Québécois people

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"Quebecers" redirects here. For the professional wrestling tag team, see The Quebecers.
Quebecers
French: Québécois
Total population
~15,000,000
Regions with significant populations
 Canada 11,879,715
      Québec 8,326,100
      Ontario 1,700,000
      Alberta 396,230
      New Brunswick 233,530
 United States 2,100,840
 France 60,000
      Saint Pierre and Miquelon 4,650
 United Kingdom 20,000
  Switzerland 5,243
 Belgium 4,145
 Cuba 2,140
 Algeria 1,500
 Russia 520
Languages
French (Official, Majority) · English (Minority)
Religion
Roman Catholicism · Protestantism · Others

Quebecers or Quebeckers[1][2][3] (French: Québécois) are terms that are sometimes used to refer to people living in the province of Quebec in Canada,[4] though such is not the only definition of Québécois. This identification can be used by some Francophone people of Quebec to refer to themselves.[5]

A majority in the Canadian House of Commons in 2006 approved a motion tabled by Prime Minister Stephen Harper, which stated that the Québécois are a nation within a united Canada.[6] Harper later elaborated that the motion's definition of Québécois relies on personal decisions to self-identify as Québécois, and therefore is a personal choice.[7] Self-identification as Québécois became dominant in the 1960s; prior to this, the Francophone people of Quebec identified themselves as French Canadians.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Quebec's voters will decide tuition conflict; Education Minister Michelle Courchesne (with video)". [dead link]
  2. ^ Andy Radia (1 August 2012). "It's official: Quebecers are going to the polls September 4". Retrieved 2014-06-18. 
  3. ^ "With Canada's four medals all won by Quebeckers, Parti Quebecois leader says province could shine as independent country". The Globe and Mail. Toronto. 2012-07-31. 
  4. ^ Michael M. Brescia, John C. Super. North America: an introduction. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: University of Toronto Press, 2009. Pp. 72.
  5. ^ Berch Berberoglu. The national question: nationalism, ethnic conflict, and self-determination in the 20th century. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA: Temple University Press, 2995. Pp. 208.
  6. ^ Michael M. Brescia, John C. Super. North America: an introduction. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: University of Toronto Press, 2009. Pp. 72.
  7. ^ "Who's a Québécois? Harper isn't sure". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 2006-12-19. Archived from the original on 2007-01-26. Retrieved 2014-06-18. 
  8. ^ Berch Berberoglu. And they still do to this day The national question: nationalism, ethnic conflict, and self-determination in the 20th century. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA: Temple University Press, 2995. Pp. 208.