Punta Del Este Sevens

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Punta del Este Sevens
Punta Del Este Sevens logo.png
Seven Punta logo
SportRugby sevens
Founded1989
No. of teams21 (2014)
Most recent
champion(s)
South Africa Academy
Official websitesevenpunta.uy
Brazil and Fiji at Punta del Este in 2017.

The Punta del Este Sevens is an annual international rugby sevens tournament held in Uruguay, hosted at the resort city of the same name in Maldonado Department since 1989.[1][2][3] It was formerly part of the IRB Sevens World Series for the inaugural 1999-2000 circuit.

It is organised by the Old Boys Club usually the second weekend of January and counts with the participation of clubs from Uruguay and neighboring countries such as Argentina with selected provincial and national teams. Games are played at the Estadio Domingo Burgueño.

Internationally, it is the highest profile Uruguayan rugby event,[4] and has attracted players of the calibre of Jonah Lomu in the past,[5][6] as well as teams like Fiji, Argentina, New Zealand, Samoa and Belgium Barbarians

International sevens[edit]

The tournament was first played in 1989 and featured mostly club teams from Uruguay and Argentina in the early years. Its history as an international event grew in the 1990s when many of the best players and teams in the world travelled to Uruguay for the Punta Sevens.[7]

International 7s and World Series: 1993 to 2001[edit]

The inaugural Punta del Este International Sevens tournament in 1993 attracted teams from Australia, France, England and New Zealand, as well as neighbours Argentina and Paraguay, plus Uruguay itself as host. The final was won by New Zealand, defeating Australia in a closely fought match by 26–19.[8] Other national teams including Fiji, Tonga and Samoa were added to the field in subsequent years as the tournament grew in status. Punta del Este was included as a stop on the 1999–2000 World Sevens Series but was dropped from the tour after the inaugural season. After one further event in 2001, won by Argentina who defeated New Zealand by 26–21 in the final,[9] the international sevens at Punta del Este ceased.[10]

Season Venue Cup final Placings Refs
International 7s Winner Score Runner-up Plate Bowl
I – IV For club & invitational 1989 to 1992 — See Punta del Este Sevens § Early years
V 1993 Estadio Domingo Burgueño
All Blacks​ VII
26–19
Australia
Argentina
Buenos Aires
Argentina
Cuyo
[8]
[11]
VI 1994 Estadio Domingo Burgueño
Fiji Cavaliers
35–12
New Zealand
Argentina
Rosario
France
Cote d'Aquitaine
[12]
[13]
VII 1995 Estadio Ginés Cairo Medina [14]
Argentina
36–19 Australia
Aus Barbarians
 FIRA [a]
Tonga
[14]
[15]
[16]
VIII 1996 Estadio Domingo Burgueño
New Zealand
31–26
France
Argentina
Buenos Aires
Uruguay
Old Boys
[17]
IX 1997RWC Qual. Estadio Domingo Burgueño
France
35–14
Western Samoa

Argentina

Uruguay
[18]
X 1998 Estadio Domingo Burgueño
New Zealand
42–19
Fiji

Western Samoa
? [19]
XI 1999 Estadio Domingo Burgueño
New Zealand
38–44
Argentina

Western Samoa
n/a [20]
XII 2000 Estadio Domingo Burgueño
New Zealand
42–19
Fiji

Australia

France
[21]
XIII 2001 Estadio Domingo Burgueño
Argentina VII
26–21
New Zealand VII

Uruguay
 Uruguay[b]
Paysandú
[9]
[22]

Key:
 Dark blue line indicates a tournament included in the World Rugby Sevens Series.

Select teams event: 2005 onward[edit]

After the tournament was restarted as a tournament for club teams in 2003, some national and invitational sides began to be attracted back to play against the clubs, and occasionally a parallel international tournament was included again at the Punta del Este Sevens. The first was an IRB satellite competition in 2005 which included several national teams.[23] In 2012, an all-selection tournament for national and invitational teams was played, with Argentina defeating South Africa's academy to win the final.[24] Since 2017, Punta del Este has been included on the annual Sudamérica Rugby Sevens series, and contested by selected international teams.

Season Venue Cup final Placings Refs
Winner Score Runner-up Third Fourth
XVI 2005
(IRB)
Estadio Domingo Burgueño
Argentina
38–14  Argentina[c]
Moby Dick

Uruguay
 Argentina[d]
BFL Mercosur
[25]
[23]
[26]
XVII

XXII
For club & invitational 2005 to 2011 — See Punta del Este Sevens § Gold Cup
XXIII 2012 Estadio Domingo Burgueño  Argentina[e]
Argentina VII
22–5
SA 7s Academy

Uruguay

Chile
[24]
[27]
XXIV

XXVII
For club & invitational 2013 to 2016 — See Punta del Este Sevens § Gold Cup
XXVIII 2017 Estadio Domingo Burgueño
Argentina
22–21
Fiji

Chile

USA Falcons
[28]
[29]
XXIX 2018 Estadio Domingo Burgueño
SA 7s Academy
21−5
Chile

France

Uruguay
[30]
XXX 2019 Estadio Domingo Burgueño
Chile
7–5 Argentina
Argentina VII

Portugal

Germany
[31]

Key:
 Light blue line indicates a tournament included in the Sudamérica Rugby Sevens series.

