Shahvaar Ali Khan

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Shahvaar Ali Khan is a Pakistani writer, singer-songwriter and composer. His first single "No Saazish No Jang" is being touted as the official peace anthem by youth organisations across South Asia and America. In the peace anthem song, Shahvar has used the voices of Muhammad Ali Jinnah, Imran Khan, Benazir Bhutto, Mahatma Gandhi and Barack Obama. The song has also been especially well received by Pakistani, Indian, Bangladeshi and Nepali students from colleges like Harvard, Trinity, NYU and many other institutions abroad, in addition to assorted listeners in Pakistan and India[1][2]

Shahvaar Ali Khan graduated in Economics & International Studies from Trinity College in Hartford Connecticut after attending Cambridge Rindge & Latin School, MA, USA and Lahore Grammar School. After meandering from Investment Banking in New York to the Petroleum Industry in Pakistan the passion for music, entertainment, writing, an amalgamation of business acumen, people skills and penchant for creativity landed Shahvaar in Advertising. Shahvaar found the whole ad man lifestyle intriguing in the company of some extremely artistic peers and incisive clients, which helped him understand the pulse of the audience. Concurrently, Shahvaar started singularly focusing on his Music, singing, songwriting/writing since 2008 and did a soft/viral internet availability of his first song "NO SAAZISH, NO JANG – Peace NOT Pieces" (NSNJ) on his website as an experiment.[3][4]

Even without a Music Video-launching pad or a single advertising dollar spent on promoting NSNJ, Shahvaar found himself sharing print space with the likes of Shahrukh Khan and Michael Jackson as Front Page news on many Pakistani and Indian Newspapers/Magazines including The News Instep, The Times of India (Delhi/Bombay Times), The Hindu, The Daily Jang, MSN India, Yahoo India, The Asian Age – Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, London, Deccan Chronicle, India, News Today, India, The Daily Siasat, India, USA Today, Hum Shehri (Urdu), Pakistan, India News (Hindi), Bombay Mid Day, Daily Pakistan (Urdu), etc. including a few Bollywood websites. However, despite the response, contrary to his expectations the struggle for Shahvaar had just begun. It took him close to two years to find the right concept and Director for his Music Video. In the meantime Shahvaar started writing for publications and opened his own Advertising Creative shop.[5][6]

References[edit]

[7][8][9] <[10][11][12]

  1. ^ "The Times of India". The Times of India. 14 July 2009. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 
  2. ^ "The Hindu". Chennai, India: The Hindu. 7 July 2009. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 
  3. ^ "The Saturday Post". The Saturday Post. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 
  4. ^ The News on Sunday – Shahvaar Ali Khan, Hidden in the microcosm of music
  5. ^ "Mumbai Mirror". Mumbai Mirror. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 
  6. ^ "The Times of India". The Times of India. 14 July 2009. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 
  7. ^ "The Times of India". The Times of India. 16 July 2011. Retrieved 16 July 2011. 
  8. ^ "The Times of India". The Times of India. 14 July 2009. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 
  9. ^ "The Hindu". Chennai, India: The Hindu. 7 July 2009. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 
  10. ^ "Mumbai Mirror". Mumbai Mirror. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 
  11. ^ "Dear hate-mongers: Sirf Aman ki Asha… nahin hai!". Thenews.jang.com.pk. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 
  12. ^ "The Saturday Post". The Saturday Post. Retrieved 22 April 2011. 

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