North Carolina–South Carolina football rivalry

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North Carolina–South Carolina football rivalry
First meeting October 10, 1903
North Carolina, 17–0
Latest meeting September 3, 2015
South Carolina, 17–13
Next meeting August 31, 2019
Statistics
Meetings total 57
All-time series North Carolina leads, 34–19–4
Largest victory North Carolina, 48–0 (1914)
Longest win streak North Carolina, 5 (1903–11)
South Carolina, 5 (1967–74)
Current win streak South Carolina, 3 (2007–present)

The North Carolina–South Carolina football rivalry, also known as Battle of the Carolinas, is an American college football rivalry between the North Carolina Tar Heels football team of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and South Carolina Gamecocks football team of the University of South Carolina. North Carolina leads the series 34–19–4.[1]

Series history[edit]

The series started in 1903 with a win for North Carolina in Columbia, South Carolina. The teams last met in 2015; South Carolina won 17–13.[2] The teams will play in Charlotte, North Carolina in 2019 for the 58th meeting. It was also announced that the teams agreed to meet in Charlotte in 2023.[3]

Geography[edit]

Being close geographically, both teams compete for recruits on an annual basis. North Carolina has pulled players such as Robert Quinn and Quinshad Davis out of South Carolina in recent years. South Carolina has done the same by recruiting Larenz Bryant and Connor Mitch from North Carolina. Proximity also plays a role because in some areas of the two states there are significant populations of fans for each team. For example, Charlotte, North Carolina is closer to Columbia than Chapel Hill. Location can lead to ". . .families with Gamecocks and Tar Heels split down the middle. Couples where the man bleeds Carolina Blue, and the woman is all about the Garnet and Black. The fight, when it is present, is very real."[4]

The usage of "Carolina"[edit]

Both North and South Carolina make use of "Carolina" as a moniker. From 1999 to 2004, North Carolina had "Carolina Tar Heels" written on its interlocking N and C logo. South Carolina uses only a "C", which is used to start the title "Carolina". The official color of UNC is "Carolina Blue", which is an officially licensed color. Both schools use end zones painted with the title "Carolina" and "Tar Heels" or "Gamecocks" across them. Both schools use the script "Carolina" on a number of their sports uniforms. Both have the moniker trademarked.[5][6]

North Carolina fans argue that it was the first public university in America, and claimed the nickname first. Also, the Province of Carolina was founded in what is modern day North Carolina, however the principal seat of government was in Charles Town.[7][8]

South Carolina fans argues that it became a state first.[9]

Both schools have referred to themselves as simply "Carolina", even when playing each other.[10][11]

Gamecocks leave the ACC[edit]

North Carolina and South Carolina spent 49 years in the same athletic conferences, first in the Southern Conference and later in the Atlantic Coast Conference, until the Gamecocks left the ACC to become independent in 1971. The reason for South Carolina's departure was how much control and influence UNC and the other North Carolina schools had on the ACC and Gamecock coach Frank McGuire's displeasure with conference officials who he felt were biased in favor of the "Tobacco Road" schools. Some high-profile South Carolina recruits did not meet the academic requirements to play in the ACC. Gamecock player Mike Grosso never played a game with South Carolina, because Duke University questioned his academic standing.[12]

Game results[edit]

