Raymond E. Goedert

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Raymond Emil Goedert
Auxiliary Bishop Emeritus of Chicago
Titular Bishop of Tamazeni
ArchdioceseChicago
AppointedJuly 8, 1991
InstalledAugust 29, 1991
Term endedJanuary 24, 2003
Other postsTitular Bishop of Tamazeni
Orders
OrdinationMay 1, 1952
by Samuel Stritch
ConsecrationAugust 29, 1991
by Joseph Bernardin, Alfred Leo Abramowicz, and John R. Gorman
Personal details
Born (1927-10-15) October 15, 1927 (age 92)
Oak Park, Illinois
Styles of
Raymond Emil Goedert
Mitre (plain).svg
Reference style
Spoken styleYour Excellency
Religious styleBishop

Raymond Emil Goedert (born October 15, 1927) is an American retired prelate of the Roman Catholic Church who served as an auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of Chicago, Illinois and titular bishop of Tamazeni. He served from 1991 to 2003.

Biography[edit]

Born in Oak Park, Illinois, Goedert was ordained to the priesthood on May 1, 1952.

He knew of 25 priest molesting children and did not report it to the police.[1]

On July 8, 1991, he was appointed a bishop and was consecrated by Joseph Cardinal Bernardin, then the Archbishop of Chicago, on August 29, 1991.

In 1998, Goedert was one of 75 U.S. Catholic Bishops to condemn the U.S. policy on strategic nuclear weapons[2].

Bishop Goedert retired on January 24, 2003.[3]

He was Vicar General under Cardinal Bernardin, and lived with Cardinal Francis George in the Archbishop's Mansion during his entire ministry. He was with both men when they died, and gave last rites to Cardinal George.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://chicago.suntimes.com/news/chicago-catholic-bishop-raymond-goedert-didnt-report-priest-child-sex-abuse-living-cardinal-blase-cupich-mansion-vincent-mccaffrey-religion
  2. ^ "75 U.S. Catholic Bishops Condemn Policy of Nuclear Detterence". www.ccnr.org. Retrieved 2018-11-20.
  3. ^ Bishop Raymond Goedert

External links[edit]

Episcopal succession[edit]

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Auxiliary Bishop Emeritus of Chicago
2003–Present
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Auxiliary Bishop of Chicago
1991–2003
Succeeded by