Rupert Degas

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Rupert Degas
Rupert Degas Brightonimicon.jpg
Degas in 2008
Born
Rupert Joel Degas

(1970-08-17) 17 August 1970 (age 49)
NationalityBritish, Australian
OccupationActor, voice actor, impressionist
Years active1985–present
Websitehttp://rupertdegas.com

Rupert Joel Degas (born 17 August 1970) is a British/Australian actor,[1] best known for his voice work in animation and audiobooks.[2] Since the 1980s, he has worked in film and television, theater, video games, radio productions and podcasts, audiobooks and as a producer.

Early life and education[edit]

Degas was born in London, to film and TV screenwriter Brian Degas and radio and television presenter Maggie Clews. He was educated at Hill House School in Knightsbridge and Emanuel School in Wandsworth.

Career[edit]

Animation[edit]

Best known as the voice of Scrambler in Bob the Builder [3] from 2002-2011, Degas has lent his voice to a string of cartoons such as Chop Socky Chooks [4], Robotboy [5], Thomas & Friends [6] and The Amazing World of Gumball [7]. He also played several characters in the animated feature film Planet 51 [8]. Since moving to Australia, Degas has provided voices for The Wild Adventures of Blinky Bill [9], Kitty Is Not A Cat [10], The Strange Chores [11] and Maya the Bee: The Honey Games [12]

Audiobook narration[edit]

Degas has narrated over 250 audiobooks including A Possible Life by Sebastian Faulks which The Times reviewed as "exceptionally well read".[13] He has received particular critical acclaim for his performances of The Name of the Wind and The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss [14] [15] [16], and Skulduggery Pleasant by Derek Landy [17]. Degas says of audiobooks, "I do accents. It's my specialty."[18] The Guardian called his voice performances "shape-shifting".[19]

Film and television[edit]

Degas's first film appearance was in Jerry Schatzberg's Reunion [20], followed by TV appearances in Dead Romantic [21], Over Here [22], A Touch of Frost [23] and Passport to Murder [24]. Other notable film and TV appearances include Holby City [25], Love Soup [26], Shoot the Messenger [27], Nathan Barley [28] and Red Dwarf.[29]

Theatre[edit]

Having been a regular Newsrevue performer at the Canal Café Theatre and at the Edinburgh Fringe, Degas made his West End theatre debut in Stones in His Pockets [30] at The Duke of York's Theatre and the New Ambassadors Theatre [31] followed by The 39 Steps [32] [33] at The Criterion Theatre in London's Piccadilly Circus.

Video game voices[edit]

Radio and podcasts[edit]

On radio, Degas has performed in over eighty plays and series, most notably BBC productions of The Brightonomicon [34], Dirk Gently [35][36] and The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy [37]. He also played Pantalaimon in the full cast audio production of His Dark Materials [38].

Awards and honours[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cavendish, Dominic (23 July 2003). "Cash Cow With a Rare Kick". London: telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved 5 December 2010.
  2. ^ Bremner, Charles; Robertson, David. "The Essential Kipling". London: entertainment.timesonline.co.uk. Archived from the original on 15 June 2011. Retrieved 5 December 2010.
  3. ^ "IMDb". Bob the Builder. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  4. ^ "Behind the Voice Actors". Chop Socky Chooks. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  5. ^ Emily Ashby. "Common Sense media". Robotboy. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  6. ^ Elliot Killick-Ward (10 July 2015). "Sodor Island". Thomas & friends. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  7. ^ "Voice Chasers". The Amazing World of Gumball. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  8. ^ "Voice Chasers". Planet 51. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  9. ^ "TV Guide". The Wild Adventures of Blinky Bill. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  10. ^ "Screen Australia". Kitty Is Not a Cat. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  11. ^ "Australian Television". The Strange Chores. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  12. ^ "imdb". Maya the Bee: The Honey Games. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  13. ^ Christina Hardyment (13 October 2012). "Audiobook: Possible Life by Sebastian Faulks". The Times. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  14. ^ "The Times". The Name of the Wind. 26 May 2012. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  15. ^ "Good Reads". The Name of the Wind. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  16. ^ Amanda (1 September 2019). "Winter Is Coming". ???. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  17. ^ Robin Whitten (11 December 2008). "AudioFile". Skulduggery Pleasant. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  18. ^ a b Robin F. Whitten. "Spotlight: Rupert Degas". AudioFile. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  19. ^ Brian Logan (23 September 2006). "The 39 Steps". The Guardian. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  20. ^ Derek Winnert (14 March 2018). "Classic Movie Review". Reunion. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  21. ^ BBC Genome (14 February 1993). "BBC". Dead Romantic. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  22. ^ "British Comedy Guide". Over Here. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  23. ^ "epguides.com". A Touch of Frost. 25 October 2018. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  24. ^ Tony Scott (4 March 1993). "Variety". Passport to Murder. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  25. ^ "epguides.com". Holby City. 25 October 2018. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  26. ^ "British Comedy Guide". Love Soup. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  27. ^ "BFI". Shoot the Messenger. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  28. ^ "listal.com". Nathan Barley. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  29. ^ "British Comedy Guide". Red Dwarf. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  30. ^ "London Theatre". Stones in His Pockets. 23 September 2002. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  31. ^ Dominic Cavendish (23 July 2003). "The Telegraph". Stones in His Pockets. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  32. ^ Brian Logan (23 September 2006). "The Guardian". The 39 Steps. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  33. ^ Ernio Hernandez (19 April 2007). "Playbill". The 39 Steps. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  34. ^ "British Comedy Guide". The Brightonomicon. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  35. ^ "BBC". Dirk Gently. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  36. ^ "British Comedy Guide". Dirk Gently. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  37. ^ "BBC". The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  38. ^ "Bridge to the Stars". His Dark Materials. Retrieved 20 January 2020.
  39. ^ "Rupert Degas at AudioFile". AudioFile. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  40. ^ "Past Winners". Odyssey Award. Retrieved 14 January 2020.

External links[edit]