North Carolina victoriesSouth Carolina victoriesTie games
No.DateLocationWinnerScore
1 October 10, 1903 Columbia, SC North Carolina 17–0
2 October 15, 1904 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 27–0
3 November 18, 1908 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 22–0
4 November 19, 1910 Durham, NC North Carolina 27–6
5 November 11, 1911 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 21–0
6 November 9, 1912 Chapel Hill, NC Tie6–6
7 October 10, 1913 Columbia, SC North Carolina 13–3
8 October 12, 1914 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 48–0
9 October 16, 1920 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 7–0
10 October 15, 1921 Columbia, SC Tie7–7
11 October 14, 1922 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 10–7
12 November 3, 1923 Columbia, SC North Carolina 13–0
13 November 1, 1924 Columbia, SC South Carolina 10–7
14 October 3, 1925 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 7–0
15 October 9, 1926 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 7–0
16 October 15, 1927 Chapel Hill, NC South Carolina14–6
17 November 10, 1928 Columbia, SC Tie0–0
18 November 19, 1929 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 40–0
19 November 21, 1936 Columbia, SC North Carolina 14–0
20 September 5, 1937 Chapel Hill, NC Tie13–13
21 September 27, 1941 Chapel Hill, NC South Carolina 13–7[13]
22 October 3, 1942 Columbia, SC North Carolina 13–7
23 November 6, 1943 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 21–6
24 November 4, 1944 Columbia, SC South Carolina6–0
25 October 8, 1949 Chapel Hill, NC #6 North Carolina 28–13
26 November 18, 1950 Columbia, SC North Carolina 14–7
27 October 13, 1951 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 21–6
28 November 15, 1952 Columbia, SC North Carolina 27–19
29 September 24, 1953 Columbia, SC South Carolina 18–0
No.DateLocationWinnerScore
30 September 30, 1954 Columbia, SC North Carolina 21–19
31 November 1, 1955 Norfolk, VA North Carolina 32–14
32 September 24, 1956 Columbia, SC South Carolina14–0
33 September 25, 1957 Columbia, SC North Carolina 28–6
34 September 24, 1958 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 6–0
35 October 10, 1959 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 19–6
36 October 22, 1960 Columbia, SC South Carolina22–6
37 October 21, 1961 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 17–0
38 October 20, 1962 Columbia, SC North Carolina 19–14
39 October 26, 1963 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 7–0
40 October 24, 1964 Columbia, SC North Carolina 24–6
41 September 23, 1967 Chapel Hill, NC South Carolina 16–10
42 September 28, 1968 Columbia, SC South Carolina 32–27
43 September 27, 1969 Chapel Hill, NC South Carolina 14–6
44 October 10, 1970 Chapel Hill, NC South Carolina 35–21
45 October 26, 1974 Columbia, SC South Carolina 31–23
46 October 22, 1977 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 17–0
47 October 28, 1978 Columbia, SC North Carolina 24–22
48 September 8, 1979 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 28–0
49 October 24, 1981 Chapel Hill, NC South Carolina 31–13
50 September 3, 1983 Columbia, SC #11 North Carolina 24–8
51 September 3, 1988 Columbia, SC #19 South Carolina 31–10
52 November 11, 1989 Chapel Hill, NC South Carolina 27–20
53 September 8, 1990 Columbia, SC South Carolina 27–5
54 November 16, 1991 Chapel Hill, NC North Carolina 21–17
55 October 3, 2007 Chapel Hill, NC #7 South Carolina 21–15
56 August 29, 2013 Columbia, SC #6 South Carolina 27–10
57 September 3, 2015 Charlotte, NC South Carolina 17–13
Series: North Carolina leads 34–19–4

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Winsipedia - North Carolina Tar Heels vs. South Carolina Gamecocks football series history". Winsipedia. 
  2. ^ "North Carolina Tar Heels vs. South Carolina Gamecocks - Box Score - August 29, 2013 - ESPN". ESPN.com. 
  3. ^ http://www.fbschedules.com/2015/09/north-carolina-south-carolina-charlotte-2019-2023/
  4. ^ Felder, Michael. "The Carolina Rivalry Nobody Notices". Retrieved 2015-08-18. 
  5. ^ "University of South Carolina". www.sc.edu. Retrieved 2015-08-18. 
  6. ^ "The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill -". The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 2015-08-18. 
  7. ^ "Maisel: I-Formation - College Football - ESPN". sports.espn.go.com. Retrieved 2015-08-18. 
  8. ^ Medley, Mary-louise (1976). History of Anson County, North Carolina, 1750-1976. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company. ISBN 9780806347554. 
  9. ^ "South Carolina - U.S. States - HISTORY.com". HISTORY.com. Retrieved 2015-08-18. 
  10. ^ "7 Reasons Why There is Only One Carolina". Retrieved 2015-08-18. 
  11. ^ "7 Reasons Why There Is Only One Real Carolina: A Rebuttal". Retrieved 2015-08-18. 
  12. ^ "Spats Caused S.c. To Split From Acc". Retrieved 2015-08-19. 
  13. ^ News and Observer, 28 September 1941