Politics of San Francisco

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
San Francisco City Hall illuminated in commemorative red, white, and blue lighting on Election Day November 6, 2018

Following the social upheavals of the 1960s, San Francisco became one of the centers of progressive activism, with Democrats, and progressives dominating city politics. This continuing trend is also visible in the results of presidential elections; the last Republican to win San Francisco was Dwight Eisenhower in 1956. Although the fight between Democrats and Republicans has been unequal for the last forty years, it has become increasingly lopsided, with conservative commentators frequently attacking the city's politics using the ad hominem phrase, "San Francisco values".[1] In spite of its heavy liberal leanings, San Francisco has the highest percentage of "no party preference" voters of any California county, as of November, 2012.[2] Campaign corruption is monitored by the San Francisco Ethics Commission and violations result in fines up to $5,000 per violation.

State and federal representation[edit]

United States presidential election results for San Francisco County, California[3]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 56,417 12.72% 378,156 85.26% 8,980 2.02%
2016 37,688 9.23% 345,084 84.47% 25,769 6.31%
2012 47,076 13.01% 301,723 83.40% 12,996 3.59%
2008 52,292 13.66% 322,220 84.16% 8,353 2.18%
2004 54,355 15.21% 296,772 83.02% 6,338 1.77%
2000 51,496 16.10% 241,578 75.54% 26,712 8.35%
1996 45,479 15.66% 209,777 72.24% 35,129 12.10%
1992 57,352 17.80% 233,263 72.40% 31,592 9.80%
1988 72,503 26.14% 201,887 72.78% 3,004 1.08%
1984 90,219 31.44% 193,278 67.35% 3,475 1.21%
1980 80,967 31.87% 133,184 52.43% 39,877 15.70%
1976 103,561 40.31% 133,733 52.06% 19,594 7.63%
1972 127,461 41.82% 170,882 56.07% 6,427 2.11%
1968 100,970 33.66% 177,509 59.18% 21,468 7.16%
1964 92,994 28.71% 230,758 71.24% 156 0.05%
1960 143,001 41.79% 197,734 57.78% 1,484 0.43%
1956 173,648 51.53% 161,766 48.01% 1,553 0.46%
1952 198,158 52.88% 172,312 45.99% 4,230 1.13%
1948 160,135 45.66% 167,726 47.82% 22,848 6.51%
1944 134,163 38.92% 208,609 60.51% 1,959 0.57%
1940 122,449 39.26% 185,607 59.51% 3,822 1.23%
1936 65,436 24.69% 196,197 74.04% 3,368 1.27%
1932 70,152 31.43% 144,236 64.62% 8,809 3.95%
1928 95,987 49.11% 96,632 49.44% 2,849 1.46%
1924 73,494 47.75% 9,811 6.37% 70,615 45.88%
1920 96,105 65.18% 32,637 22.13% 18,708 12.69%
1916 63,093 42.30% 78,225 52.45% 7,834 5.25%
1912 0 0.00% 48,953 48.40% 52,195 51.60%
1908 33,184 55.19% 21,260 35.36% 5,680 9.45%
1904 39,816 60.86% 18,027 27.55% 7,584 11.59%
1900 35,208 55.71% 25,212 39.89% 2,782 4.40%
1896 31,041 49.20% 30,649 48.58% 1,396 2.21%
1892 24,416 41.78% 31,022 53.09% 2,997 5.13%
1888 25,708 46.14% 28,699 51.51% 1,310 2.35%
1884 25,509 53.46% 21,202 44.43% 1,008 2.11%
1880 19,080 46.27% 21,471 52.06% 688 1.67%

In the California State Senate, San Francisco is in the 11th Senate District, represented by Democrat Scott Wiener. In the California State Assembly, it is split between the 17th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Matt Haney, and the 19th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Phil Ting.[4]

In the United States House of Representatives, San Francisco is split between two congressional districts. Most of the city is in the 12th District, represented by Nancy Pelosi (DSan Francisco). A sliver in the southwest is part of the 14th District represented by Jackie Speier (DHillsborough).[5] Pelosi has been the current House Speaker since January 3, 2019, a post she also held from 2007 through 2011. She has also held the post of House Minority Leader, from 2003 to 2007 and 2011 to 2019.

Local politics[edit]

The city is governed by a mayor and an 11-member Board of Supervisors, both elected using preferential voting. The current mayor is London Breed.

Housing[edit]

Housing is a frequent topic in San Francisco politics.

