Pecatu

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New Kuta Beach formerly Dreamland Beach, Pecatu, Bali beyond the cliffs

Pecatu is a region located in the southwestern peninsula of Bali, adjacent to the popular resort area of Nusa Dua that is located in the south-eastern end of the island. Pecatu is composed of hilly landscapes with limestone cliffs isolating small, short beaches. It also houses the renowned Uluwatu Temple that offers a spectacular performance of Kecak Dance with the Indian Ocean and magnificent sunset as its background. The area is popular for surfers and also nudists due to its location behind the cliffs with limited access.[1]

Administration[edit]

Pecatu is located in South Kuta District of the Badung Regency.

History[edit]

For decades, beaches around Pecatu had been well known by surfers and also nudists due to its location behind the cliffs with limited access.[1] Some of the Macadam small roads were built before the 1997 Asian financial crisis.

After the Asian financial crisis (followed by the Bali bombings) the number of tourists dropped significantly, but it remained popular with surfers and they were among the first to come back. One of the beaches found to be very popular with Australian surfers was named Dreamland Beach. In order to reach this beach one had to hike down a small path. During that time some illegal simple 'warung's (shacks) were built on the beach and provided food and beverages for sale.[2]

Since 2007, one area developer Pecatu Graha Bali (Kuta Golf Links Resort)[3] owned by Tommy Suharto, son of the former Indonesian president who occupied the largest area in Pecatu up to 400 hectares, re-instated the projects begun before the Asian financial crisis.[2] Previously Tommy had 600 hectares of land in the early 1990s and then sold 200 hectares to third parties and the proceeds are now used to finance the project with the new partner, a Balinese businessman, Made G. Putrawan.[4] Indonesia and Bali were not affected by the Global financial crisis 2007, so these projects are well underway and growing rapidly.

Not only the name is changing. Where Dreamland used to be modest and simple, New Kuta Beach in Pecatu is the expression of hope and dreams come true with its luxurious clifftop views and remote location. It boasts being even more remote than Nusa Dua. With the narrow beach just below the cliff walls it is perfect for watching the sunset or the amazingly skilled surfers. This is a big attraction as these waves are not for beginners! The warungs have been moved from the beach and upgraded into nice shops though not as easily accessible from the beach they are much improved.[1] The Entry/Parking Fee has also increased.

Waterpark[edit]

After soft opening at December 2010, since the end of January 2011 a new 5 hectares waterpark called "New Kuta Green Park" has been in operation with ticket price discrimination for international tourists, national tourists and Balinese.[5][6]

Desalination[edit]

To fulfill the freshwater needs, the seawater desalination plant currently provides 1,000 cubic meters of clean water per day from its total capacity of 3,000 cubic meters.[7]

Beaches[edit]

Pandawa Beach[edit]

The newest beach is a 20-minute drive from Garuda Wisnu Kencana, and has been developed by Badung Regency in Kutuh Village, South Kuta District. It was formerly known as the secret beach because it lies behind two cliffs with limited access. Now the panoramic views with a serene quiet atmosphere can be accessed easily through a 1.5-kilometer flanking cliff-cut road by big buses. Paragliding can be done at Timbis Hill, not far away from the Pandawa Beach.[8][9] There are no hotels or condos in the beach and access road areas, due to opposition from the local Kutuh people.[10]

Balangan Beach[edit]

Balangan Beach is located north of New Kuta Beach, Pecatu, also has the cliffs

Balangan Beach is one of the Bukit Peninsula surf spots located just north of New Kuta Beach. With its clear blue waves, white sandy beach, and easy access, Balangan is not as crowded as Kuta or other surfing beaches in Bali. In the north coast, there is a rocky hill with views from the sea to the shore of Kedonganan.

