New Jerusalem Airport

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New Jerusalem Airport
New Jerusalem Auxiliary Airfield
New Jerusalem Airport - California.jpg
2006 USGS airphoto
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner City of Tracy
Serves Tracy, California
Elevation AMSL 62 ft / 19 m
Coordinates 37°40′40″N 121°18′04″W / 37.67778°N 121.30111°W / 37.67778; -121.30111Coordinates: 37°40′40″N 121°18′04″W / 37.67778°N 121.30111°W / 37.67778; -121.30111
Map
1Q4 is located in California
1Q4
1Q4
Location of New Jerusalem Airport
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
12/30 3,530 1,076 Asphalt
Statistics (2009)
Aircraft operations 4,000

New Jerusalem Airport (FAA LID: 1Q4) is a nontowered, public airport located seven nautical miles (8.1 miles; 13 km) southeast of the central business district of Tracy, a city in San Joaquin County, California, United States. It is owned by the City of Tracy.[1]

Facilities and aircraft[edit]

New Jerusalem Airport covers an area of 394 acres (159 ha) at an elevation of 62 feet (19 m) above mean sea level. It has one runway designated 12/30 with an asphalt surface measuring 3,530 by 60 feet (1,076 × 18 m). A second, parallel runway was built initially but fell into disrepair and is not used by general aviation.

For the 12-month period ending December 9, 2009, the airport had 4,000 general aviation aircraft operations, an average of 10 per day.[1] New Jerusalem Airport has been used in several installments of the Discovery Channel television show MythBusters, including the "Duct Tape Plane" episode (#174)[2] and to test drive their JATO Rocket Car, JATO 3, for the episode "JATO Rocket Car: Mission Accomplished?"[citation needed]

World War II[edit]

During World War II, the airport was designated as New Jerusalem Auxiliary Airfield (No 2), and was an auxiliary training airfield for Stockton Army Airfield, California.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c FAA Airport Master Record for 1Q4 (Form 5010 PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. Effective 30 June 2011.
  2. ^ Wiebe, James (20 October 2011). "Mythbuster Duct Tape Airplane production photos". Belite Ultralight Blog: The Blog for Ultralight Aircraft. Retrieved 13 June 2013. 

External links[edit]