Samir Frangieh

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Samir Frangieh
Paris - Salon du livre 2012 - Samir Frangié - 004.jpg
Frangieh in 2012
Born(1945-04-12)12 April 1945
Died11 April 2017(2017-04-11) (aged 71)
Beirut, Lebanon
NationalityLebanese
OccupationJournalist, author
Known for14 March alliance

Samir Frangieh (12 April 1945 – 11 April 2017) was a Lebanese politician and a leftist intellectual.

Early life[edit]

Frangieh was born in Zgharta on 12 April 1945.[1] He hails from an old political family, the Frangieh family.[2] He is the son of Hamid Kabalan Frangieh and Lamia Michel (née Raffoul).[3] Hamid Frangieh was the elder brother of Suleiman Frangieh, who was President of Lebanon (1970-1976).[2] Suleiman Frangieh Jr. was Samir Frangieh's cousin.[4]

Career[edit]

Frangieh was a leading journalist.[5] During the term of president Émile Lahoud, he was one of the opposition leaders, who tried to challenge close allies of the president.[6] The opposition group was also led by Rafik Hariri and Walid Jumblatt.[6] Frangieh was a political ally of Jumblatt.[7]

Frangieh was also one of the founders of the Qornet Shehwan Gathering.[8] In addition, he was part of the 14 March alliance[9] and a member of its general secretariat.[10][11] He was the author of "Beirut manifesto" that was published in Le Monde on 22 June 2004.[1] The manifesto, which was signed by Lebanese intellectuals and eminent public figures, challenged the dominance of Syria in Lebanon.[1]

In the 2005 general elections, he became a member of the Lebanese parliament, representing Zgharta.[12] However, in the general elections of 2009, Frangieh was not included to the election list of the March 14 alliance.[13]

Personal life and death[edit]

Frangieh was the author of The Journey to the Extreme of Violence that was published in 2011.[9] He died on 11 April 2017 in Beirut's Hotel Dieu Hospital.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Dominique Avon; Anaïs-Trissa Khatchadourian; Jane Marie Todd (10 September 2012). Hezbollah: A History of the "Party of God". Harvard University Press. p. 200. ISBN 978-0-674-06752-3. Retrieved 14 April 2013.
  2. ^ a b Elie Hajj (13 March 2013). "New March 14 Group to Launch in Lebanon Next Week". Al Monitor. Retrieved 14 March 2013.
  3. ^ "General Election 2005: (14)". Zgharta. 14 June 2005. Retrieved 14 March 2013.
  4. ^ Megan K. Stack (19 April 2005). "Lebanon, a House Divided". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 14 April 2013.
  5. ^ Gary C. Gambill (Spring 2001). "Is Syria Losing Control of Lebanon?". Middle East Quarterly. 8 (2): 41–49. Retrieved 14 March 2013.
  6. ^ a b Charles Glass (4 August 2005). "An Assassin's Land". London Review of Books. 27 (15). Archived from the original on 29 May 2014. Retrieved 9 April 2013.
  7. ^ Charles Glass (1 March 2007). "The lord of no man's land: A guided tour through Lebanon's ceaseless war". Harper's Magazine. Archived from the original on 8 February 2013. Retrieved 9 April 2013.
  8. ^ "Qornet Shehwan Gathering" (PDF). Middle East Mirror. Retrieved 14 April 2013.
  9. ^ a b "Samir Frangieh: The Orthodox Law insults the dignity of Lebanese Citizens". iloubnan. Beirut. 3 February 2013. Retrieved 14 March 2013.
  10. ^ "Lebanon". Coincilation Resources. Retrieved 14 March 2013.
  11. ^ "March 14 warn of bids to link national security to Syria". Lebanon News. 1 April 2012. Retrieved 14 April 2013.
  12. ^ "Talking To: Samir Franjieh". Now Lebanon. 1 October 2008. Retrieved 14 March 2013.
  13. ^ Robert G. Rabii (6 June 2009). "Lebanon at the crossroads". Lebanonwire. Archived from the original on 23 March 2013. Retrieved 24 March 2013.
  14. ^ "Former MP Frangieh dies at 72". The Daily Star. Beirut. 11 April 2017. Retrieved 11 April 2017.

External links[edit]