New Denver

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New Denver
The Corporation of the Village of New Denver[1]
New Denver is located in British Columbia
New Denver
New Denver
Location of New Denver in British Columbia
Coordinates: 49°59′29″N 117°22′19″W / 49.99139°N 117.37194°W / 49.99139; -117.37194
Country Canada
Province British Columbia
RegionSlocan Valley, West Kootenay
Regional districtCentral Kootenay
Founded1892
Incorporated1929
Government
 • Governing bodyNew Denver Village Council
 • MayorLeonard Casley
Area
 • Total0.87 km2 (0.34 sq mi)
Elevation
560 m (1,840 ft)
Population
 (2016)
 • Total473
 • Density543.7/km2 (1,408/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC-8 (PST)
Area code(s)250, 778, 236, & 672
Highways Hwy 6
Hwy 31A
WaterwaysSlocan Lake

New Denver is at the mouth of Carpenter Creek, on the east shore of Slocan Lake, in the West Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia. The village is 47 kilometres (29 mi) west of Kaslo on Highway 31A, and 47 kilometres (29 mi) southeast of Nakusp and 32 kilometres (20 mi) northeast of Slocan on Highway 6.[2]

Name origin[edit]

In 1892, the town was mostly called Slocan City or Slocan for about a month, Eldorado City or Eldorado for about seven months, and New Denver since. However, these names were used interchangeably for months.[3] Furthermore, the place may have been known as Carpenter Creek townsite after its founding in 1891.[4]

Appearing about the same time as the Slocan community at the foot of the lake, it is unclear why the latter prevailed in keeping the name. Until the government survey in mid 1892, the place was a squatters camp for miners.[3] Named for El Dorado, the legendary city of gold, the surrounding mines were hoped to bring comparable prosperity. On discovering the mines were silver deposits, the name changed to reflect the famed silver mines of Denver, Colorado.[5]:187

Japanese internment during World War II[edit]

One of the nine West Kootenay internment centres for Japanese Canadians during World War II, following their removal from the BC Coast, by 1942, the camp held 1,505 Japanese Canadians, who built 275 shacks in a fruit grove known as the "Orchard."[6] Other internment centres in the Slocan region were nearby at Slocan City, Lemon Creek, Rosebery, Kaslo and Sandon.

New Denver's Nikkei Internment Memorial Centre is dedicated to the history of the 27,000 interned Japanese Canadians, and is a National Historic Site.[7]

Doukhobor dormitory[edit]

For decades Freedomites refused to send their Doukhobor children to school. After multiple warnings, the government forcibly removed such children from their families. Operating 1953–1959, about 170 children, aged 7–15, passed through the New Denver facility but attended the public school. Although parents were allowed twice-monthly visits, most chose instead to speak to their children through the wire fence.[8]

Transport & economy[edit]

New Denver was an early service center for mines and the nearby mining towns. A landing on the lake, the stage ran every two days to Nakusp, and four days to Nelson.[9] In 1895, Denver Canyon became a stop on the former Nakusp and Slocan Railway. The settlement was incorporated as a village in 1929.[10] After the decline in mining, forestry became the economic base, and tourism in more recent times.

Government[edit]

Ken Casley served as mayor from 1982 until 1989, and then stepped down for health reasons. He was succeeded by Gary Wright.[11] Wright continued in the position until his retirement in 2011, and was succeeded by Ann Bunka. Leonard Casley was elected as mayor in October 2018.[12]

Communications[edit]

