Pravda (play)

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Original National Theatre poster

Pravda is a satirical play by David Hare and Howard Brenton exploring the role of journalism in society. It was first produced at the National Theatre in London on 2 May 1985, directed by Hare and starring Anthony Hopkins in the role of Lambert Le Roux, white South African media mogul.[1] It is a satire on the mid-1980s newspaper industry, in particular the Australian media and press baron Rupert Murdoch.[2][3] Its title refers to the Russian Communist party newspaper Pravda.

The play won 1985 Best Play Award from both the London Evening Standard Awards and City Limits magazine.[4] It has been described as "one of the biggest hits in the history of the National Theatre."[5]

Original cast[edit]

  • Andrew May - Tim McInnerny
  • Bill Smiley - Richard Hope
  • Bishop of Putney - Daniel Thorndike
  • Cartoonist - William Sleigh
  • Cliveden Whicker-Baskett - Guy Williams
  • D P P Payne - Christopher Baines
  • Donna Le Roux - Zoe Rutland
  • Eaton Sylvester - Bill Nighy
  • Elliot Fruit-Norton - Basil Henson
  • Hamish McLennan; Hannon Spot - Fred Pearson
  • Harry Morrison - Ron Pember
  • Jack ‘Breaker’ Bond - Bill Moody
  • Journalist - Robert Ralph
  • Journalist - Paul Stewart
  • Lambert Le Roux - Anthony Hopkins
  • Larry Punt - Mark Jax
  • Leander Scroop - Nigel Le Vaillant
  • Lord Silk; Ian Ape-Warden - Olivier Pierre
  • Michael Quince M.P. - Peter Blythe
  • Miles Foley; Mac ‘Whipper’ Wellington; *Doug Fantom - Ian Bartholomew
  • Moira Patterson - Patricia Franklin
  • Newsvendor - Glenn Williams
  • Photographer - Desmond Adams
  • Princess Jill - Harriet Thorpe
  • Rebecca Foley - Kate Buffery
  • Sir Stamford Foley - Ivor Roberts
  • Suzie Fontaine - Miranda Foster
  • Waiter - Norman Warwick

Critical reception[edit]

Punch called it "A savagely bitchy and often wildly funny evening"; the Financial Times noted "A magnificent epic drama"; and The Observer wrote of "sulphorous and crackling entertainment."[6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Production of Pravda | Theatricalia". theatricalia.com.
  2. ^ "Pravda - Drama Online". www.dramaonlinelibrary.com.
  3. ^ "BBC - The National Theatre At 50: Pravda - Media Centre". www.bbc.co.uk.
  4. ^ Publications, Europa (November 24, 2003). "International Who's Who of Authors and Writers 2004". Psychology Press – via Google Books.
  5. ^ Lee, Alex Sierz and Marc (August 25, 2006). "Return to the street of shame" – via www.telegraph.co.uk.
  6. ^ "Pravda | Samuel French". www.samuelfrench.com.
  7. ^ Brenton, Howard; Hare, David (May 21, 2015). "Pravda". Bloomsbury Publishing – via Google Books.

External links[edit]