Sambal stingray

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Sambal stingray

Sambal stingray, also known as Spicy Banana Leaf Stingray[1] and by the Malay name Ikan bakar (barbecued fish), is a Malaysian/Singaporean seafood dish. Prepared by barbecuing stingray, it is served with sambal paste atop. Sambal stingray can be easily purchased at hawker centers in both Malaysia and Singapore.

History[edit]

Stingray was previously deemed as not popular and was cheap to purchase; given the enhancement of its taste, the value of stingray in markets has since risen. Originating from Malaysia, the dish is now also popular among Singaporeans.[2] Its Malay name is Ikan bakar, which literally means barbecued fish.[3]

Ingredients[edit]

The sambal paste served with the stingray is made up of spices (sometimes including belachan), Indian walnuts, and shallots.[4] Other ingredients may include garlic, sugar,[1] Chinese parsley, or raw peanuts.[5] The paste is then spread on top of stingray fins,[6] preferably fresh ones. In addition, female ones are preferred to male ones.[7] White fish is in some instances used as an alternative, usually when stingray cannot be found.[2] Flavor enhancers include white pepper or salt.[2] Other recipes involve small amounts of brandy and olive oil.[8] The dish is commonly accompanied with lime or lemon.[2]

Preparation[edit]

Usually wrapped in banana leaves for ten minutes to cook, the fins of the stingray are first chopped to smaller bits.[6] It also can be wrapped in ginger leaves[9] or aluminium foil.[10] Sambal stingray is charcoal-grilled.[2]

Culture[edit]

Part of Malaysian cuisine, brought by the Portuguese traders to Malacca and used local ingredients. It is a Eurasian dish.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hutton, Wendy (2007). Singapore Food. Marshall Cavendish. p. 107. ISBN 9789812613219. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Wong, David (1995). The Food of Singapore: Authentic Recipes from the Manhattan of the East. Tuttle. p. 80. ISBN 9789625930077. 
  3. ^ Tiwary, Shiv Shanker. Encyclopaedia Of Southeast Asia And Its Tribes (Set Of 3 Vols.). Anmol. p. 195. ISBN 9788126138371. 
  4. ^ Ling, Catherine (April 14, 2010). "40 Singapore foods we can't live without". CNN. 
  5. ^ "Sambal Stingray in Banana Leaf". The New York Times. November 2, 2010. 
  6. ^ a b Lin, Eddie (2009). Extreme Cuisine. Lonely Planet. p. 119. ISBN 9781741798869. 
  7. ^ "8 popular BBQ Stingray stalls". AsiaOne. May 21, 2010. 
  8. ^ Burns, Wendy (2012). From Me to You: Welcome to My Kitchen. Xlibris Corporation. p. 74. ISBN 9781477136256. 
  9. ^ Food Arts 14. Food Arts. 2001. 
  10. ^ Chia, Adeline (May 6, 2007). Sambal stingray, mmm, oiishi. AsiaOne.