Bingin Beach[edit]

Bingin Beach is located south of New Kuta Beach, Pecatu, also has the cliffs

Located just one kilometer from New Kuta Beach to the south, the beach is not recommended for novice surfers due to its reef bed. The beach is filled with surfers from around the world between May and October, but its beauty makes it more appealing than New Kuta Beach for nonaquatic activities.[11] [12]

Impossible Beach[edit]

Impossible Beach is located between Bingin and Padang Padang. It is called Impossible Beach due to has a fast racing wave that is nearly impossible to surf except by some experts, but very picturesque.[13]

Padang Padang Beach[edit]

Padang Padang Beach is located at Jalan Labuhan Sait, Pecatu village, not far from the famous Uluwatu temple. The entrance to the beach to through a limestone cave inlet.[14] Entry is free here, and the beach is smaller than New Kuta Beach. The seas are calm here, with some of locals often coming with their families to swim here. Since Julia Roberts visited Padang Padang to act in the film Eat Pray Love, the beach has grown in popularity.[15] This beach is also very famous in the surf community due to the size and quality of the waves and the annual Rip Curl surfing contest held in July–August.

Nyang Nyang Beach[edit]

Unlike other beaches near Uluwatu Temple, Nyang Nyang Beach is located to the southeast of Uluwatu Temple. It is a hidden beach, suitable for surfing with large waves, and for sunbathing on the coarse white sandy beach. From the parking area a long stairway (more than 500 steep steps) connects visitors to the beach. A number of local vendors sell food and drinks along the way to Nyang Nyang beach.[16][17]

Pecatu vs Nusa Dua[edit]

Comparison Pecatu Nusa Dua
Area > 400 hectares < 400 hectares
Access Limited access Free easy access
Area developer Private company Government
Luxury More luxurious Lux
Activities Various Mostly hotel

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Dreamland to Be Renamed 'New Kuta Beach' as Pecatu Area to Get Resort". Thebalitimes.com. 2007-08-02. Retrieved 2012-03-05.
  2. ^ a b "Big project erases `dream' from Dreamland". The Jakarta Post. 2011-02-17. Retrieved 2012-03-05.
  3. ^ vath. "Dreamland Beach the steep rock walls for enjoying the sunset". amazing tourism traveling. Archived from the original on 2012-03-21. Retrieved 2012-03-05.
  4. ^ "New Kuta Beach The Ultimate Resort". July 4, 2009. Archived from the original on February 28, 2011. Retrieved April 29, 2011.
  5. ^ "Pecatu Indah Opens a Waterpark - Bali travel agency - Bali Alpes Travel provide you travel package around the island of gods of Bali and the Indonesia Archipelago". Balialpes.com. Retrieved 2012-03-05.
  6. ^ "About New Kuta Green Park – Bali". Archived from the original on April 20, 2014. Retrieved May 2, 2014.
  7. ^ "Bali News » Blog Archive » New Kuta Green Park". Seminyakvillasonline.com. 2010-12-27. Archived from the original on 2012-03-22. Retrieved 2012-03-05.
  8. ^ Desy Nurhayati (May 20, 2014). "Pandawa Beach developed as new destination". Archived from the original on May 20, 2014. Retrieved May 20, 2014.
  9. ^ "Pandawa Beach a New Rising Attraction in Bali". Retrieved May 20, 2014.
  10. ^ Iqbal Prawira. "Potensi Pantai Pandawa di Desa Kutuh, Kab Badung, Bali". Archived from the original on August 26, 2014. Retrieved August 24, 2014.
  11. ^ "Jimbaran | Kusamba dot com". Kusamba.com. Archived from the original on 2012-03-09. Retrieved 2012-03-05.
  12. ^ Jing Cho Yang (January 20, 2015). "Top Beaches in the Uluwatu Area".
  13. ^ "Bali Surf Spots". Archived from the original on May 31, 2012. Retrieved June 15, 2012.
  14. ^ "Padang-Padang Beach". April 8, 2011.
  15. ^ "Bali is not just Kuta | Travel and Tourism". Dreamscometruela.org. 2011-02-02. Archived from the original on 2012-02-24. Retrieved 2012-03-05.
  16. ^ Bram Setiawan (June 23, 2014). "Nyang Nyang Beach, worth the trek". Archived from the original on June 27, 2014. Retrieved June 23, 2014.
  17. ^ Wayan Suadnyana. "Pantai Nyang Nyang Bali". Retrieved January 21, 2015.

Coordinates: 8°49′29″S 115°06′43″E / 8.8247°S 115.1119°E / -8.8247; 115.1119