Or HaNer

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Or HaNer
אוֹר הַנֵּר
اور هانر
PikiWiki Israel 15769 The mural quot;Germinationquot; in Kibbutz Or Ha.JPG
Etymology: 'Light of the Candle'
Or HaNer is located in Ashkelon region of Israel
Or HaNer
Or HaNer
Or HaNer is located in Israel
Or HaNer
Or HaNer
Coordinates: 31°33′27″N 34°36′7″E / 31.55750°N 34.60194°E / 31.55750; 34.60194Coordinates: 31°33′27″N 34°36′7″E / 31.55750°N 34.60194°E / 31.55750; 34.60194
Country Israel
DistrictSouthern
CouncilSha'ar HaNegev
AffiliationKibbutz Movement
Founded1957
Founded byFormer Giv'ot Zaid residents and Argentine Jews
Population
 (2019)[1]
769

Or HaNer (Hebrew: אוֹר הַנֵּר, lit. Light of the Candle) is a kibbutz in southern Israel. Located near Sderot, it fall under the jurisdiction of Sha'ar HaNegev Regional Council. In 2019 it had a population of 769.[1]

Etymology[edit]

Its name is taken from the Sanhedrin tractate of the Babylonian Talmud.[2]

History[edit]

Or HaNer was established in 1955–57 as a farm belonging to the Yitzur UFitu'ah company. The founders were from the gar'in of the Gordoniya, Dror and HeHalutz movements, most of whom were immigrants from Argentina and Chile. Many of them originally came from the kibbutz Giv'ot Zaid.[2]

The kibbutz was founded on the land belonging to the depopulated Palestinian village of Najd, northeast of the Najd village site.[3]

Thomas A. Shannon Jr. visits the kibbutz

In 2016, U.S. Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs, Thomas A. Shannon Jr. visited the kibbutz and received a tour of the kibbutz factory, Ornit.[4] Ornit, established in 1975, manufactures blind rivets.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Population in the Localities 2019" (XLS). Israel Central Bureau of Statistics. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  2. ^ a b HaReuveni, Immanuel (1999). Lexicon of the Land of Israel (in Hebrew). Miskal Yedioth Ahronoth Books. p. 23. ISBN 965-448-413-7.
  3. ^ Khalidi, Walid (1992). All That Remains:The Palestinian Villages Occupied and Depopulated by Israel in 1948. Washington D.C.: Institute for Palestine Studies. p. 128. ISBN 0-88728-224-5.
  4. ^ Thomas Shannon in Southern Israel
  5. ^ Ornit website