Shockabilly

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Shockabilly
OriginNew York City, U.S.
GenresAvant-rock
Years active1982–1985
Labels
Past membersEugene Chadbourne
Kramer
David Licht

Shockabilly was an American avant-rock band from New York City. Shockabilly released four studio albums between 1982 and 1985, displaying an experimental approach to music that encompassed influence from numerous genres. The band's line-up included Eugene Chadbourne on guitar and vocals, Mark Kramer on bass guitar and organ, and David Licht on drums.[1]

Style and influences[edit]

Although the name of the group suggested that Shockabilly were a rockabilly band, only one release by the group, The Dawn of Shockabilly, contained any rockabilly influence.[2] Shockabilly was actually an avant-rock band,[3] although the band's experimental approach to music saw their works encompassing many genres, including blues,[2] country,[4] folk,[4] folk-rock,[5] lo-fi,[4] noise rock,[2] psychedelic,[4] rockabilly,[2][6] rock and roll[3][6] and surf,[2] all of which would be explored in avant-garde arrangements, as the band performed covers of songs by other artists that were nearly unrecognizable from the original compositions.[2][6] The band's music has been seen as a possible influence on the later works of future experimental rock bands such as Sonic Youth, and Primus, where the vocals of Les Claypool have been compared to the vocal style used by Eugene Chadbourne in Shockabilly.[3]

Discography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gehr, Richard; Green, Jim; Robbins, Ira (2007). "Shockabilly". Trouser Press. Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e f York, William. "Shockabilly: The Dawn of Shockabilly > Review". Allmusic. Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  3. ^ a b c Mason, Stewart. "Shockabilly: Vietnam/Heaven > Review". Allmusic. Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  4. ^ a b c d York, William. "Shockabilly: Vietnam > Review". Allmusic. Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  5. ^ York, William. "Shockabilly: Colosseum > Review". Allmusic. Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  6. ^ a b c Colin Larkin, ed. (1992). The Guinness Who's Who of Indie and New Wave Music (First ed.). Guinness Publishing. p. 251. ISBN 0-85112-579-4.
  7. ^ "Shockabilly | Album Discography". AllMusic. Retrieved 21 June 2021.

External links[edit]