North Carolina Highway 51

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NC Highway 51 marker

NC Highway 51
Route information
Maintained by NCDOT
Length: 22.2 mi[1] (35.7 km)
Existed: 1934 – present
Major junctions
South end: SC 51 near Fort Mill, SC
 
North end: NC 24 / NC 27 in Mint Hill
Location
Counties: Mecklenburg
Highway system
NC 50 US 52

North Carolina Highway 51 (NC 51) is a primary state highway in the state of North Carolina. Entirely in Mecklenburg County, it connects the suburban towns of Pineville, Matthews and Mint Hill.

Route description[edit]

Though NC 51 begins at the state line, SC 51 is a short 1-mile-long (1.6 km) road that connects with US 21, near Fort Mill. Crossing the state line, NC 51 quickly becomes a four-lane road as it goes through the town of Pineville. After its first intersection with I-485, it enters the Charlotte city limits. In Charlotte, NC 51 crosses the busy intersections of Johnston Road and Providence Road, known for rush-hour traffic during the weekdays. In Matthews, NC 51 bypasses the main downtown area, followed by a semi-controlled interchanged with US 74 (Independence Boulevard). As the NC 51 enters Mint Hill, the road narrows to two-lane. NC 51 crosses intersects I-485 again, before ending at NC 24/NC 27 (Albemarle Road).[2][1]

History[edit]

The first NC 51 was an original state highway that traveled from NC 20, in Rockingham, to NC 74, in Wadeville.[3] In 1928, Rockingham to Ellerbe became an extension of NC 75.[4] In 1934, NC 51 was decommissioned in favor of NC 73, between Ellerbe and Mount Gilead, and NC 109, between Mount Gilead and Wadeville.[5]

The second and current NC 51 was established in 1934 as a renumbering of NC 276, between US 21/US 521, in Pineville, to NC 27, near Allen.[5] In 1968, NC 51 was extended to the South Carolina state line, replacing a segment of US 21.[6] In 1981, NC 51 was placed on new alignment in Pineville, abandoning an old routing along Lee Street and eliminating a short concurrency with US 521.[7] In 1995, NC 51 was placed on new bypass north of downtown Matthews, marked as Matthews Township Parkway. The old alignment along Matthews-Mint Hill Road was downgraded to secondary road.[8]

North Carolina Highway 276[edit]

NC Highway 276
Location: Pineville-Allen, North Carolina
Length: 20.4 mi[9] (32.8 km)
Existed: 1930–1934

North Carolina Highway 276 (NC 276) appeared in 1930 as new primary routing from NC 26, in Pineville, to NC 27 , near Allen.[4] In 1934, it was renumbered as the second NC 51.[5]

Junction list[edit]

The entire route is in Mecklenburg County.

Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Pineville 0.0 0.0 SC 51 south – Fort Mill South Carolina state line
2.5–
2.8
4.0–
4.5
I‑485 – Matthews, Huntersville I-485 exit 64
Charlotte 8.5 13.7 NC 16 (Providence Road) – Waxhaw
Matthews 13.1–
13.4
21.1–
21.6
US 74 (Independence Boulevard) – Charlotte, Monroe Interchange
Mint Hill 18.9 30.4 NC 218 east (Fairview Road) / Wilgrove Mint Hill Road – Fairview Western terminus of NC 218
20.6–
20.7
33.2–
33.3
I‑485 – Matthews, Huntersville I-485 exit 43
22.2 35.7 NC 24 / NC 27 (Albemarle Road) – Charlotte, Albemarle
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Google (February 28, 2016). "North Carolina Highway 51" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved February 28, 2016. 
  2. ^ Mecklenburg County, North Carolina (PDF) (Map). North Carolina Department of Transportation. August 2015. Retrieved February 28, 2016. 
  3. ^ State Highway System of North Carolina (PDF) (Map). Cartography by NCSHC. North Carolina State Highway Commission. 1922. Retrieved February 28, 2016. 
  4. ^ a b State Highway System of North Carolina (PDF) (Map). Cartography by NCSHC. North Carolina State Highway Commission. 1930. Retrieved February 28, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c North Carolina Primary Highway System (PDF) (Map). Cartography by NCSHC. North Carolina State Highway and Public Works Commission. 1940. Retrieved February 28, 2016. 
  6. ^ "Route Change (1968-10-25)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. October 25, 1968. Retrieved February 28, 2016. 
  7. ^ "Route Change (1981-04-01)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. April 1, 1981. Retrieved February 28, 2016. 
  8. ^ "Route Change (1995-02-20)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. February 20, 1995. Retrieved February 28, 2016. 
  9. ^ Google (February 28, 2016). "North Carolina Highway 276" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved February 28, 2016. 

External links[edit]