Raees Ahmadzai

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Raees Ahmadzai
Ahmadzai.jpg
Personal information
Full name Raees Khan Ahmadzai
Born (1984-09-03) 3 September 1984 (age 32)
Logar Province, Afghanistan
Batting style Right-handed
Bowling style Right-arm off break
International information
National side
ODI debut (cap 10) 19 April 2009 v Scotland
Last ODI 18 February 2010 v Canada
ODI shirt no. 33
T20I debut (cap 8) 1 February 2010 v Ireland
Last T20I 5 May 2010 v South Africa
T20I shirt no. 33
Domestic team information
Years Team
2007 Sebastianites Cricket and Athletic Club
Career statistics
Competition ODI T20I FC LA
Matches 5 8 3 16
Runs scored 88 91 90 283
Batting average 29.33 30.33 18.00 25.72
100s/50s –/– –/– –/– –/1
Top score 39 33* 27 50*
Balls bowled 24 36 150
Wickets 1
Bowling average 107.00
5 wickets in innings
10 wickets in match
Best bowling 1/37
Catches/stumpings 2/– 2/– 1/– 6/–
Source: Cricinfo, 19 May 2010

Raees Khan Ahmadzai (born 3 September 1984)[citation needed] is a former Afghan cricketer who represented the Afghanistan national cricket team until his retirement in May 2010. Ahmadzai is a right-handed batsman who bowls right-arm off break. He is also UNICEF National Goodwill Ambassador.[1]

Early and personal life[edit]

Ahmadzai was born in the village of Azra, Logar Province, Afghanistan. He is from the Kuchi tribe, along with former teammates Mohammad Nabi and Dawlat Ahmadzai.[2] He is far from certain about his age. In an interview in Potchefstroom with Will Luke in April 2009, he said, "Talking to my mother, she works out my age by seeing who the president was. Unofficially I'm nearly 25, give or take three years. Or four. I could be 21 or 28." Luke's own opinion, going by "Deep-set wrinkles and a calm demeanour", was twenty-eight.[3] The general consensus from Cricinfo and CricketArchive is that he was born on 3 September 1984.

Ahmadzai spent much of his early years in refugee camps with his family, fleeing from the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and the subsequent Civil War that followed the Soviet withdrawal. Ahmadzai, like many of his teammates learnt the game in neighbouring Pakistan, in Ahmadzai's case in a Peshawar schoolyard.[4]

Career[edit]

Ahmadzai made his debut for Afghanistan against Rahim Yar Khan in the 2002/3 Cornelius Trophy. Ahmadzai made his international debut for Afghanistan against Hong Kong in the 2004 ACC Trophy. Ahmadzai represented Afghanistan in the following tournament in 2006. During the 2006 tournament, Ahmadzai captained the side.

In 2007, Ahmadzai played two List-A matches for the Sebastianites Cricket and Athletic Club in Sri Lanka, playing matches against Lankan Cricket Club[5] and the Sri Lanka Army Sports Club.[6]

Ahmadzai was part of the rapidly rising Afghan team that from 2008 to 2009 won the World Cricket League Division Five, Division Four and Division Three, thus promoting them to Division Two and allowing them to partake in the 2009 ICC World Cup Qualifier.

During the qualifier, Ahmadzai made his List-A debut for Afghanistan against Denmark.[7] During the same tournament Afghanistan gained ODI status, with Ahmadzai making his One Day International debut against Scotland, where he scored 39 runs, helping Afghanistan to an 89 run victory.

Ahmadzai made his first class debut in the Intercontinental Cup against a Zimbabwe XI in which Afghanistan drew the match. Later, in November 2009 he was a member of Afghanistan's 2009 ACC Twenty20 Cup winning squad.

Ahmadzai made his full Twenty20 International debut against Ireland in the 2010 Quadrangular Twenty20 Series in Sri Lanka. Later on in February 2010, Ahmadzai was a key member of Afghanistan's victorious 2010 ICC World Twenty20 Qualifier winning squad and was later named in Afghanistan's squad for the 2010 ICC World Twenty20.[8]

In April 2010, Ahmadzai was a key member of Afghanistan's 2010 ACC Trophy Elite winning squad which defeated Nepal in the final, with Ahmadzai scoring 52 runs in Afghanistan's innings; earning him the man of the match award.[9] Ahmadzai played in both of Afghanistan's matches in Group C of the 2010 ICC World Twenty20. In their first match of the tournament he remained unbeaten on 5 against India[10] and against South Africa he was caught behind by Mark Boucher off the bowling of Morné Morkel.[11] Afghanistan lost both matches and were eliminated from the tournament.

Retirement[edit]

Shortly before Afghanistan's match against South Africa, Ahmadzai announced he would retire following the match. He stated his reason for retiring being "in order to focus on developing the younger generation of Afghan cricketers".[12] Ahmadzai has now taken up a coaching role with the national squad as well a chief selector for the Afghanistan Cricket Board. He is also a representative of Afghanaid.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://ahmadfaisalsidiqi.blogspot.com/2011/09/unicef-afghanistan-announces-first.html?spref=fb
  2. ^ "Raees Ahmadzai Blog, CricketEurope". Cricketeurope4.net. 23 August 2010. Retrieved 13 September 2010. 
  3. ^ Luke, Will, Cloth for balls, shoes for stumps." Cricinfo, 6 April 2009
  4. ^ Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty article mentioning Ahmadzai
  5. ^ "Sebastianites Cricket and Athletic Club v Lankan Cricket Club (2007)". Cricketarchive.com. 14 November 2007. Retrieved 13 September 2010. 
  6. ^ "Sebastianites Cricket and Athletic Club v Sri Lanka Army Sports Club (2007)". Cricketarchive.com. 17 November 2007. Retrieved 13 September 2010. 
  7. ^ "Afghanistan v Denmark (2009)". Cricketarchive.com. 1 April 2009. Retrieved 13 September 2010. 
  8. ^ "ICC World Twenty20 Afghanistan squad". Cricinfo.com. Retrieved 13 September 2010. 
  9. ^ "Afghanistan v Nepal (2010)". Cricketarchive.com. 9 April 2010. Retrieved 13 September 2010. 
  10. ^ "Afghanistan v India, ICC World Twenty20 2010 (Group C)". Cricketarchive.com. 1 May 2010. Retrieved 13 September 2010. 
  11. ^ "Afghanistan v South Africa, ICC World Twenty20 2010 (Group C)". Cricketarchive.com. 5 May 2010. Retrieved 13 September 2010. 
  12. ^ "Raees Ahmadzai announces retirement". Cricinfo.com. Retrieved 13 September 2010. 

External links[edit]