Robert Goolrick

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Robert Goolrick
Born 1948
Virginia
Nationality American
Genre novels, memoir

Robert Goolrick (born 1948 in Virginia) is an American writer whose first novel sold more than five million copies.[1].

Biography[edit]

Robert Goolrick grew up in the 1950s in the small college town of Lexington, Virginia. His father was a college professor. His mother was a homemaker and he had two siblings. When Goolrick lost his job as an advertising copywriter, he turned to memoir writing.[2] He wrote a memoir and his parents disinherited him, so he moved to New York.[3] "The End of the World As We Know It: Scenes from a Life" spotlighted "the excesses and failures of both the social underpinnings of the time and his parents' inevitable alcohol-fueled decline, culminating in a devastating portrayal of the sexual abuse he suffered as a child." He sought "something resembling peace" in his writing.[4] After years living in New York City, he returned to Virginia.[5] In 2015 he moved from Whitestone, Virginia to Weems, Virginia.[6] He reads from his book "A Reliable Wife" in a video posted for his Facebook followers to which he added, "For people who can't come to a bookstore, this is what I look like and what I sound like, thanks to my friend Ashraf Meer."[7]

Works[edit]

  • 2007: The End of the World as We Know It: Scenes from a Life, Algonquin Books, ISBN 978-1565124813
  • 2009: A Reliable Wife, Algonquin Books, ISBN 978-1565125964
  • 2012: Heading Out to Wonderful, Algonquin Books, ISBN 978-1565129238
  • 2015: The Fall of Princes, Algonquin Books, ISBN 978-1616204204
  • 2018: The Dying of the Light, Harper, ISBN 978-0062678225

Works translated into French[edit]

  • 2009: Une femme simple et honnête, [« A Reliable Wife »], translation by Marie de Prémonville, Paris, Éditions Anne Carrière, 413 p. ISBN 978-2-84337-542-2
  • 2010: Féroces, [« The End of the World as We Know It: Scenes from a Life »], translated by Marie de Prémonville, Éditions Anne Carrière (fr), 254 p. ISBN 978-2-8433-7579-8.[8]
  • 2012: Arrive un vagabond, [« Heading Out to Wonderful »], translation by Marie de Prémonville, Éditions Anne Carrière, 319 p. ISBN 978-2-84337-681-8
- Prix Laurent-Bonelli Virgin-Lire 2012
- Grand prix des lectrices de Elle 2013.[9]
  • 2014: La Chute des princes [« The Fall of Princes »], translation by Marie de Prémonville, Éditions Anne Carrière, 360 p. ISBN 978-2-8433-7737-2.[10]
  • 2017: Après l’incendie, followed by the short story Trois lamentations, Éditions Anne Carrière, 300 p. ISBN 978-2-84337-828-7

Book recommendations by Goolrick for children[edit]

Robert Goolrick listed his six favorite books for children: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain; Oh, the Places You'll Go! by Dr. Seuss; Canada by Richard Ford; The Patrick Melrose Novels by Edward St. Aubyn; The Family Fang by Kevin Wilson; and Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris.[11]

Prizes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Robert Goolrick | Bookreporter.com". www.bookreporter.com. Retrieved 3 November 2016.
  2. ^ "Robert Goolrick". www.goodreads.com. Retrieved 26 January 2018.
  3. ^ Forest, Epping. "Biography". www.eppingforestantiques.com. Retrieved 3 November 2016.
  4. ^ "Robert Goolrick, author of the best-seller A Reliable Wife, talks about writing as the path to something resembling peace". Nashville Scene. Retrieved 3 November 2016.
  5. ^ "Shelf Awareness for Readers for Friday, June 15, 2012". www.shelf-awareness.com. Retrieved 3 November 2016.
  6. ^ "Robert Goolrick | Kirkus Reviews". Kirkus Reviews. Retrieved 3 November 2016.
  7. ^ "Robert Goolrick". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 27 January 2018.
  8. ^ André Clavel (Lire). "L'autobiographie de Robert Goolrick". Retrieved 20 January 2017.
  9. ^ Claire Julliard. "Robert Goolrick, c'est good". Retrieved 20 January 2017.
  10. ^ ""La chute des princes" de Robert Goolrick: Icare au royaume du dollar". Retrieved 20 January 2017.
  11. ^ "Robert Goolrick's 6 favorite books about childhood". Retrieved 3 November 2016.

External links[edit]