Talk:Court of Augmentations

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Untitled[edit]

Both reference links First Dissolution Act (1536) [1] Second Dissolution Act (1539) [2] lead to 404 errors.

Henry VIII promised the people of England that if he could appropriate the church's property, they would never be troubled by an increase in taxes ever again. Henry was not the first nor last ruler to lie to his subjects by a false pretext of government thievery for the supposed good of the people.