Olperer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Olperer
Olperer und Schrammacher.jpg
The Olperer (right) and Schrammacher
Highest point
Elevation 3,476 m (AA) (11,404 ft)
Prominence 1,230 m (4,040 ft)
Isolation 11.4 kilometres (7.1 mi)
Coordinates 47°03′12″N 11°39′32″E / 47.05333°N 11.65889°E / 47.05333; 11.65889Coordinates: 47°03′12″N 11°39′32″E / 47.05333°N 11.65889°E / 47.05333; 11.65889
Geography
Olperer is located in Austria
Olperer
Olperer
Parent range Zillertal Alps
Geology
Mountain type Granite, gneiss
rock summit
Climbing
First ascent 1867 Paul Grohmann, Georg Samer and Jakob Huber over the southeast ridge (Südostgrat)
Easiest route Olperer Hut, southeast ridge (with small Schneegupf firn field), or north ridge from Geraer Hut over sections of glacier

The Olperer is a 3,476 metre high mountain in the Zillertal Alps in the Austrian federal state of Tyrol. It is the main summit on the Tux Crest (Tuxer Kamm) and is often crossed in the summer as climbers transit from the Olperer Hut to the Geraer Hut. It was first climbed on 10 September 1867 along the southeast ridge (Südostgrat) by Paul Grohmann, Georg Samer and Gainer Jackl.[1] On its north flank is the ski region known as Hintertux Glacier on the Gefrorene-Wand-Kees glacier (also called the Tuxer Ferner).

Location and area[edit]

View from the Gefrorenen Wandspitzen.

The Olperer, with its pyramidal summit block, presents a striking appearance. As a result of that and because of its geographical prominence over its nearby peaks, the summit is a popular viewing point. It lies about four kilometres as the crow flies northwest of the Schlegeisspeicher dam and seven kilometres south of Hintertux. Its neighbours are, to the north and separated by the Wildlahnerscharte (3,220 m),the Großer Kaserer at 3,266 metres, to the southeast along the crest the 3,381 metre high Fußstein and, to the northeast, separated by the Großes Riepenkees glacier, lie the twin peaks of the Gefrorene-Wand-Spitzen, the southern summit of which lies at a height of 3,270 metres.

Sources and maps[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zeitschrift des Deutschen und Oesterreichischen Alpenvereins, Vol. II, 1870/71, Munich, 1871, pp. 132 f.

External links[edit]