The town is notable for its resistance to mobile phones. In a 2008 referendum, many citizens voted against the introduction of cellular telephone service.[13] Despite this, on 20 July 2010, Telus Canada began installation of a cell phone facility in the heart of the village with many citizens peacefully protesting the installation.[14]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for New Denver
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 10.6
(51.1)
14
(57)
21
(70)
27.2
(81.0)
33.5
(92.3)
35.5
(95.9)
38.5
(101.3)
37.2
(99.0)
35.5
(95.9)
24
(75)
18.3
(64.9)
11.5
(52.7)
38.5
(101.3)
Average high °C (°F) 0.5
(32.9)
2.9
(37.2)
8.1
(46.6)
13.9
(57.0)
18.9
(66.0)
22.4
(72.3)
26.1
(79.0)
25.9
(78.6)
19.8
(67.6)
11.5
(52.7)
4.3
(39.7)
0.2
(32.4)
12.9
(55.2)
Daily mean °C (°F) −1.7
(28.9)
−0.3
(31.5)
3.6
(38.5)
8
(46)
12.5
(54.5)
16.1
(61.0)
19.1
(66.4)
18.9
(66.0)
13.9
(57.0)
7.5
(45.5)
2
(36)
−1.9
(28.6)
8.1
(46.6)
Average low °C (°F) −4
(25)
−3.5
(25.7)
−1.1
(30.0)
2
(36)
6
(43)
9.6
(49.3)
12
(54)
11.8
(53.2)
7.8
(46.0)
3.5
(38.3)
−0.4
(31.3)
−4
(25)
3.3
(37.9)
Record low °C (°F) −23.5
(−10.3)
−21
(−6)
−15.6
(3.9)
−7.2
(19.0)
−2
(28)
2.2
(36.0)
1.1
(34.0)
1.7
(35.1)
−1.5
(29.3)
−11
(12)
−23.5
(−10.3)
−28.9
(−20.0)
−28.9
(−20.0)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 100.8
(3.97)
57.1
(2.25)
62.7
(2.47)
61.6
(2.43)
66.1
(2.60)
84.2
(3.31)
60.8
(2.39)
54.9
(2.16)
55
(2.2)
70.1
(2.76)
105.2
(4.14)
94.2
(3.71)
872.6
(34.35)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 43.1
(1.70)
36.8
(1.45)
54.8
(2.16)
60.8
(2.39)
66
(2.6)
84.2
(3.31)
60.8
(2.39)
54.9
(2.16)
55
(2.2)
69.8
(2.75)
86.1
(3.39)
39
(1.5)
711.5
(28.01)
Average snowfall cm (inches) 57.6
(22.7)
20.3
(8.0)
7.9
(3.1)
0.7
(0.3)
0.1
(0.0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.3
(0.1)
19.1
(7.5)
55.2
(21.7)
161.1
(63.4)
Source: [15]

Flora and fauna[edit]

2019 saw a drastic increase in New Denver's native roof rat population. The Norwegian rat was introduced to the area the same year and is thought to have arrived by transport truck from other regions. [16] Council members blamed the infestation on local gardening and composting practices. [17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "British Columbia Regional Districts, Municipalities, Corporate Name, Date of Incorporation and Postal Address" (XLS). British Columbia Ministry of Communities, Sport and Cultural Development. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  2. ^ "New Denver". www.ourbc.com.
  3. ^ a b "Nelson Star, 26 Mar 2016". www.nelsonstar.com.
  4. ^ "Nelson Star, 2 Apr 2016". www.nelsonstar.com.
  5. ^ Akrigg, G.P.V.; Akrigg, Helen B. (1986). "British Columbia Place Names" (3rd, 1997 ed.). Vancouver: UBC Press. ISBN 0-7748-0636-2.
  6. ^ "New Denver Internment Camp". www.heritagebc.ca.
  7. ^ Nikkei Internment Memorial Centre. Canadian Register of Historic Places.
  8. ^ "Forced Doukhobor Schooling". www.doukhobor.org.
  9. ^ "1894 BC Directory". www.bccd.vpl.ca.
  10. ^ "New Denver (village)". BC Geographical Names.
  11. ^ Nesteroff, Greg (25 October 2012). "Former New Denver mayor publishes memoir". Nelson Star. Retrieved 6 November 2012.
  12. ^ Nesteroff, Greg (17 October 2011). "Nelson: 3 for mayor, 8 for council". Nelson Star. Retrieved 6 November 2012.
  13. ^ Metcalfe, Bill. "Why a Little BC Town Wants to Banish Cell Phones", "The Tyee", 2008-03-13.
  14. ^ "TELUS going live with 3G+ network in New Denver, BC on September 7th". MobileSyrup. 3 September 2010.
  15. ^ "Calculation Information for 1981 to 2010 Canadian Normals Data". Environment Canada. Archived from the original on 14 June 2013. Retrieved 9 July 2013.
  16. ^ Shafer, Timothy (7 October 2019). "Rat problem potentially plagues Slocan Valley village; could be sign of bigger problem". Retrieved 4 January 2021.
  17. ^ "New Denver battling influx of rats". 26 November 2019. Retrieved 4 January 2021.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 49°59′30″N 117°22′17″W / 49.99167°N 117.37139°W / 49.99167; -117.37139