Radio code

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Radio code is a colloquial term that refers to any code that is commonly used over a telecommunication system.

Brevity code[edit]

Brevity codes are designed to convey complex information with a few words or codes. Specific brevity codes include:

Operating signals[edit]

Brevity codes that are specifically designed to be used between communications operators and to support communication operations are referred to as "operating signals". These include:

  • Prosigns for Morse code
  • 92 Code, Western Union telegraph brevity codes
  • Q code, initially developed for commercial radiotelegraph communication, and later adopted by other radio services, especially amateur radio. Used since circa 1909.
  • QN Signals, published by the ARRL and used by Amateur radio operators to assist in the transmission of ARRL Radiograms in the National Traffic System.
  • R code, published by the British Post Office in 1908 for use only by British coastal wireless stations and ships licensed by the Postmaster General.[1]
  • S code, published by the British Post Office in 1908 for use only by British coastal wireless stations and ships licensed by the Postmaster General.[1]
  • X code, used by European military services as a wireless telegraphy code in the 1930s and 1940s
  • Z code, also used in the early days of radiotelegraph communication.

Other[edit]

Morse code, is commonly used in Amateur radio. Morse code abbreviations are a type of brevity code. Procedure words used in radiotelephony procedure, are a type of radio code. Spelling alphabets, including the ICAO spelling alphabet, are commonly used in communication over radios and telephones.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "R - CODES AND S - CODES".