Special Force (2003 video game)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Special Force (Hezbollah))
Jump to: navigation, search
For the 2004 South Korean developed game, see Special Force (online game).
Special Force
Developer(s) Hezbollah
Publisher(s) Hezbollah
Engine Genesis3D
Platform(s) Microsoft Windows
Release date(s) 2003
Genre(s) First-person shooter
Mode(s) Single-player

Special Force is a first-person shooter video game, developed and published by the Lebanese political group Hezbollah,[1] created using the Genesis 3D engine. The game is set in a 3D environment, in which the player takes the role of a Hezbollah combatant fighting the Israel Defense Forces. A message on the cover of the game's box says "the designers of Special Force are very proud to provide you with this special product, which embodies objectively the defeat of the Israeli enemy and the heroic actions taken by heroes in Lebanon." It adds: "Be a partner in the victory. Fight, resist and destroy your enemy in the game of force and victory."[2]

Mahmoud Rayya, an official from Hezbollah, said "This game is resisting the Israeli occupation through the media. [...] In a way, Special Force offers a mental and personal training for those who play it, allowing them to feel that they are in the shoes of the fighters."[3]

The game can be played in Arabic, English, French and Persian. The game sold out the first run of 8,000 copies within a week[4] when it was released in Lebanon, Syria, Iran, Bahrain, and United Arab Emirates in early 2003.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Toby Harnden (21 February 2004). "Video games attract young to Hizbollah". Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved 17 July 2007. 
  2. ^ "Hezbollah's new computer game". WorldNetDaily, 3 March 2003. Accessed 24 March 2007.
  3. ^ "Hezbollah's new computer game". WorldNetDaily, 3 March 2003. Accessed 24 March 2007.
  4. ^ Associated Press wire report. "Hezbollah computer game takes propaganda war on Israel to virtual battlefield". Jefferson City, Missouri News Tribune, 23 July 2004. Accessed 24 March 2007.

External links[edit]

Academic resources[edit]