Club and invitational tournament[edit]

Early years: 1989 to 1992[edit]

The first four tournaments featured mainly South American club teams although host club Old Boys organised an invitational team known as "Anzacs Old Boys" which won the Cup in 1991 and 1992.[7] That team featured notable players from Australia and New Zealand, including John Eales, Jason Little, Eric Rush and Frank Bunce alongside players such as South American representative Gabriel Travaglini.[32][33] In 1993 the tournament became the Punta del Este International Sevens and featured selected national teams from around the world.

Season Venue Cup final Refs
Club & Invitational Winner Runner-up
I 1989 Estadio Domingo Burgueño Uruguay
Old Boys
Argentina
Banco Nación
[7]
II 1990 Estadio Domingo Burgueño Argentina
Los Tilos
Argentina
Pueyrredón
[7]
III 1991 Estadio Domingo Burgueño Anzacs Old Boys Argentina
Los Tilos
[7]
IV 1992 Estadio Domingo Burgueño Anzacs Old Boys Argentina
Pueyrredón
[7]

Gold Cup: 2003 to present[edit]

PSG (Pucaru) player chases the ball, 7 Punta 2010.

Following a one year hiatus after the international sevens had ended in 2001, the event was restarted in 2003 as a tournament for club teams in a return to roots.[7] For the fourteen seasons from 2003 to 2016, the tournament was contested mainly by club teams, but with the occasional national representative selections and sponsored invitational teams [10] entered in the same division.[7] Since 2017, club teams have competed in a separate division to international selections.

A Gold Cup is awarded to the champion team. Silver and Bronze Cups were usually awarded to teams winning the lower bracket playoffs,[f] although the minor placings in the top bracket were given recognition in 2017.

Season Venue Gold Cup Placings Refs
Club & invitational Winner Score Runner-up Silver Cup Bronze Cup
No tournament in 2002
XIV 2003 Estadio Domingo Burgueño Uruguay
Old Boys
13–7 Uruguay
Old Christians
Argentina
La Tablada
Uruguay
 Pucaru [es]
[34]
[35]
[36]
XV 2004 Estadio Domingo Burgueño Argentina
Hindú
22–19 Argentina
La Ballena [c]
Argentina
Marista Mendoza

Uruguay
[37]
[38]
[39]
XVI 2005 Estadio Domingo Burgueño Argentina
Alumni
27–14 Argentina
Hindú
Uruguay
Old Christians
n/a [40]
[41]
XVII 2006 Estadio Domingo Burgueño Argentina
Moby Dick
24–5 Argentina
Jockey de Salta
Uruguay
Old Christians
Uruguay
 Pucaru [es]
[42]
[43]
XVIII 2007 Estadio Domingo Burgueño Argentina
San Isidro CASI
26–17 Argentina
Moby Dick
Argentina
Hindú
Argentina
San Isidro SIC
[44]
XIX 2008 Estadio Domingo Burgueño
Samoa
25–0 Argentina
Buenos Aires

Tonga
Argentina
Jockey de Salta
[45]
XX 2009 Estadio Domingo Burgueño
Samoa
34–14
Argentina

Tonga
Argentina
Los Tordos
[46]
[47]
XXI 2010 Estadio Domingo Burgueño Argentina
Buenos Aires
17–12
Samoa

Tonga
Bridgestone VII [48]
[49]
XXII 2011 Estadio Domingo Burgueño Argentina
Buenos Aires
19–10 Argentina
Salta [es]
Argentina
Córdoba Athletic
Argentina
Moby Dick
[50]
XXIII 2012 Estadio Domingo Burgueño  Argentina[g]
Personal VII
19–10 Argentina
Moby Dick
Argentina
Buenos Aires
Uruguay
Paysandú Clubs
[24]
XXIV 2013 Estadio Domingo Burgueño Argentina
Buenos Aires
39–0 Argentina
Moby Dick

Uruguay
Argentina
Jockey de Salta
[51]
XXV 2014 Estadio Domingo Burgueño
SA 7s Academy
19–14 Argentina
Moby Dick

Uruguay VII
Argentina
Pucará
[52]
XXVI 2014–15 Punta del Este Polo & Country Club Argentina
Moby Dick
15–7
Chile

