Patricia Morgan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Patricia Morgan
Minority Leader of Rhode Island House of Representatives
In office
January 3, 2017 – October 4, 2018
Preceded byBrian Newberry
Succeeded byBlake Filippi
Member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives
from the 26th district
In office
January 2011 – January 2019
Preceded byWilliam Murphy
Succeeded byJames Jackson
Personal details
Born (1950-08-25) August 25, 1950 (age 69)
Ohio, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
EducationMississippi State University
Kent State University (BA)
Rhode Island College (MEd)

Patricia L. Morgan[1] (born 1950 in Ohio, United States) is an American politician who was a Republican member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives representing District 26 from January 2011 to January 2019.[2] She became the first female minority leader of the Rhode Island House of Representatives in 2017, after she was chosen by the Republican caucus members on November 15, 2016 when former minority leader Brian Newberry stepped down from the position.[3]

Morgan ran for Governor of Rhode Island in the 2018 election.[4] She lost the primary to Cranston Mayor and 2014 Republican candidate Allan Fung.

On October 4, Rhode Island House Republicans voted to remove Morgan from her position as House Minority Leader following her endorsement of independent candidate Joe Trillo, a former House colleague, for Governor over Fung.

Education[edit]

Morgan attended Mississippi State University, earned her BA degree from Kent State University, her MEd from Rhode Island College, and principal's certificate from Providence College.[5]

Elections[edit]

  • 2016 Morgan was unopposed for the September 13, 2016 Republican Primary and won the November 8, 2016 General election with 3,192 votes (55.2%) against Democratic nominee Anthony J. Paolino who had 2,079 votes (35.9%) and Independent Vincent Marzullo who had 504 votes (8.7%).[6]
  • 2014 Morgan was unopposed for the September 9, 2014 Republican Primary, winning with 376 votes[7] and won the November 4, 2014 General election with 2,104 votes (50.1%) against Democratic nominee Nicholas Denice who had 1,816 votes (43.2%) and Moderate Paul Caianiello, Jr. who had 275 votes (6.6%).[8]
  • 2012 Morgan was unopposed for the September 11, 2012 Republican Primary, winning with 129 votes[9] and won the November 6, 2012 General election with 2,849 votes (52.1%) against Democratic nominee Nicholas Denice.[10]
  • 2010 When Democratic Representative William Murphy retired and left the seat open, Morgan was unopposed for the September 23, 2010 Republican Primary, winning with 220 votes[11] and won the November 2, 2010 General election by 90 votes with 2,239 votes (51%) against Democratic nominee Michael Senerchia.[12]
  • 2004 To challenge District 26 incumbent Representative Murphy, Morgan was unopposed for the 2004 Republican Primary, but lost to the November 2, 2004 General election to Representative Murphy.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Patricia Morgan's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  2. ^ "Representative Patricia L. Morgan". Providence, Rhode Island: Rhode Island General Assembly. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  3. ^ Anderson, Patrick (November 16, 2016). "GOP Rep. Patricia Morgan becomes first woman elected R.I. House minority leader". Providence Journal. Retrieved 20 June 2017.
  4. ^ "Patricia Morgan first to formally announce 2018 run for RI governor". WPRI 12. October 23, 2017.
  5. ^ Meet Patricia
  6. ^ "2016 General Election, Representative in General Assembly District 26". Providence, Rhode Island: Secretary of State of Rhode Island. Retrieved June 20, 2017.
  7. ^ "2014 Statewide Primary, Representative in General Assembly District 26". Providence, Rhode Island: Secretary of State of Rhode Island. Retrieved June 20, 2017.
  8. ^ "2014 General Election, Representative in General Assembly District 26". Providence, Rhode Island: Secretary of State of Rhode Island. Retrieved June 20, 2017.
  9. ^ "2012 Statewide Primary, Representative in General Assembly District 26". Providence, Rhode Island: Secretary of State of Rhode Island. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  10. ^ "2012 General Election, Representative in General Assembly District 26". Providence, Rhode Island: Secretary of State of Rhode Island. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  11. ^ "2010 Statewide Primary, Representative in General Assembly District 26". Providence, Rhode Island: Secretary of State of Rhode Island. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  12. ^ "2010 General Election, Representative in General Assembly District 26". Providence, Rhode Island: Secretary of State of Rhode Island. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  13. ^ "State Representatives by District". State of Rhode Island Election Results. Rhode Island Board of Elections. Retrieved 20 June 2017.

External links[edit]

Rhode Island House of Representatives
Preceded by
Brian Newberry
Minority Leader of the Rhode Island House of Representatives
2017–2018
Succeeded by
Blake Filippi