Sanguisorba

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Sanguisorba
Sanguisorba minor0.jpg
Flower head of Sanguisorba minor
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Rosales
Family: Rosaceae
Subfamily: Rosoideae
Tribe: Sanguisorbeae
Subtribe: Sanguisorbinae
Genus: Sanguisorba
L.
Species

See text.

Synonyms
  • Poterium L.

Sanguisorba is a genus of flowering plants in the family Rosaceae native to the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. The common name is burnet.

Description[edit]

The plants are perennial herbs or small shrubs. The stems grow to 50–200 cm tall and have a cluster of basal leaves, with further leaves arranged alternately up the stem. The leaves are pinnate, 5–30 cm long, with 7-25 leaflets, the leaflets with a serrated margin. Young leaves grow from the crown in the center of the plant. The flowers are small, produced in dense clusters 5–20 mm long; each flower has four very small petals, white to red in colour.

Species[edit]

There are about 30 species, including:[1][2]

Ecology[edit]

Sanguisorba minor is a food plant for the larvae of the grizzled skipper (Pyrgus malvae) and the mouse moth (Amphipyra tragopoginis).

Cultivation and uses[edit]

Burnets are cultivated as garden plants. Many cultivars have been bred, especially from S. officinalis. S. canadensis is grown for its white flowers on stems that well exceed a meter tall. The plants hybridize easily, producing new mixes.[3] S. obtusa is valued for its foliage of pink-edged, gray-green leaves.[4]

S. officinalis is used medicinally in Asia to treat gastrointestinal conditions and bleeding.[5]

Etymology[edit]

Sanguisorba means ‘blood stauncher’. ‘Sangui’ is a cognate with ‘sanguine’, meaning 'blood red'. ‘Sorba’ means 'to staunch’. The plant is known to have styptic properties.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sanguisorba. Flora of China.
  2. ^ GRIN Species Records of Sanguisorba. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN).
  3. ^ Sutton, J. Sanguisorba in Cultivation. Archived 2013-08-28 at the Wayback Machine. The Plantsman. Royal Horticultural Society. June, 2007. 78-83.
  4. ^ Bourne, V. How to grow: Sanguisorba. The Daily Telegraph September 21, 2002.
  5. ^ Choi J, Kim MY, Cha BC, Yoo ES, Yoon K, Lee J, Rho HS, Kim SY, Cho JY (January 2012). "ZYM-201 sodium succinate ameliorates streptozotocin-induced hyperlipidemic conditions". Planta Med. 78 (1): 12–7. doi:10.1055/s-0031-1280219. PMID 21928167. 
  6. ^ Gledhill, David (2008). The Names of Plants. MCambridge University Press. p. 339. ISBN 9780521866453.