Uruguay
Argentina
Pucará
[53]
XXVII 2015–16 Punta del Este Polo & Country Club Argentina
Córdoba Athletic
21–5 Argentina
Moby Dick
Argentina
Pucará
Argentina
Liceo Naval
[54]
[55]
Club & Invitational Winner Score Runner-up Third Fourth
XXVIII 2017 Estadio Domingo Burgueño Argentina
Córdoba Athletic
28–7 Argentina
La Tablada
Uruguay
Trébol
Uruguay
Carrasco Polo
[56]
[57]
XXIX No club competition in 2018
XXX 2019 Estadio Domingo Burgueño Argentina
 CURNE[h]
17–12 Uruguay
Old Boys
Argentina
La Tablada
Uruguay
Trébol
[31]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Fédération Internationale de Rugby Amateur selection from France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Holland, Morocco, Tunisia.[15]
  2. ^ Recorded as Paysandú (possibly a regional selection) by Rugby7,[22] in other sources as Trébol de Paysandú[es].[9]
  3. ^ a b La Ballena Moby Dick: a composite team mainly from Argentina,[23] under the banner of local Punta bar, Moby Dick.[10]
  4. ^ BFL Mercosur: a sponsored invitational team of players selected from Argentina and France.[23]
  5. ^ UAR 7s (Argentina VII)
  6. ^ Gold, Silver and Bronze cups are the nominal trophies for many rugby sevens tournaments in South America. These are generally equivalent to the Cup, Plate and Bowl – for first, fifth and ninth place, respectively – as awarded in the traditional sevens tournament with sixteen teams. For an event with a different number of teams or divisions, however, these trophies may awarded differently.
  7. ^ Personal VII: an invitational team sponsored by mobile phone company Telecom Personal.
  8. ^ A university rugby club based in the city of Resistencia in north-eastern Argentina.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bath, pp 6, 78
  2. ^ Atlantis: US Sevens Rugby: A Summary and History, retrieved, 10 December 2009
  3. ^ West Indies Sevens Changes Archived 2011-07-15 at the Wayback Machine on Rugby Bahamas, published 14 March 2009, retrieved, 10 December 2009
  4. ^ Bath, p 78
  5. ^ NZ wins Uruguay sevens in The Press (Christchurch, New Zealand), published 7 January 1999
  6. ^ The Development of Rugby in the River Plate Region: Irish Influences - Hugh FitzGerald Ryan, part four, retrieved, 10 December 2009
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h "Punta del Este Roll of Honour". rugby7.com. Retrieved 24 December 2018.
  8. ^ a b Annual Report (PDF) (Report) (in Spanish). Unión Argentina de Rugby. 1993. pp. 36–38. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 September 2018.
  9. ^ a b c Mamone, Pablo (7 January 2001). "Shadow Argentina take Punta del Este Sevens". ESPN Scrum.
  10. ^ a b c Degas, Frankie (27 December 2009). "Rugby in paradise - Seven de Punta del Este". Ultimate Rugby 7s. Archived from the original on 9 November 2013.
  11. ^ "Success at sevens". The Canberra Times. 14 January 1993. p. 21. Retrieved 24 December 2018.
  12. ^ Annual Report (PDF) (Report) (in Spanish). Unión Argentina de Rugby. 1994. pp. 32–33. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 September 2018.
  13. ^ Gutierrez, Jose. "La Historia de un Torneo de Rugby que es más que un Mero Torneo". La Semana Activa (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 25 December 2018.
  14. ^ a b Annual Report (PDF) (Report) (in Spanish). Unión Argentina de Rugby. 1995. pp. 19–20. Archived from the original (PDF) on 23 June 2017.
  15. ^ a b Signes, Emil (24 July 2013). "January 7-8, 1995: Atlantis at Punta del Este Sevens (Uruguay)". Emilito. Archived from the original on 25 December 2018.
  16. ^ Signes, Emil (10 March 1995). "Argentina win Punta del Este 7s" (PDF). Rugby: 14 15. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 December 2018.
  17. ^ Signes, Emil (18 March 1996). "Punte del Este 7s NZ Over France in OT". Rugby Magazine: 18. Archived from the original on 25 December 2018.
  18. ^ 1997 Punta del Este 7s Rugby 7s.
  19. ^ 1998 Punta del Este 7s Rugby 7s.
  20. ^ "National teams results". 7 Punta. 1999. Archived from the original on 11 November 1999. Retrieved 24 December 2018.
  21. ^ 2000 Punta del Este 7s Rugby 7s.
  22. ^ a b 2001 Punta del Este 7s Rugby 7s.
