Talk:Cambric

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ugh[edit]

This is a terrible page. WTF is chambray? Shouldn't the opening paragraph tell me that? I know it's a fabric, but what is it? Ridiculous.

[edit]

Is Batiste the same? Xx236 10:43, 27 September 2006 (UTC)

See below.--Felix Folio Secundus (talk) 10:59, 1 October 2013 (UTC)

Cambric shirt[edit]

Isn't a Cambric shirt something you get buried in? linas 05:36, 1 November 2006 (UTC)

Cambric material[edit]

Cambric is much older than Monsieur Cambrai and therefore could not have been invented by him - this derivation must therefore be considered bogus.

The word appears as "cambre" in the online Anglo-Norman Dictionary with several meanings:

♦ hemp ♦ linen ♦ cambric (linen cloth)

The Anglo-Norman dictionary includes citations for its use in literature with these specific meanings, dating from the 12th century onwards. Cambre is derived from the town of Cambrai in France which was a main centre of production ('Webster's Collegiate Dictionary 1928 edition'). As with many terms for fabric, its meaning has changed over the centuries and the term later came to be applied to cotton cloth, which was an extremely rare commodity in the 12th century.

Ranulfus 09:52, 15 June 2007 (UTC)

Monsieur Cambrai[edit]

Ranulfus, I think the "Jean-Baptiste Cambrai" is from a botched edit from November 14, 2005 (replacing "first used in Cambrai"). Whoever put that in must've meant Jean-Baptiste something-or-other in Cambrai, France.

(Kejo13 (talk) 19:36, 15 January 2008 (UTC))

According to the French article his name is Baptiste Cambray, and he was born near Cambrai. Yves-Laurent (talk) 06:28, 8 August 2008 (UTC)
Old hoax.Racconish Tk 20:08, 11 October 2011 (UTC)

Batiste[edit]

The French WP article «Batiste» treats batiste and cambric as synonyms. Therefore the two English articles on these topics should probably be merged.--Felix Folio Secundus (talk) 10:58, 1 October 2013 (UTC)

I suggest merging Cambric into Batiste as Batiste is more used than Cambric. Some refs here. Cheers, — Racconish Tk 11:40, 1 October 2013 (UTC)
For further discussion see here. The consensus is to keep the two articles separate.--Felix Folio Secundus (talk) 08:22, 3 October 2013 (UTC)

cambric tea[edit]

A drink for children, made of hot water, milk, sugar, and usually a small amount of tea. [So called because it is thin and white like cambric. ... Earliest reference I could find is from 1882's 'Ting-a-ling', but usage persists to the present, mostly in genre/period fiction. 69.125.59.43 (talk) 04:22, 13 December 2013 (UTC)