San Francisco has the highest housing prices in the United States.[6] As of 2018, its median house price was $1.61 million, almost twice the average from five years earlier.[7] Many factors contribute to the housing situation in San Francisco. One of the main reasons for this is the lack of available homes to live in. The Bay Area, from 2011 to 2015, only created 1 home for every 8 jobs created.[8]

San Francisco has some of the most stringent housing laws in the United States. It ranks 3rd among cities in the United States as the hardest city to build in.[9]

It has been estimated by San Francisco's chief economist that in order for prices in San Francisco to stabilize, the city would need around 100,000 units to reduce prices.[10]

Voter registration statistics, 2013[edit]

Total population[11] 797,983
  Registered voters[12][note 1] 497,663 62.4%
    Democratic[12] 276,855 55.6%
    Republican[12] 42,922 8.6%
    Democratic–Republican spread[12] +233,933 +47.0%
    Independent[12] 8,918 1.8%
    Green[12] 8,215 1.7%
    Libertarian[12] 3,028 0.6%
    Peace and Freedom[12] 1,727 0.3%
    Americans Elect[12] 23 0.0%
    Other[12] 1,284 0.3%
    No party preference[12] 154,691 31.1%

Voter participation statistics[edit]

  • Total Registration and Turnout
    • November 6, 2018[13]
      • Registration 500,516
      • Turnout 345,806
    • June 5, 2018[14]
      • Registration 481,991
      • Turnout 253,583
    • November 8, 2016[15]
      • Registration 513,573[16]
      • Turnout 414,528
    • June 7, 2016[17]
      • Registration 468,238
      • Turnout 264,993
    • November 3, 2015[18]
      • Registration 446,828
      • Turnout 203,069
    • November 4, 2014[19]
      • Registration 436,019
      • Turnout 231,214
    • June 3, 2014[20]
      • Registration 435,757
      • Turnout 129,399
    • November 5, 2013[21]
      • Registration 440,037
      • Turnout 128,937
    • November 6, 2012[22]
      • Registration 502,841
      • Turnout 364,875
    • June 5, 2012[23]
      • Registration 470,668
      • Turnout 145105

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Percentage of registered voters with respect to total population. Percentages of party members with respect to registered voters follow.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Garofoli, Joe (November 3, 2006). "Three Dirty Words: San Francisco Values". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved June 24, 2017.
  2. ^ "Historical Voter Registration Statistics" (PDF). 15-Day Report of Registration for the November 6, 2012, General Election. Secretary of State of California. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 7, 2012. Retrieved January 3, 2013.
  3. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections".
  4. ^ "Communities of Interest — County". California Citizens Redistricting Commission. Archived from the original on October 23, 2015. Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  5. ^ "California's 12th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 12, 2013.
  6. ^ "San Francisco has highest rent prices in the world, claims housing startup". Curbed SF. Retrieved 2018-02-22.
  7. ^ "San Francisco's median house price climbs to $1.61 million". Curbed SF. Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  8. ^ "Workforce Housing - Bay Area Council". Bay Area Council. Retrieved 2018-02-22.
  9. ^ "The Toughest Places to Build: Behind the Scenes of a Wall Street Journal Analysis". www.buildzoom.com. Retrieved 2018-02-22.
  10. ^ Lamb, Jonah Owen (February 12, 2014). "Leveling SF housing field could take 100,000 new units". The San Francisco Examiner. Retrieved 2018-02-22.
  11. ^ U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B02001. U.S. Census website. Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k California Secretary of State. February 10, 2013 - Report of Registration Archived November 3, 2013, at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved 2013-10-31.
  13. ^ "California General Election County Reporting Status". California General Election Tuesday, November 6, 2018 Semi-Official Election Results. November 15, 2018. Archived from the original on November 16, 2018.
  14. ^ "June 5, 2018 Election Results". sfelections.sfgov.org. June 27, 2018. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  15. ^ "November 8, 2016 Election Results". sfelections.sfgov.org. June 20, 2017. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  16. ^ "SFDOE Results November 8, 2016". sfelections.org. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  17. ^ "SFDOE Results June 7, 2016". sfelections.org. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  18. ^ "SFDOE Results November 3, 2015". sfelections.org. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  19. ^ "SFDOE Results November 4, 2014". sfelections.org. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  20. ^ "SFDOE Results June 3, 2014". sfelections.org. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  21. ^ "SFDOE Results November 5, 2013". sfelections.org. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  22. ^ "SFDOE Results November 6, 2012". sfelections.org. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  23. ^ "SFDOE Results June 5, 2012, Consolidated Presidential Primary Election". sfelections.org. Retrieved 7 November 2018.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]