleague Devin Carlen, entrepreneur Steve O'Hara, with software engineer Tres Henry, formerly at Amazon Web Services and author of the AWS Console, named as the head of User Experience.[1]

In May 2011, Nebula closed a round of series A investment led by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers and Highland Capital Partners, with participation from Google's first three investors—Andy Bechtolsheim, Ram Shriram, and David Cheriton, as well as other investors.[2]

In the summer of 2012, eight members of the original Anso Labs (acquired by Rackspace) and NASA team that originally wrote components of the OpenStack project joined Nebula.[3]

In the fall of 2012, Nebula closed a $25 million series B investment led by Comcast Ventures and Highland Capital, and Google executive Eric Schmidt’s venture fund Innovation Endeavors became an investor.[4]

In February 2013, Silicon India named Kemp as one of ten pioneers in cloud computing.[5] In March 2013, Nebula was named one of CIO.com 10 Hot Cloud Companies to Watch.[6] Nebula One, was made generally available on April 2, 2013.[7]

On April 1, 2015 the company announced on its website and confirmed on Twitter that it was ceasing operations.[8][9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Weinberger, Matthew. "Nebula: Who We Are and How We Came to Be". Archived from the original on 11 April 2013. Retrieved 12 March 2013.
  2. ^ Morgan, Timothy Prickett (July 27, 2011). "NASA's former CTO launches Nebula cloud controller". The Register. Retrieved September 17, 2016.
  3. ^ Darrow, Barb (23 July 2012). "OpenStack developers leave Rackspace for Nebula". GigaOM. Retrieved 12 March 2013.
  4. ^ Rao, Leena (4 September 2012). "Nebula Raises $25M From Comcast, Kleiner Perkins To Help Companies Deploy On-Premises, Private Clouds". TechCrunch. Retrieved 12 March 2013.
  5. ^ "10 Pioneers Of Cloud Computing". Silicon India. February 17, 2013. Retrieved September 18, 2016.
  6. ^ Vance, Jeff (4 March 2013). "10 Hot Cloud Startups to Watch". Retrieved 12 March 2013.
  7. ^ Williams, Alex (2 April 2013). "Nearly Two Years Later, Nebula Launches A Mainframe Style "Cloud Computer" Built On OpenStack". TechCrunch. Retrieved 2 April 2013.
  8. ^ Ben Kepes (April 1, 2015). "OpenStack Carnage--Nebula Shuts Down". Forbes. Retrieved September 17, 2016.
  9. ^ "OpenStack hardware startup Nebula shuts down". Venture Beat. April 1, 2015. Retrieved September 4, 2016.

External links[edit]