  23. ^ a b c d "Argentina ganó la Copa de Oro del "Seven a Side" en Uruguay". La Nación (in Spanish). 10 January 2005. Archived from the original on 27 December 2018.
  24. ^ a b c "Pasó el Seven de Punta". Montevideo Cricket Club (in Spanish). 12 January 2013. Archived from the original on 27 December 2018.
  25. ^ "Rugby: Chile derrota a Colombia en Seven a Side de Punta del Este". Emol (in Spanish). 9 January 2005. Archived from the original on 27 December 2018.
  26. ^ 2005 Punta del Este 7s Rugby 7s.
  27. ^ 2012 Punta del Este 7s Rugby 7s.
  28. ^ Argentina y Fiji, los mejores en el arranque del #SudaméricaRugby7s (in Spanish) Sudamerica Rugby. 7 January 2017.
  29. ^ "Argentina, primer campeón del #SudaméricaRugby7s". Sudamerica Rugby (in Spanish). 7 January 2017. Archived from the original on 8 January 2017. Retrieved 24 December 2018.
  30. ^ 2018 Punta del Este 7s Rugby 7s.
  31. ^ a b "Chile se consagró en el Seven de Punta del Este". ESPN (in Spanish). 7 January 2019. Archived from the original on 11 January 2019.
  32. ^ "Uruguay invitation". The Canberra Times. 11 December 1991. Retrieved 24 December 2018.
  33. ^ "100 Years: The British Schools Old Boys and Old Girls Club" (in Spanish). 2014. p. 146.
  34. ^ Tabeira, Martín (6 January 2003). "En clásico oriental Old Boys se quedó con el Seven". Puntaweb (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 21 November 2004. Retrieved 27 December 2018.
  35. ^ Tabeira, Martín (5 January 2003). "El Seven regresó con todo". Puntaweb (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 21 November 2004. Retrieved 27 December 2018.
  36. ^ "El seven a side vuelve a Punta del Este". LeRed21 (in Spanish). 3 January 2003. Archived from the original on 27 December 2018.
  37. ^ Tabeira, Martín. "Hindú se quedó con el XV Seven de Punta del Este". Puntaweb (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 27 December 2018.
  38. ^ "Hindú se consagro campeón del Seven de Punta del Este 2004". Cordoba XV (in Spanish). 7 January 2004. Archived from the original on 27 December 2018.
  39. ^ Holden, L:ian (6 January 2004). "Hindú, el mejor de todos". Rugbyfun. Archived from the original on 27 December 2018.
  40. ^ "Un rugido estremeció la noche puntaesteña". Puntaweb (in Spanish). 10 January 2005. Archived from the original on 27 December 2018.
  41. ^ "Los Pumas se quedaron con el seven de Punta del Este" (in Spanish). 10 January 2005. Archived from the original on 27 December 2018.
  42. ^ "A los salteños solamente les faltó el final". Clarin (in Spanish). 9 January 2006. Archived from the original on 27 December 2018.
  43. ^ "Los que siguen en el Seven uruguayo". ESPN (in Spanish). 8 January 2006. Archived from the original on 27 December 2018.
  44. ^ "En el Este, CASI campeón". Super Try (in Spanish). 14 January 2007. Archived from the original on 20 June 2015.
  45. ^ "Samoa festejó en el seven de Punta del Este". infobae (in Spanish). 6 January 2008. Archived from the original on 25 December 2018.
  46. ^ "Samoa vence a Argentina y conquista Seven a Side de Rugby" (in Spanish). 4 January 2009. Archived from the original on 25 December 2018.
  47. ^ 2009 Punta del Este 7s Rugby 7s.
  48. ^ "Buenos Aires festejó en el Seven de Punta del Este". La Nacion (in Spanish). 5 January 2010. Archived from the original on 25 December 2018. Retrieved 25 December 2018.
  49. ^ 2010 Punta del Este 7s Rugby 7s.
  50. ^ 2011 Punta del Este 7s Rugby 7s.
  51. ^ Matches (in Spanish) 7 Punta. 2013.
  52. ^ Matches (in Spanish) 7 Punta. 2014.
  53. ^ Moby Dick Champion Punta del Este Sevens! Archived 2016-01-29 at the Wayback Machine (in Spanish) Rugby Time. 28 December 2014.
  54. ^ "XXVII Seven Punta 2015 Friday". Old Boys. 26 December 2015. Retrieved 24 December 2018.
  55. ^ "XXVII Seven Punta 2015 Saturday". Old Boys. 27 December 2015. Retrieved 24 December 2018.
  56. ^ "Se define el Seven de Punta del Este: Resultados del viernes". Ovación. 7 January 2017. Retrieved 24 December 2018.
  57. ^ "Argentina, el gran campeón del Seven: Los resultados del sábado". Ovación (in Spanish). 8 January 2017. Retrieved 24 December 2018.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Bath, Richard (ed.) The Complete Book of Rugby (Seven Oaks Ltd, 1997 ISBN 1-86200-013-1)

External links[edit]