Swedish detainees at Guantanamo Bay

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The United States Department of Defense acknowledges holding one Swedish captive in Guantanamo.[1][2]

Mehdi Mohammad Ghezali, the sole Swedish captive in Guantanamo, was repatriated prior to the institution of the Combatant Status Review Tribunals.[3] He was the subject of a feature-length documentary that has received world-wide distribution.[4]

Ghazali was apprehended by Pakistani authorities in August 2009 with a dozen other individuals.[5] Pakistani security officials claim the travelers planned to travel to Miranshah to meet with a Taliban leader. Ghezali says they were traveling to Lahore to attend a Tablighi Jamaat conference.

A young Swedish couple, Munir Awad and Safia Benaouda, who were visiting Somalia when it was invaded by Kenyan and Ethiopian forces in 2007, reported being captured by Kenyan soldiers who were led by Americans.[6] They reported being held in secret detention centres run with American oversight, and being interrogated by American interrogators. They were set free after several months of extrajudicial detention.[5] They were later captured with Ghezali in Pakistan.

References[edit]

  1. ^ OARDEC (May 15, 2006). "List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006" (PDF). United States Department of Defense. Retrieved 2007-09-29. 
  2. ^ OARDEC (2008-10-09). "Consolidated chronological listing of GTMO detainees released, transferred or deceased" (PDF). Department of Defense. Retrieved 2008-12-28. 
  3. ^ John J. Lumpkin (2004-10-18). "7 ex-detainees return to fighting: Guantanamo release process called imperfect". Boston Globe. Archived from the original on 2009-09-16. In Sweden, Mehdi-Muhammed Ghezali, who was released in July after more than two years at the base, is being monitored by Swedish intelligence agents. While Sweden's security police, SAPO, gave no official comment, its agents have said Ghezali is not a threat. 
  4. ^ Gitmo: The new rules of war at the Internet Movie Database
  5. ^ a b "Terror suspect Swedes still detained: Pakistan". The Local. 2009-09-16. Archived from the original on 2009-09-16. 
  6. ^ Raymond Bonner (2007-04-15). "Lark to Africa descends into Somali nightmare". International Herald Tribune. Archived from the original on 2009-09-16.